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Oil Pan Gasket


helper94's Avatar
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11-26-04, 11:26 PM   #1  
helper94
Oil Pan Gasket

Hello, all,

I have a 96 Honda Civic LX Sedan automatic, and was told by my mechanic that there was some oil seepage near the pan, signifying a bad oil pan gasket and that it needed replacement. Is this a relatively simple job that I could do, and if so how, or should I just pay up the $150 he was looking for(parts and labor)?

 
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11-27-04, 03:19 AM   #2  
It's not that hard of a job as long as you don't mess up the gasket in the process. Having to do it twice wouldn't make it much of a savings.

 
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11-27-04, 08:28 AM   #3  
Pulling the pan and putting on a new gasket should be relativly easy. Just make sure the pan and block are clean and all of the old gasket is removed.

Genuine Honda gaskets are the best in my opinion. Also I have sometimes found that Honda gaskets are cheaper or the same price as those at the auto store. A Honda dealer's parts dept. here will let you look at the factory manual for your car. That way you can see where, what kind, and if they recomend using any sealer. It will also give you all of the torque specs.

The hardest part is taking off what ever might be in the way. The exhaust header probably has to come off and maybe a brace or 2. Get under and take a look to see what is in the way.

If you can afford the time let it sit for a half day or more after you take the pan off. It will drip oil for quite some time. Put down some cardboard or news paper and go watch a football game or something. You will get less oil dripping in your face that way.

 
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11-27-04, 08:51 AM   #4  
helper94
Okay....thank you all for the replies. Though it sounds like something that I can do, there seems to be some small potential for screwing it up and having to have someone repeat it, so I think I'll just get it done professionally. Thanks anyway!!

 
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11-27-04, 11:18 AM   #5  
If I'm not mistaken you'll have to remove part of the exaust system (just remove the bolts to lower the exaust pipe a few inches) in order to get enough clearance to remove the old pan. But other then this it's pretty simple.

 
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11-27-04, 06:15 PM   #6  
Posted By: helper94 Okay....thank you all for the replies. Though it sounds like something that I can do, there seems to be some small potential for screwing it up and having to have someone repeat it, so I think I'll just get it done professionally. Thanks anyway!!
Get under and take a look. It is really not a hard job to do. Just take your time and be patient. The worst part will be getting the nuts off the rear connection to the header pipe if they are rusted. On a 98 they may not be bad. Use a 6 point socket and some penetrating oil. If they come loose you should not have any trouble with the rest. (It is much easier if you take the header pipe off rather that trying to work with it in the way.

 
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11-30-04, 05:31 PM   #7  
helper94
Thank you all for your replies. I think I'll wait until after the holidays to try it, but I wanted to know if I needed any extra tools besides what I have in mind, a socket wrench that is adjustable, a screwdriver, an oil pan.

 
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11-30-04, 06:49 PM   #8  
You will need a 3/8" drive ratchet & extension(s). I believe the pan bolts are 10mm. You will need some other metric sockets. It would be best to have a set that goes up to at least 16mm. 6 point sockets are less likely to strip nuts or bolts that are tight or have been partially rounded off by someone else. For the larger bolts a 1/2" drive ratchet will make it easier to get the larger & tighter bolts loose. When you have time get under there and see what you need in the way of socket sizes & extension lengths. It will make it easier than running after something you need after you get started.

One of the bolts at the rear of the header pipe may be hard to get a socket on. If so you will need a 6 point box end wrench. If you do not have a torque wrench don't overtighten the 10mm head nuts or bolts. Just good and sung is enough. Ask where you buy your auto parts. Many will loan the more uncommon tools like a torque wrench for free when you buy parts and leave a deposit on the tools.

You will have to disconnect the wire to the oxygen sensor in the header pipe. Just look closely. You have to press a little tab on the side before it will pull apart. Then it will just push back together.

If you have to buy some tools get good quality ones like Craftsman etc. They will be guaranteed forever and cheap tools will not last but more importantly they may round off a tight nut or bolt and make it difficult or next to impossible to get off. Particularly on exhaust parts.

You may need a good putty knife or gasket scraper if the old gasket sticks to the block. If it sticks to the pan a wire wheel on a drill works good but don't forget safety glasses.

 
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