Brushes for starter motor for Accord '92

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  #1  
Old 10-10-04, 07:38 PM
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Brushes for starter motor for Accord '92

Hi everybody,

I've narrowed my problems with the starter motor on my Accord '92 (manual) to brushes. They are just worn out and have to be replaced. The problem is that a local dealer told me that they do not sell separately in USA, you can only get the whole assembly for about $200. The brushes themselves would probably cost $15 or so.

Is there a way to get those shipped from Japan or something? It would still be cheaper than getting a new motor, which is perfectly functional. Does anybody have other suggestions?

Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 10-10-04, 08:16 PM
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If you really want to rebuild your starter, Autozone has a repair kit listed for your vehicle
I assume it has new brushes and a few other parts
It's about 35 bucks
They also have starters for your veh. @ $130-$150 but I think the $200 dealer one is worth the extra $
I have not been impressed with AZ starters
 
  #3  
Old 10-11-04, 04:30 PM
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There isn't much question that your starter needs more than just brushes. Everybody uses reman starters. There's a reason for that. You'll ultimately have to do that anyway.
 
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Old 10-11-04, 05:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Desi501
There isn't much question that your starter needs more than just brushes. Everybody uses reman starters. There's a reason for that. You'll ultimately have to do that anyway.
I do not want to argue in general, but I have disassembled the motor. It looks pretty tough and hard-to-break apart from brushes that are obviously expendables. There is a permanent magnet yoke, that's just a piece of metal, a rotor, which is filled with something like epoxy and also looks very sturdy. Wires in the rotor can short circuit, I suppose, but that's not likely, and that also doesn't require a replacement of the whole assembly. The third component is brushes, which must be cheap and are easily replaceable (more easily, actually, than the whole assembly, since you do not have to unscrew two large bolts that hold the starter assembly, and are not easily accessible).

I can agree that the solenoid is more likely to break/short circuit, but again it doesn't require a replacement of the whole thing. My impression is that the MAIN reason Honda does not replace brushes alone is to help their dealers and other associates (at least in USA, a dealer told me that brushes are available in Japan). It looks like an ideal place for that sort of trick: brushes are expendable, they are designed to be such. They are cheap and can be easily replaced. So, they put together a $200-$250 assembly that a customer have to replace eventually. They take old assembly which is perfectly fine, replace brushes and sell it again for $200. A customer has no choice: a car just stops starting, he can't ignore that, and it is quite easy to convince him that the starter motor is broken and needs replacement, when in fact it just needs a 10-dollar maintenance.

I may be wrong of course. I am by no means an expert but this conclusion seems logical enough. Anyway, I'll try to get a replacement for my brushes prior to replacement of the whole thing.
 
  #5  
Old 10-11-04, 06:57 PM
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Again the conclusion is that repair people are out to screw the consumer....... The name of the game is fixing it right the first time. The armature wears where the brushes ride. The bushings supporting the shafts wear causing movement of the armature. Internal components in the solonoid wear and cause binding and poor electrical contacts on engagement. Drive gear assemblys wear. Slide forks wear. If it was that cheap and reliable to repair a starter, don't you think we technichians would get our hands on those parts. Leave the rebuilding to the professionals, unless of course, you want to do it twice. If so, be my guest.
 
  #6  
Old 10-12-04, 12:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Desi501
Again the conclusion is that repair people are out to screw the consumer....... The name of the game is fixing it right the first time. The armature wears where the brushes ride. The bushings supporting the shafts wear causing movement of the armature. Internal components in the solonoid wear and cause binding and poor electrical contacts on engagement. Drive gear assemblys wear. Slide forks wear. If it was that cheap and reliable to repair a starter, don't you think we technichians would get our hands on those parts. Leave the rebuilding to the professionals, unless of course, you want to do it twice. If so, be my guest.
Desi501, I did not mean to offend anyone, it was just a thought. You are probably right, and if I had a newer car, I would replace the motor.
 
  #7  
Old 10-13-04, 05:28 PM
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Nippon Denso Starter Solenoid Repair

hope this helps try reading this link they have pictures of contacts. Cut and paste this link into your explorer addr line

http://yotarepair.com/startercontacts.html
 
  #8  
Old 10-14-04, 06:31 AM
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Starter repair

I just want to throw my 2 cents in on starter repair. Have you thought about a starter generator repair shop. Look in the yellow pages.
There is a lot to rebuilding a starter like checking the winding cutting the armature,replaceing bearings etc.
I had a Chevrolet truck that had a bad starter and I did not want a AZ starter because they are mostly slap in new brushes paint it black and call it good over the border items.
I took it in to a starter repair shop and was very happy with the results done by this small but very competent shop. Cost was a little more then the AZ starter but a little less then a new Delco.
I know it was done right because the owner talked to me and explained all involved in a starter rebuild.
Another reason I went to have it rebuilt on a Chevy some starters need shims. So by using the same starter that came off I knew none were going to be required.
 
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