Tire Help

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  #1  
Old 04-18-05, 05:35 AM
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Tire Help

Hey fellas, I need a little information here.

My 2003 Mazda Protege5 cam with Dunlop Tires as original equipment. The front passenger tires has a big bubble/bump/knot in the sidewall. I called a tire place and they told me it likely wouldn't be under warranty. Theysid it had something to do with impact brakes or something. What do you guys say and what was meant by impact brakes/braking? Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 04-18-05, 05:45 AM
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They are probably suggesting you hit a pothole. I've hit potholes numerous times and dented rims without harming the tire (I live in the Motor City, notorious for bad roads).

Sidewall bulges (or bubbles) are a tire defect. They can occur without hitting potholes or other such abuse. These guys you talked to are trying to brush you off. Pursue this further. You should not be resposible for a manufacturer's defect. You are only responsible for the portion of tread you used already, measured by tread depth. They will deduct that from the cost of a new tire.
 
  #3  
Old 04-18-05, 06:01 AM
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Hey, thanks for the prompt reply. I will head out to a Dunlop authorized dealer and see what kind of crap they try to give me. So, I'm guessing this impact brake thing must mean when you're ziping along and see a pothole so you brake and get that horrible pothole "wham!". Damn, I live in Brooklyn and do that all the time. I actually have a gouge taken out of the underside of my front bumper (it's a pretty low car) on the same side as my defective tire. I so should have sued the city to fix it (it is visible from the sidewalk, you don't have t look under the car to see it) but I supposed that would have taken some legal fees and I ust don't have the money. Anyway, thanks for the help, I'll keep trying different tire places 'til I get it replaced.
 
  #4  
Old 04-18-05, 10:04 AM
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So here's the verdict: The two places I went to, one listed as an Authorized Dunlop Dealer here in Brooklyn and the other Sears' automotive service center, both say it's pothole related. The guy at Sears even pointed out a black mark on the whell exactly where the Tire's bubble is. He says it is due to the tire rubbing against the wheel as it hit the offending pothole. I figure I could try taking some rubbing alcohol or some nail polish remover and wiping the mark off before I try another tire store. However, with this being New York City, I doubt any tire shop will say it's anything but a puthole related issue. Maybe I should drive far out of my way to a place where potholes aren't as much at issue and try but then I'd have to drive back again after they order the tire (because neither of the first two carry it in stock). BTW, this tire is expensive, the Authorized Dunlop place quoted $130 and Sears wants $170, $203 after taxes and labor. Frightening.
 
  #5  
Old 04-18-05, 10:33 AM
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FWIW, impact 'breaks' are exactly that - a 'break' in the inner sidewall of the tire caused by an impact - be it a pot hole, curb, whatever.
 
  #6  
Old 04-18-05, 04:09 PM
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I don't know what the hell FWIW means but I do know I had to shell out some serious bucks to replace my tired and I am upset. So apparently, everywhere I went, they agreed that my tire fell victim to potholes. The wall of the tire cracked and the air pressure inside caused a bubble to pertrude. I really don't buy that because, living in Brooklyn, there's a pothole every 200ft. All four of my tires would have had tire wall damage on several occasions due to the brutality of the roads in this sprawling metropolis. Personally I think tire companies should be ashamed of themselves for passing this off on the consumer (but that's another forum I'm sure). At any rate, here's the only good that's come of this. You CAN buy insurance for this sort of tire damage. It protects you against a number of pitfalls (pun intended) that can befall your tires. I paid $14.99 per tire. It's good for the life of the tire so I suggest if your tires are as expensive as mine are ($130-150 each) it's well worth getting when you buy new tires. The insurance is less if the tire is less than $100. If you get so much as a flat, they'll fix it for nothing (although a patch or plug is generally less than $10). Personally, I' going to drive the hell out of these tires so I can get my money's worth now. And in hindsight, I would've pursued this matter further seeing as how I'm sure the tire didn't hold up as the manufacturer intended. The shops can't prove it's an impact break and neither can the manufacturer. I just don't know the next channel to pursue outside of taking legal action (which I definitely can't afford).

