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obd2 scanners


mitchella's Avatar
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08-16-04, 10:19 AM   #1  
obd2 scanners

Anyone have experience with these scanners? Not just code readers, but like the auterra?

 
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davo's Avatar
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08-16-04, 05:36 PM   #2  
I have never heard of it but if it's generic(most likely) it has very little diagnostic power compared to a real scan tool.It may give you most of the info you need as a doityourselfer.Pm me the website and I'll look and give you my opinion.

 
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08-20-04, 11:07 AM   #3  
obd2 scanner

Auterra is the name of the unit. It plugs into the car and you need a handheld like Palm for the display/controls. It has all the engine codes/defs and also shows the sensor readings (all that's available) like temp/timing/ air flow/O2 sensors, rpm,fuel trim, etc. They can be graphed, or displayed like a meter. They can also be recorded for latr playback or downloaded to your desktop. The site is xxx.xxx I appreciate your feedback. I asked you to pm me the info.Davo


Last edited by davo; 08-20-04 at 02:34 PM.
 
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08-20-04, 03:05 PM   #4  
Looks like a nice tool but the price is a little steep for the average do it yourselfer at almost $600.In a 5 minute web search I found a hand held scanner that does almost all the same things for $369.I went no further maybe I would have even found something cheaper.Most diyers wouldn't understand all of the info the tool gives them anyhow.If the cost is in your budget and you understand what the info on the tool means go for it.I think a big factor would be if you already had a palm pilot.Then you would be saving by getting that one.

 
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08-20-04, 04:50 PM   #5  
scanner cost/info

I got the "CAN" enabled obd2 scanner on ebay for $200, and the used palm on ebay for $30. It seems to work well, but would look cooler on a color scanner--but not necessary. I'm not sure how to use the "fuel trim" data, but I'm recording the various sensor data in cluding O2 sensor data for saving on my desktop; maybe it will come in handy some day to compare to a questionable lazy/bad sensor so I can see if it's output has changed. I know not to use any trouble code as a diagnosis, so maybe having sensor data will help.

 
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08-21-04, 05:17 AM   #6  
Sounds like you did ok.Having a baseline for your sensors is a good idea so you can compare them if something goes south.One suggestion would be to record them at idle,1500,2500 rpm with the engine cold and the engine fully warmed up.Record the fuel trim also so if it changes it may also help you towards a diagnosis.One thing about some aftermarket scanners is they only work on one car or car line.I would not buy one of those.I know yours is not like this,my statement is for the benefit of other members that may be thinking of buying one.

 
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08-21-04, 06:13 AM   #7  
lorax123
Davo, for at home use we have a used Snap-On Diagnostic scanner and the modules to cover all domestics up to '95 (my dad got used for $400 of the Snap-On guy) but for all OBD II we just borrow an ACCUTRON hand scanner from where he works. I know the handheld gives data from all the senors, clears codes, can freeze data, make movies, and can print-out )if you had a printer). Seems like it does everything you would need (other than OEM specific functions). Pep Boys usually runs a sale on similiar scan tools for around $200.

My question is other than OEM commands and what not (odometer checks, pulling up a code 99 (isn't that the code that says a code was cleared manually, not becuase the problem was fixed?). What do the professional scan tools also do?
I was just checking the Snap-On site and it seems as if their OBD II scanner doesn't do much more (it appears upgradeable tho) than the DIY ones available.

Just curious, thanks for any insight.

 
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08-21-04, 09:13 AM   #8  
They can control solenoids like egr,purge,vent,trans shift solenoids,pressure control solenoids,steering actuators,read body control codes,abs codes(output control to bleed brakes properly)airbag codes,AIR pumps/solenoids,reset personalization features,set options,operate lights,wipers view sensors/data other than just powertrain and you can program modules with them.If you think this isn't important you may find yourself trying to fix something and replace every component and get the same end result it still does not work.Know why because it is a software issue.I had an older gal come in and say can you people please fix my car I've had it worked on 19 times(I saw the receipts)and the service engine soon light still comes on.I reprogrammed the pcm and the old gal won't be back.This is more common than you would think and is becoming more common as modules such as door window switches will need programmed to work.Actuators for hvac systems,some ride height sensors need calibrated in some instances only professional tools will do most of these things.With pro scanners you would also know if you are dealing with communication codes.I consider a professional scan tool a manufactuer specific scan tool that was designed to take advantage of all the software/hardware applications built into their vehicles.A Snap on red brick is ok but will give you bad info in some cases,alot is generic info as are other aftermarket scan tools.If I had to use an aftermarket scan tool it would be an OTC genesys because it has more of the manufacturer specific cpabilities.This is my opinion so if any one wants to hammer me for my answer go for it or feel free to add to it.I will say if all you think all you need from a scan tool is powertrain codes you are not going to fix many cars in the not to distant future.

 
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08-21-04, 10:20 AM   #9  
lorax123
Thanks for informing me Davo. I checked out the Genesis you were talking about, pretty neat. That actually allows you to go in and do commands that OEMs diagnostic tools let you do? Just curious, OBD II cars are getting to the trickle down point where they are pretty cheap now, so i'll probably be owning more of them.
Anyways, I was just curious. Thanks for answering the Q so quickly.

 
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