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Transimission fluid change question


seancashmere's Avatar
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Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 279
NY

12-26-04, 01:31 PM   #1  
Transimission fluid change question

So I've never seen anyone do it, but I decided to try it myself. I have an automatic Mazda Protege5 2.0L 4 cylinder. I had to buy the expensive stuff, the owner's manual requires Mercon V. I jacked the car up and started wrenching the damned drain plug in the wrong direction (under there my whole world is backwards). So it budged in the wrong direction and did a little stripping. I don't think I compromised the pan's threading though (in fact I'm sure I didn't). So I turned it off properly and let it drain. Then I put the plug and gasket back on, hand tight then I tried to give it a little extra with a crescent wrench but it wouldn't go on any tighter. Then I filled up the transmission with this Mercon V stuff. I had a little trouble with the funnel (a little fluid splashed out). After I put fluid in, I looked under the car and there was some fluid around the base of the tranny. I wiped it off with a clean paper towel and it was the new stuff (it was bright red). It wasn't the drain plug/ pan either, it was they silver colored base. Fine I thought, I didn't touch this part and it's probably the dripping from the new fluid that splashed. So I idled the car and cycled trough the gears and checked back under. I saw that the fluid I wiped had reappeared. I'm worried now. What could've happened? Am I at fault, everything seemed fine before I did the work. I'm worried I voided any warranty claims for transmission work. More importantly, my car's tranny may be leaking.

Alright, so I figure I wait 'till tomorrow and see how much drips, then I repark the car elsewhere and see if anything else drips (to be sure that everything that splashed has finished dripping). If so, I suppose maybe I undertorqued? At the very most, maybe I did screw up the pan and have to replace that (is that hard/expensive to replace? Can I do that by myself)?

Also, what was quite vexing was how close the drain pan was to the differential (I think it's a differential, it looks like one. It's a Front Wheel driver so maybe it doesn't even have a diffenerential I don't know). Anyway, it was so close I couldn't fit a socket wrench in there so that's why I used the crescent wrench (it enabled me more clearance). So when I opened the drain plug, the fluid went everywhere and I wiped most of it all off but things were still greasy. So I can't really tell if the plug is dripping too.

Opinions, what would you all do? What do you suggest I do? Should I run to the dealer and ask them to torque the plug properly for me (would they charge me for a whole hour's labor)?

 
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davo's Avatar
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12-27-04, 03:09 PM   #2  
Tranny fluid could drip for a couple days if you spilled enough.You need to clean it off with solvent and see if it continues to drip,then you may have a problem to correct.

 
seancashmere's Avatar
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NY

12-27-04, 08:04 PM   #3  
Alright, sounds good. What I did was I brought it to a mechanic for a New York State safety inspection. I asked the guy to check the torque on the tranny drain plug for me. I don't know if they bring it up on a lift for those inspections but if they do I guess the tech did it. They told me everything checked out. I won't worry myself, I'll check the fluid once every week or so and see if the level starts to dip then I'll concern myself again. Thanks for the response, I appreciate it.

 
car nut's Avatar
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12-28-04, 08:40 PM   #4  
Next time you are working on your car I suggest you get some proper tools. Crescent (adjustable) wrenches are famous for rounding off bolts and nuts.

Even good quality open end wrenches are best left for jobs that do not need to be very tight. For any nut or bolt that needs to be tight or is hard to remove should be done with a socket or box end wrench. Perferably a 6-point type.

Cheap tools are an invitation for busted knuckles and rounded off nuts and bolts.

 
seancashmere's Avatar
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Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 279
NY

12-28-04, 08:52 PM   #5  
Yeah, there's no clearance in there to fit anything over the drain plug... the crescent wrench was all I had that could get at it. I did round the sucker off and bust my knuckles too, ha ha ha! My engine oil drain plug has been rounded off for a few months too. They're alright though, whenever I get around to it, I'll get fresh drain plugs...

Thanks for the advice.

 
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