Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

Hydraulic Clutch Trouble


jpster's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

08-01-04, 09:54 PM   #1  
jpster
Hydraulic Clutch Trouble

96 Jeep Cherokee-the clutch normally engages out a ways from the floor like normal but when it's being used alot (in a parking lot or stop n go traffic) it will start to engage very close to the floor even so much as to hinder changing gears. Any suggestions? I'm lost. Your help is appreciated.
Jim

 
Sponsored Links
Desi501's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 2,207

08-02-04, 02:30 AM   #2  
First, check the fluid level. If it's low then locate the leak but it sounds like the clutch master is starting to fail.

 
jpster's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

08-02-04, 03:46 PM   #3  
jpster
The fluid level seems to be normal. So it would be the master then? Even if it isn't all the time? Only when it's used alot?
Thanks for the help.
Jim

 
Desi501's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 2,207

08-02-04, 06:08 PM   #4  
When it starts acting up, are you noticing excessive free play in the pedal travel before feeling resistance ?

 
jpster's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

08-03-04, 04:34 PM   #5  
jpster
No it's more like when I'm in traffic and I let the clutch partway out to move a little ways then when I put it back to the floor, the next time I let it out the car literally starts moving as soon as I move the pedal from the floor. Less than an inch.
And on top of that when I shift in or out of gear while the same circumstances are occuring, it doesn't shift smoothly at all. You can hear and feel it "clunk" in or out of the gear. It's almost like the clutch is partway out when it's actually all the way to the floor. Once I start moving and using the clutch regular, it is fine.
After reading my Haynes manual it makes sense that it would be the master cylinder but any other opinion is much appreciated.
Thanks again for your help and advice.
Jim

 
Desi501's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 2,207

08-04-04, 02:37 AM   #6  
It can also be an internal problem with the pressure plate and disc. That's why I'm trying to determine if your getting more free play in the top of the pedal to determine if your getting less hydraulic "throw" which would indicate a Master problem. If you meet the resistance further down the pedal travel, then you'll have less distance to push the clutch before hitting bottom. Have you ever tried "pumping" the clutch pedal first.

 
jpster's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

08-04-04, 04:08 PM   #7  
jpster
Yes actually I have resorted to that sometimes and it works. I just knew that the same principle works for hydraulic brakes so I tried it and it works. I've had other vehicles with clutches before like 78 Chevys and I know what clutch disc/pressure plate problems can feel like. It's not like freeplay at the top of the pedal. It engages perfectly the first time and then, if I let it only partway out like in traffic or parking lot situations then it will start to move the vehicle when I release it only an inch or less from the floor instead of the 6 or so inches from the floor that it usually is.
Sorry if this is confusing you more.
Jim

 
goldstar's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 4,286
OH

08-04-04, 06:35 PM   #8  
I would first bleed the clutch to eliminate the possibility of an air bubble in the line. If that doesn't solve it, the seals on the piston in the master are probably bad and a master cylinder rebuild is in order.

 
jpster's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

08-05-04, 04:41 PM   #9  
jpster
If the seals were bad would there be fluid leaking somewhere around the master cylinder?
Jim

 
Desi501's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 2,207

08-05-04, 06:01 PM   #10  
Posted By: jpster If the seals were bad would there be fluid leaking somewhere around the master cylinder?
Jim
Not necessarily, it can leak right back into the resevoir. Forget the rebuild idea though. Once the aluminum gets pitted, there's nothing you can do. Just buy a new one and you shouldn't have any further problems, with the master at least. Even bleeding would be a waste of time. It shouldn't have introduced air in the first place and could again. ( assuming there is air, probably not)

 
jpster's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

08-05-04, 08:36 PM   #11  
jpster
THANK YOU!
Replacing it is the option I will choose. I'm not a big fan of troubleshooting something that is as easy to replace as it is to check. If I get a new one in there and there's still problems at least there's a new one in there. (LOL)
Thank you once again for saving me a TON of cash at the garage when I am capable of doing it myself.
Jim

 
Search this Thread