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Oil Additive


fireweedfour's Avatar
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03-16-05, 06:17 AM   #1  
fireweedfour
Oil Additive

88 Taurus Wagon, 3.0 Litre with 250,000 km (app 150,000 miles) I'm changing the oil when required but she is starting to make noise on start up. I've added an additive to the transmission and I am now considering the same for the engine. Any recommendations on to what and which brand to help this old lady remain active?

Cheers,

Rob in Alberta

 
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03-16-05, 07:30 AM   #2  
A quart of Rislone is my favorite to quiet beginning signs of tappets and very slow oil consuming engines.

I avoid the thick sludge additives. You need better viscosity, not heavier viscosity. Leave those thick products for engines that are downright burning oil every week.

 
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03-16-05, 08:09 AM   #3  
fireweedfour
Hesitation

Thanks Lug I'll take a look at the store. Would you happen to know what might cause hesitation when accelerating from a stop? I'm at a loss and I don't really want to take the old girl to the shop if I can do it myself.

Rob

 
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03-16-05, 08:50 AM   #4  
Hesitation, hmmm, 250,000 miles. Two places I would start would be to pull codes for the useful information, and a tuneup (plugs, wires, air filter, MAF/throttle cleaner) if that hasn't been done in a long while.

Also, punch the gas when you cruise at 30 mph to accelerate fast and see if you can cause the symptom at other low vacuum times/speeds. Also, does it happen when the engine is only cold or only on hot starts?, or both?

Suspect items could include, faulty idle air control, dirty MAF, vacuum leak, etc, but the list is not limited to those. Pull the codes first and they will point the way.

Keep in mind you have an OBD I system so you need the older style Ford code reader for that. You can buy a Ford code reader at auto parts store for around $30, and they take more time to use than the newer obd II readers. Of course a repair shop will read them for around $50 or more.

 
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03-17-05, 09:26 AM   #5  
fireweedfour
Taurus

Hey Lugnut;

I tuned it up in October, new wires, cap, plugs. What is a MAF/throttle cleaner?

This seems to happen only in warm outside temperatures, above freezing. But the vehicle temp is anything. This only occurs from a stop. It doesn't occur during cruise when I quickly accelerate.

Unfortunately I can't pull the codes. The connector was damaged last time I was at the dealership. They didn't replace it in the holder and it melted on the exhaust manifold.

Thanks for the help.

Rob

 
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03-17-05, 12:55 PM   #6  
Unless the odb I connector is destroyed completely, do try and deform it enought to connect the code reader. All you need are the pins of the plugs to contact and don't worry about the odb I housing.

MAF/throttle cleaner is your run of the mill throttle body cleaner, (similar to carburator cleaner).

Without pulling codes, you might want to test your TPS, Throttle Position Sensor first, after spray cleaning the air intake valve with cleaner. You need a VOM and the Chiltons repair book to perform the correct test. There are several styles of TPS and I don't know which one you have.

 
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03-19-05, 03:53 PM   #7  
I don't think they are refering to Lug's Rislone or my favorite Marvel Mystery Oil but it might warrant some looking into
(I think they mean the heavy stuff, the "sludges")
From The CarConnection:

Oil Additives Bad For Aluminum Blocks?

A team of chemists and mathematicians at the University of Western Ontario deduced that most oil additives are complicated compounds containing zinc and phosphate. They then used computer simulations to find out what happens "at a molecular level when a film of oil containing additives is compressed between two hot, hard surfaces" like engine parts. They concluded that as the pressure rises, the molecules of zinc and phosphate form cross-links with each other, according to a science report in The Washington Post. In engines of steel alloys, this process helps minimize wear. But not so in aluminum engines, where the cross-linked molecular hash becomes harder than the metal and abrades the aluminum surfaces. In other words, if these guys are right, additives are good for engines with steel parts but potentially harmful if used in engines with major aluminum parts, especially on wear surfaces. Experts at the American Petroleum Institute told TheCarConnection they were not familiar with the Ontario study. -Mike Davis

 
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03-19-05, 06:35 PM   #8  
Fortunatly for fireweedfour, he has the old, tough as nails cast iron pushrod engine. If the engine is only knocking when cold, under acell, it may be piston slap. Not uncommon on older 3.0l fords, & if you can live with the noise & take it easy untill the engine warms up, It'll last another 250k

 
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03-19-05, 07:57 PM   #9  
I drive an old 86 f150 with 197,000 miles on it. The best combinaiton I have found is 4 quarts of of either mobile one 10w30 or amsoil 10w30 along with one quart of lucas oil heavy duty oil treatment. With that combination I check the oil level at least once a week and I can go for at least few months with out having to add any. Also no matter what the temperature the truck fires right up and wants to run the lucas oil just sticks to everything real nice.

P.S.
Marvel Mystery oil is just a quart of crude oil straight from the ground. It has some useful elements to help remove deposts in the engine, but also some acids that will eat your seals. So If you choose to use it don't use it too often.

I have found that a good oil flush will remove more deposts than than marvel mystery oil can without harming your engine.

These are my experiences on the matter, Hope this helps.
R. Ellis

 
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03-20-05, 05:05 AM   #10  
Posted By: power453 P.S.
Marvel Mystery oil is just a quart of crude oil straight from the ground. It has some useful elements to help remove deposts in the engine, but also some acids that will eat your seals. So If you choose to use it don't use it too often.

I have found that a good oil flush will remove more deposts than than marvel mystery oil can without harming your engine.
Well, yes, the question was about a noise, possibly lifter tap
Lugnut likes to add Rislone, whereas I prefer MM Oil
Both work well as an additive to quite small valve train ticking
I have also used Rislone with success, but tend to have MM Oil around as it's the same stuff I use to lubricate my air tools

Absolutely a good flush can remove more deposits than MM Oil
Though for a ticking, I'd start with adding some R or MM to the engine oil first

 
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