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I have a gasket question


kskwsde's Avatar
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03-26-04, 01:43 PM   #1  
I have a gasket question

I am going to replace the valve cover gaskets on my 1998 Lumina LTZ, 3.8L V6. I may also end up replacing the intake manifold gasket as well. I was wondering if anyone can recommend any specific brand of gasket I should buy...Are there different grades of quality, or any different types of material, and if so what would be the best brand/type to use? If I do this, I want to do it right, and I want to use the best, premium gaskets I can find. Any suggestions are appreciated, thank you.

Regards,
Kevin

 
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03-26-04, 02:30 PM   #2  
Gaskets I don't think there is really any special ones out there,but there is an aftermarket kit to strenghten or repair where the egr system goes through the upper plenum call around and find one or replace the plenum while in there.Have good torque wrench and follow the service manual for torque the lower intake gaskets are a low clamp load design gasket and overtightening will be bad.I do have a question for you though,are your valve cover gaskets leaking?I work at a Buick/Gmc dealer and I have never seen a series II 3.8 K engine leak from a valve cover yet to any noticable degree.I'm not saying they can't just hasn't been my experience so far.Intake gaskets yes,oil pan gaskets yes but not valve covers.

 
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03-26-04, 04:05 PM   #3  
Fel-Pro is by far the best in the gasket business.

 
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03-26-04, 08:11 PM   #4  
Thanks for your reply - I am not exactly sure where the leak is coming from for sure, but I figured I would start with the valve covers, and if that didn't solve the leak then I would do the intake manifold. I have been searching online and found out that there are a lot of people that have had problems with the intake manifold gasket leaking, in fact if you do a search online you can see one website that was trying to do a petition drive to try and get GM to recall the gaskets. So maybe like you said it's not the valve covers. Do you think I should do the intake manifold gasket and see if that solves the problem? I think the leak is originating somewhere above the oil pan though, because a little bit of oil drips down on the exhaust.

I've got a torque wrench and a hayne's manual w/ torque specifications, so that shouldn't be a problem.

Can you think of anything else that is worth checking, while I have the intake manifold (or any of these other things mentioned) opened up?

Thanks for all the great advice

Kevin

 
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03-26-04, 08:13 PM   #5  
here's that website i mentioned (w/ the petition):

[url]http://


Kevin Sorry but this forum can't be used to help a potential lawsuit move forward.Davo


Last edited by davo; 04-02-04 at 03:46 PM.
 
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03-26-04, 09:34 PM   #6  
mike from nj
i'll admit felpro makes a good product, but if you want the best money can buy, there's no arguing it's sold at the dealer. i've used felpro gaskets over the years, and a lot more from the factory. one is clearly better.

one example: i was trying to keep a family member's 83 cadillac (HT4100) from leaking from the timing cover and oil pan. after two aftermarket paper/cork gaskets, i spent the money at the dealer and got a steel reinforced, rubber lined gasket than never once seeped a hint of oil after that.

when i'm installing aftermarket remanufactured long block engines, that come with felpro gaskets in the crate, i save those gaskets and use the ones from our own parts department. comparing the two, side by side, there is a difference, and i definitely won't risk a 'come-back' for a bad gasket.

this is not for all gaskets....some are so similiar, they look 'almost' identical, but some of the paper ones are clearly inferior (felpro vs. factory)

as far as aftermarket gaskets in general, i'd say felpro is about the best.

my 2 cents

 
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03-29-04, 07:20 AM   #7  
thanks for the info - regardless of the brand, I think I'm definitely going to look to buy the steel-reinforced, rubber-lined gasket...and will probably start with intake manifold first, thinking about it, i guess it makes sense that the valve covers would be less prone to leaking

another question though, is it necessary to use a gasket sealant when installing new gaskets, and if so is there any particular brand that you would recommend for that? what will stand up best to the high temps, etc..? and exactly what is the best procedure for applying sealant - how long does it need to sit and 'cure' before you can put everthing back together?

thanks again,
kevin

 
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03-29-04, 05:12 PM   #8  
Why on earth would you change anything that you don't know is leaking. That's not the way to approach the problem. Examine the car closely from the bottom. Look for the highest point you see fresh oil. The cleaner the metal, the fresher the leak. If you still can't be sure, have the engine cleaned completely and add some ultraviolet dye to the oil so you can go back later with a black light and just follow the trail. If you just start taking things apart, your probably going to create more leaks than you have now. I wouldn't change anything until I have positive confirmation that is my leak for sure. You can chase these things forever. Oil can come from a million places and travel to a million more..

 
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04-02-04, 02:48 PM   #9  
Thanks for the advice - i had already taken the car in as part of a basic tuneup/diagnostic, they did not do a dye test, but just looked for signs of leaking and said it was leaking from either the rear valve cover, or the intake manifold, or both. I will take it in and have an engine dye test done to determine exactly which points it is leaking from.

I am still looking for an answer to the question in my previous post to this thread, the question regarding gasket sealants, do i need to use a sealant and if so what's the best brand? (see previsou post)

Thank you,
Kevin

 
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04-02-04, 03:52 PM   #10  
I use black rtv sealant when I repair those intake gaskets.I suggest GM gaskets but you may do as you wish.The rtv only goes where instructed in your manual.

 
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04-02-04, 04:12 PM   #11  
Originally posted by davo
I use black rtv sealant when I repair those intake gaskets.I suggest GM gaskets but you may do as you wish.The rtv only goes where instructed in your manual.
I think Davo's referring to the ends of the manifold only, not to the intake surfaces or the valve covers.

 
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04-06-04, 12:06 PM   #12  
just want to make sure i follow - the only gasket that uses sealant is the intake manifold and that only takes sealant around the perimeter of the gasket?

thanks,
kevin

 
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04-06-04, 01:59 PM   #13  
When you take it apart you will see the old rtv just put rtv were it was before.Don't put rtv on the gasket perimeter.Basically just the corners.

 
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05-08-04, 10:46 PM   #14  
poppalizerd
oil leak

they have a motor oil you can buy from a local department
maxx life it is got red die in it i forgot who makes it its a red bottle and it say maxx life on it

i stay away from detergent oils cause in my opinion its bad period i stick with non detergent because the detergent oil have patrolium liquids in that i feel wear down seals and or anything rubber over a long period of time
common sence if you think about it

 
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05-09-04, 02:48 AM   #15  
Posted By: poppalizerd i stay away from detergent oils cause in my opinion its bad period i stick with non detergent because the detergent oil have patrolium liquids in that i feel wear down seals and or anything rubber over a long period of time
common sence if you think about it
Your "common sence" (sense) is lost in the 60's. There is absolutely no truth to that statement.

 
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05-09-04, 04:46 AM   #16  
Don't use non detergent motor oil in any modern internal combustion engine if you want it to last.It will void a new car warranty and slugde up th engine.My lawn mower takes detergent motor oil.

 
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