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Rotors and Motor Oil


allenzachary's Avatar
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12-23-04, 09:19 AM   #1  
Rotors and Motor Oil

Humbly seeking guidance on generic questions:

1) Repair manuals suggest replacement of brake rotors "if necessary," when replacing pads. What is the criteria for repalcement?

2) The manual for my 98 Honda Civic EX 1.6 146,000K (runs great!) suggests 5W-30 motor oil. The guy in the auto parts store suggested that I use 10W-30 based on the mileage. Whaddya think? Also is the "high mileage" formula really good for my car or just something that a marketing executive dreamt up?

Thanks to all.

allenzachary

 
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hogfan's Avatar
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12-23-04, 11:25 AM   #2  
Rotors and Oil?

Oil = What brand and weight oil have you been running? I would stay with what it had. If you don't know go with the 5w30.

Rotors- Some rotors came be re-surfaced and some can not? So you would needed to find out what type you have?

 
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12-23-04, 01:24 PM   #3  
What is the criteria for repalcement?

Is you are not getting any pulsation, pulling or vibrations when stoping it isn't necessary to replace or resurface the rotors. However, If there is pitting, rust on the braking suface or a pulsation, pulling or vibrations I would mic (measure) them and resurface them if there is enough material. They can be resurfaced (Turned) on a '98 Civic.

5W-30 vs 10w30 motor oil.

If your car isn't using / burning a lot of oil I would go with the 5W30, if it is, go with the 10w30. And yes "high mileage" formula is just something that a marketing executive dreamt up! It just has a little less detergent in the oil and maybe some additives you don't need.

 
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12-23-04, 04:10 PM   #4  
Posted By: DKM What is the criteria for repalcement?

Is you are not getting any pulsation, pulling or vibrations when stoping it isn't necessary to replace or resurface the rotors.
I'm going to disagree with that statement. Installing new pads without at least resurfacing the rotors is a recipe for noises. "pad slaps" nearly always lead to comebacks eventually.

 
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12-23-04, 04:54 PM   #5  
Disagree?

The question was :Repair manuals suggest replacement of brake rotors "if necessary," when replacing pads. What is the criteria for replacement? And I stand by my statement.

My statement was in answer to the question "if necessary," While it is always nice to give new pads a new clean surface to contact I believe it is not "necessary" to replace (or even resurface) the rotors just because the pads are worn. Resurfacing rotors when not necessary can cause other problems, such as pulsation, vibration and a pull, due to the fact that you are taking metal from the rotor, making them more susceptible to warpage. A "Pad Slap" can be done giving the new pads a clean surface to contact without resurfacing or replacing the rotors or creating any additional noises and comebacks. I do it on a fleet of hundreds of vehicles of all different types on a daily basis and less than one percent have any problem at all, and less that that are noises of any kind.

There is always the matter of personal preferences. Driving habits, vehicle, time, money etc., but that is a different question / matter.

 
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12-24-04, 03:01 AM   #6  
if you use a good quality pads you usually will not have noise problems if using a cheaper pad you will likely have brake noise even if you had the rotors resurfaced.
even if you do not have any brake pulsation problems. you should still measure the thickness of the rotor if it is below spec you should replace them.

 
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12-24-04, 04:01 AM   #7  
Brake Noise?

I totally agree with Desi501. The lastest thing is turning those rotors on the car. On the Car Brake Lathe.

 
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12-24-04, 11:20 AM   #8  
my 2 cents

My 2 cents for what it is worth on turning rotors.If the pads are worn and there is no other problems like pulsing or symptoms of disk warpage I remove pads inspect rotor sometimes install a dial indicator to check for runout take some emery cloth and brake cleaner and clean the rotor.install new pads with the anti squeal stuff and call it good.
You can do this if you do it yourself but I find brake shops always want to turn the rotors.I also think thin rotors will warp faster then thick ones.
While on the subject of rotors buy good ones of you need them OEM is best and stay away from the cheap discount.

 
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12-24-04, 01:42 PM   #9  
Posted By: DKM I believe it is not "necessary" to replace (or even resurface) the rotors just because the pads are worn. Resurfacing rotors when not necessary can cause other problems, such as pulsation, vibration and a pull, due to the fact that you are taking metal from the rotor, making them more susceptible to warpage. A "Pad Slap" can be done giving the new pads a clean surface to contact without resurfacing or replacing the rotors or creating any additional noises and comebacks.
Yep, that's the statement I disagree with....... I fully expect the rotors to be measured first and always have a cushion above min spec if machined. I still say doing a pad slap is a recipe for problems. You talk about pulsation problems after resurfacing them. I would assume you would know how to make a good cut without causing that. A rotor surface that has been through the lifespan of one set of pads will begin to see corrosion and glazing in the surface and most times will lead to future pulsations and further glazing. The surface will no longer be flat and will not mate to the surface of the new pads without extensive break in time. This will cause poor braking after installing pads. I probably do 3-5 brake jobs a day and I've been doing this for 38 years so I've seen the results from every scenerio. I stand by my statemnet that you should ALWAYS start with a fresh flat surface with new pads.

 
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12-27-04, 01:04 AM   #10  
Happy?

Desi501, You have your opinion, every ones got one, just like a….. I'm was only sharing my opinion / experience in trying to be helpful and answer the question posted. I've also been doing this for over 30 years and my share of brakes. I didn't post a response to get in a pissing match or to step on anyone’s toes. Since you seem to take offence and just want to debate my post, instead of just sharing your experience on the subject! Since I’m the new guy, and have better things to be doing with my time. I won't bother posting in the Auto repair forum any more, I'm sure I won't be missed. Happy?

 
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12-27-04, 02:38 AM   #11  
I won't even respond to this................

The original poster can conclude what's good advice and what isn't.

 
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12-27-04, 05:13 AM   #12  
I think the orginal poster has been given information from which they can make a decision.

In this profession there are many ways to perform certain jobs. There is the text book way, the real world way, ways that evolve from experience and of course the wrong way. Each way has it's merits.

We as professionals could debate till the end of time which is correct....use what you feel comfortable with, that's what makes us individuals.

This post is closed so we can get back to helping each other.

 
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