My sincerest apologies for the ranting.
 
  #7  
Old 04-18-05, 05:16 PM
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For what it's worth (FWIW), in my almost 20 years as a mechanic, I never saw a sidewall failure in a tire due to a manufacturing defect. I've seen hundreds with pothole or curb (or who knows what else) caused impact breaks. That's not to say it doesn't happen, I just never saw it. I know exactly how it feels to have to replace an otherwise good tire because of one as well - dropped over 4 bills on my wife's car today. She was supposed to have them replaced Saturday and didn't, both fronts had breaks in them. RF blew on her last night. As far as the tire companies go, they offer what you apparently purchased - a road hazard warranty. Perhaps they would be a little less in cost if consumers would, heaven forbid, start taking responsibility for their own actions. It's also quite easy to prove an impact break in a shop, even easier in a lab. Be careful about "driving the hell out of those tires", obvious abuse will void your warranty.
 
  #8  
Old 04-18-05, 05:33 PM
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Very interesting. I'd like to know exactly how can anyone prove to me how the rupture on the inside of the tire wall occured? For all anyone knows it came about due to an irregularity in the manufacturing process whereby a small undetectable weakness was left in the reinforcements in the tire wall. Sure, adverse driving conditions are absolutely responsible for exploiting any irregularities or defects, but driving conditions reasonably vary. That's certainly what's expected. Convince me otherwise, I dare anyone. My circumstantial, and thereby, anecdotal evidence is the fact that I hit potholes every time I drive my car (they're unavoidable in this city) and for all it's worth my other three tires are fine. In fact, my tires have even maintained their air pressure through all they've been through (24K miles of varying seasons and adverse road conditions). I had a tire puncture once and that's the only time I ever had to add air (in this case I had the person who did the plug add the air) to one of my tires. I check the pressure eveytime I get ready to drive over 100 miles. I have a pretty reliable tire gauge. The tire with the bulge lost a little bit of air pressure also. Hmph.
 
  #9  
Old 04-18-05, 05:57 PM
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I'd like to know exactly how can anyone prove to me how the rupture on the inside of the tire wall occured?
I think you should of taken the fifth

The guy at Sears even pointed out a black mark on the whell exactly where the Tire's bubble is. He says it is due to the tire rubbing against the wheel as it hit the offending pothole
 
  #10  
Old 04-18-05, 06:14 PM
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Very astute Toyotaman, but I'm no where near convinced. Seriously, it was a black mark. My wheels are filled with marks and scuffs of all sorts. And I wiped the black mark off quite easily. I don't know how a black mark is proof that the manufacturer did not prepare an irregular product. But I'll give you credit nonetheless (it's pretty meaningless to me now after I bought the tire and insured it already). Thanks everyone... here's to tire manufacturers who stand by their products!!!
 
  #11  
Old 04-19-05, 06:17 AM
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question

Did this bubble just show up one day? The sidewall is the weak spot and I have hit a pothole and wiped out a tire.I now buy the road hazard warranty.
I had one tire that looked great on my truck and one day just sitting there the whole sidewall blew out.(dry rot)still had 3/4 life on thread.
 
  #12  
Old 04-19-05, 10:14 AM
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The bubble did indeed just one day show up. I wrote the folks at Dunlop an email yesterday, and a representative from their parent company, whomever they are, called me back. There's nothing they resolved to do, especially not since I already replaced the tire, but because they didn't ignore me nor replied with a generic email I respect them all the more. I must say I feel a little better about this whole thing now. That was nice of them is all. I told everything I wrote on here in my cumulative posts and she respectfully disagreed as did I. If I hadn't already shelld out $200 on a new tire, however, she was willing to appease me and give me credit for the amount of tread that didn't wear. Anyway, the moral of the story is buy the insurance when you buy new tires because the tire companies will not stand by their products.
 
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