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2 ?'s A/C and Fuel Filter 1990 F-150


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06-20-04, 06:50 PM   #1  
smj5169
2 ?'s A/C and Fuel Filter 1990 F-150

I have a 1990 Ford F-150 with a 5.0 A/T, question # 1, it was changed from R12 to 134 in 2000 and it was fine till end of last year, I paid to get it filled back up with freon and it only lasted about 2 week blowing cold, I know it could be numerous things but are o-rings more a possibility than evaporator? Also in haynes manual it says to relieve pressure on fuel line before changing fuel filter, I would like to know how you do this? I have a 1995 Voyager with Fuel injection and changed it without relieving pressure. If I have to how do I do it? Thanks

 
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06-21-04, 03:41 AM   #2  
Yes, the evaporator is more likely than O-rings, but so are the compressor and condenser. The rings frequently seep but are rarely the sole problem. R134 may be cheaper but it creates a whole new set of problems when put into an R12 system. I never agreed with doing that.
For the fuel pressure question, look on the inside firewall near the floor mat on the pass side for the inertia switch. Unplug it and run the engine until it stalls, that will be quick. Now your pressure is gone. Remember to plug it back in when finished. Cycle the key on for 10 seconds a couple times to build pressure back up before starting.

 
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06-25-04, 03:18 PM   #3  
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You can purchase a do it yourself kit from your local auto store and even some larger department stores that have the dye additive. For the price of the professional doing it it is much more cost effective and you should be able to isolate the leak.

 
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06-25-04, 05:06 PM   #4  
Posted By: whokares2 You can purchase a do it yourself kit from your local auto store and even some larger department stores that have the dye additive. For the price of the professional doing it it is much more cost effective and you should be able to isolate the leak.
Dye usually isn't much help in finding an evaporator leak. You have to get a visual on it.

 
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