Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

accidently drained R-134a - how to add?


ang0tti's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

04-05-05, 10:00 AM   #1  
ang0tti
accidently drained R-134a - how to add?

I wanted to learn about my car, but what I did was screw something up. I 'accidently, unscrewed something underneath my car and let out all of the a/c refrigerant. my a/c no longer blows cold. there is no leak or anything, I just accidently let out all of the refrigerant (probably a hole in the ozone above my house now). Anyway, since there is no leak or anything is it a fairly easy thing to just add R-134a? Can I buy some cans of the pressurized stuff and add it? Is there just one product that I hav to pick up a few cans of and add it in or is more complex. Thanks.

 
Sponsored Links
Ed Imeduc's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 18,389
MO

04-05-05, 10:10 AM   #2  
Check at any auto store or walmarts they all have a r134 kit that you can buy and refill it. With hose and all. Be sure and read how there first. R134 did not do your ozone in. Thats why you can buy it.. Its the chlorine in R 12 and R22
thats doing it. But just think about all the other chlorine that is use every day in other things.

ED

 
ang0tti's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

04-05-05, 10:14 AM   #3  
ang0tti
Hey man, thanks for the reply. It helps me a lot. If you have time, check at this link below.... would this be what I would be looking for?

http://pepboys.crossmediaservices.co...&L2CatID=13343

Again, thanks for the help and info.



Edit: Also, is there a standard amount that I have to put in, or a certain pressure? Would this information be found in my owners manual or does the product itself have directions. I have a 1996 Dodge Stratus ES.

 
Ed Imeduc's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 18,389
MO

04-05-05, 10:20 AM   #4  
That www. said it all tells you how to fill it. Just make sure you blow the hose out some before you put it on. So you dont put any AIR into the ac unit.

ED

 
ang0tti's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

04-05-05, 10:31 AM   #5  
ang0tti
Thanks again!

 
comp's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation

Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 76

04-05-05, 11:15 AM   #6  
just don't over fill, it can "slug" the compressor ( liq. instead of a gas)

 
ang0tti's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

04-05-05, 11:36 AM   #7  
ang0tti
Thanks for the advice man. I'm pretty inexperienced, but also broke, so if its worth it I want to add it myself like I said. Just not sure what is overfilling and what is underfilling. Many owners manual doesn't say how much to put in. I guess its a standard on most cars or the bottle of R-134a will tell me. Is it by volume or pressure or both?

 
comp's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation

Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 76

04-05-05, 12:25 PM   #8  
both,,,, system's use different amount's ..the older R-12 one's took 2-3 12oz cans,, but you need to look at the Library in the shop books if $$$$ are tight

 
bejay's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 2,538

04-05-05, 12:26 PM   #9  
there should be a sticker under the hood wich tells you how much the system holds in weight.
suggest seeing a shop for having it filled and to show them what you did to let the freon out. dont know what you may have undone to let all the freon escape but you likely lost alot of oil if you un did a line not to mention the oring may be damaged and need replaced.

 
ang0tti's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

04-05-05, 04:24 PM   #10  
ang0tti
What I did was used a wrench to take off this small hexagonal type bolt which when I unscrewed all the way turned out to be a pin-like object. As soon as I started to loosen I heard some pressure come out but I unloosend it all the way and then a bunch of pressurized refrigerant released (you could hear the pressure and see a vapor). I put the 'pin' back how it was. No liquids seemed to spill anywhere. The car drives fine and I tried the a/c and it won't blow cold.

thanks

 
BelairBoy's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

04-05-05, 05:06 PM   #11  
BelairBoy
some tips about freon:

it's heavier than air, so if it gets in your lungs you can actually drown in it.
At 1000F it goes through a chemical change and becomes a gas equivalent to mustard gas(note, a the tip of a cigarette can reach greater than 1000F)
it's colorless and odorless

Just a couple things to beware of if you're working with freon, it can be rough stuff, so I suggest leaving the a/c and refrigerator to the pros.

 
cuedude's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 348

04-05-05, 05:23 PM   #12  
Freon

This is all good stuff to know. And one thing I do know is not only can you drown in it, when/if it goes through it's Chemical change at 1000 Digrees, it changes or becomes Fosgene gas. Really nasty stuff. Don't know about 134 though. But, I do recommend a pro for this as it can be quite dangerous.

cuedude

 
hopkinsr2's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 1,561
Non-US

04-05-05, 09:23 PM   #13  
And remember to always wear SAFETY GOGGLES & GLOVES You'll go blind in a second if r-134 or r-12 gets in your eyes

 
GWIZ's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 719

04-06-05, 12:57 AM   #14  
If you let air into your system, you must have the air pumped out with a vacuum pump.
You may damage the system if you don't.
The moisture/air will freeze in the system.

 
carguyinva's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 1,147
VA

04-06-05, 05:24 AM   #15  
the best thing is...

...and i realize that dollars are tight but...if you let out all of the refrigerant, it needs to be evacuated before recharging with refrigerant. if you only let out some of the refrigerant, then you have no idea how much to put back in. either way, it seems most prudent to evac and recharge with the correct amount and be done with it.

as for phosgene gas, that what you get when you burn R-12...not R-134a

as for ozone depletion...the jury is still out on the overall atmospheric effects of 134...the concensus is that it's bad, but not as bad as R-12 was. it won't be long before you see another change in refrigerant gas to an even safer compound. there are CO2 systems in development, but they operate at such high pressures, there are safety and leakage issues yet to be resolved.

bottom line here is that a person with no knowledge of refrigeration probably shouldn't mess around with it...it's just too dangerous.

oh...and BTW...FREON was a trade name for R-12...FWIW

 
ang0tti's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

04-06-05, 07:36 AM   #16  
ang0tti
Yeah I came to the conlcusion that if I was dumb enough to screw around and let out all of the R-134a I probably shouldn't mess with it anymore

I'm so soooo broke! But I guess I can just NOT use the A/C at all until I get up some funds. I know its hard to estimate, BUT anybody got an idea how much it would cost to avacuate and recharge my system? Theres no leaks, I just accidently let out ALL of the refrigerant. I have a 1996 Dodge Stratus ES.

My car should be fine as long as I dont try and use the A/C until its fixed properly, right?

Thanks for the replies and helpful info guys. This was probably the most helpful and best information people have given me when I've posted questions on internet forums.

 
carguyinva's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 1,147
VA

04-06-05, 08:20 AM   #17  
labor...

...time guide says 1.4 hours.

multiply that times the hourly rate of the shop(s) and then add their cost for refrigerant and you have a good ballpark estimate

definately call around..some will be cheaper than others

 
comp's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation

Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 76

04-07-05, 11:16 AM   #18  
good info on safety

 
Search this Thread