Air Condition problem, won't take freon

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  #1  
Old 05-03-05, 07:41 PM
beeble
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Air Condition problem, won't take freon

I have a 94' Chevy Astro Van and began to replece the ac compressor. And once I removed the old compressor I found that it had some type of fluid in it that looked like anti-freeze. Why this was there is really confussing to me. But the thing is that once I flush the fluid from the system and re-installed the new compressor I began to refill with freon, only to find that it would not take the freon. It would fill the accumulator and stop. Can anyone tell me why this could happen and what to look for. Also, anyone know why there would be anti-freeze in the pump or what looks like anti-freeze. Or why someone would put it in there if it was done before I bought the van. Thanks for any info provided. THANKS !!
 
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  #2  
Old 05-03-05, 09:13 PM
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After flushing the System did you add the required pump oil back into the system ?
Did you evacuate the system with a vacuum pump before adding the freon ? (A must)
 
  #3  
Old 05-04-05, 04:54 AM
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that fluid...

...was the oil that the compressor needs to operate. it looked that color either from age or because it had dye in it for leak testing purposes. the exact amount of oil removed (you measure what you took out) must be put back in. if you flushed the entire system, then oil for the whole system must be replaced before operating the system. most systems hold roughly 8 ounces of oil in total. there is a spec for the type and amount that should be referred to.

and yes...you absolutely MUST evacuate the system before putting new refrigerant in. evacuating is when the system is put into a negative pressure (vacuum) for at least 30 mins to remove any moisture before charging. that negative pressure should be around 29 inches of mercury (give or take depending on your altitude).

PS...an accumulator replacement is advised anytime the system is opened to atmosphere for more than 30 mins or so. all good ac techsa replace the accumulator when doing a compressor job...

good luck
 
  #4  
Old 05-04-05, 03:57 PM
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Well, if the compressor was replaced because it grenaded, most of the debris would be in the orifice. I have never replaced an accumulator on anything, ever.....also, of course vacuuming the system is highly recommended, it can be done with out it. On an older vehicle, what difference is it gonna make....I mean lets be realistic.
 
  #5  
Old 05-04-05, 04:11 PM
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Originally Posted by bigguy05641
Well, if the compressor was replaced because it grenaded, most of the debris would be in the orifice. I have never replaced an accumulator on anything, ever.....also, of course vacuuming the system is highly recommended, it can be done with out it. On an older vehicle, what difference is it gonna make....I mean lets be realistic.
Ditto. The only times I have replaced accumulators was on some retro-fits. Now if the system was exposed to the atmosphere for a longer period of time, or in moist conditions, I can see the accumulator being replaced. As for evacuating, the only time I pull the vacuum for that amount of time is before charging a retro-fit.
 
  #6  
Old 05-05-05, 05:25 AM
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ok...let's be realistic

the purpose here is to help people...to give them the best chance for a successful DIY repair. they are potentially saving plenty of money by not taking their work to flat raters. i'll bet that compressor wasn't replaced in flat rate time and the system was open to atmosphere for longer than reasonable.

you say you have never replaced an accumulator? then you have no idea whether or not it would make a difference, in my meager 25 years (13 as a line tech for GM and 12 as an instructor) i've found it to be wise...perhaps that's because it's hot and humid in the mid-atlantic. either way...it's a good insurance part, esp for a DIYer.

as for evacuating? give me a break...you can't do it for too long. again, we're talking about a diy job here...not a job that needs to get out the door for whatever reason.

i guess my philosophy is this...give the lay people here advice that gives them the best chance at success, not just what they can get by with.
 
  #7  
Old 05-05-05, 06:23 PM
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Well, there's not too many lay people with a vacuum pump lying around, so I suggested, and will again, vacuuming can be lived with out.
And in my 17 years at the same dealer, cannot recall a mal-behaving a/c system because I didn't replace the accumulator.
I think what we have here is a case of "Book" mechanics, versus "real life" mechanics.
You surely cannot go wrong replacing an accumulator, but I'd rather have the couple hundred bucks in my wallet,thanks.
And of course vacuuming is recommended, but the average lay person is probly not about to plunk down six grand or what ever they are for an a/c machine.
 
  #8  
Old 05-06-05, 06:37 AM
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I think I have to step in before things get carried away.

Gentlemen I’m surprised no one asked what the gauge readings were.

Wouldn’t that be what you want to know if we were helping the poster correct his problem?

But instead we are having a ******* match about an accumulator and vac’ing the system
 
  #9  
Old 05-06-05, 09:53 AM
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would also need to know what all parts have been changed. along with pressure readings.
im sure that was likely oil that changed color from a leak detection dye.
wouldn't even think about changing a compressor without doing the accumulator and orfice tube along with it, have seen to many repeat failures by not changing the accumulator.
 
  #10  
Old 05-06-05, 06:51 PM
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it's about advice...sound advice

which is what i gave...JFTR...accumulators don't cost a couple hundred bucks nor did anyone suggest a 6000 dollar recycler to simply evacuate with. leaving air in the system is just plain bad advice...for anyone...period.


to the original poster...bejay is right. if the compressor was changed because it locked up or grenaded...an accumulator AND an orifice tube are necessary. in fact, a stopped up orifice tube could be why you couln't get it to take a charge. you also have my apologies for participating in a so called pissing match. i just wanted to help you get your a/c back working the best it can.
 
  #11  
Old 05-07-05, 04:48 AM
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I agree with the evacuation and the changing of parts that can collect debris. If it were my car no matter how old I’d vac it to remove the moisture and non-condensables to have the system work the best it can.

If a DIYer doesn’t have the tools or equipment (vacuum pump/gauge set/recovery machine) to perform the job properly and safely he/she should be advised of such. Without a recovery machine what do you do with the old freon, just vent it? For all we know he/she may just be using a charging hose blindly shooting freon in with no regard or knowledge of pressures. This can be dangerous to the poster.

But we are professionals attempting to help a DIYer solve his/her problem and keeping them from hurting themselves, others and the environment.

This thread doesn’t seem to accomplishing that goal and that was my attempt to steer it in a better direction.

If there is no response with further information from the original poster this post is going to be closed.
 
  #12  
Old 05-07-05, 06:24 AM
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MY mistake for engaging.
BUt toyota man brings something up that bugs me. And that is spending too much energy on a thread, where the original poster disappears off the face of the earth.

But a couple things I'd do if it's reluctant to take freon, try immersing the can into a bucket of hot water while you are adding the freon. Also, assuming you're adding to the low side, start the car and turn on the a/c, this might help as well. Give the freon can a shake every few minutes.
 
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