Intermittent Cold Air From AC

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  #1  
Old 07-09-05, 05:04 AM
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Intermittent Cold Air From AC

I have a 1988 T Bird with the 5.O litre V8 Im having a problem with the AC delivering cold air. I have converted it to R134A with a Kit and it does very well most of the time. But It seems that when I really need to blow out the hot car, it doesnt put ANY cold air out of the vents. My other car (1997 Dodge) will blast out the hot air with cold when I turn it on. Im thinking this is a mechaical or electrical problem rather than a freon problem. what to look for and where?
 
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  #2  
Old 07-09-05, 06:41 AM
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Originally Posted by WML13
Im thinking this is a mechaical or electrical problem rather than a freon problem. what to look for and where?
Only way to determine this is with a gauge set. I assume the compressor is engaging?
 
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Old 07-09-05, 02:37 PM
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I agree with PMG.
IF you did the retro yourself then you surely have a set of gages. Hook them up and let us know what the pressures are reading when you experience this problem. Also let us know what the compressor is doing.
Hope this helps ya,
Billy
 
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Old 07-09-05, 10:46 PM
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Originally Posted by billys68ss
I agree with PMG.
IF you did the retro yourself then you surely have a set of gages.


the sad thing is they have do it yourself retro kits everywhere, and many of them just have a can tapper hose with the quick connect fitting and no gauge. i havnt seen one yet that mentions you should check the pressures with a good manifold gauge set.
 
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Old 07-10-05, 05:12 PM
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Manifold guage

I didnt do the retro myself. The guy who did has a set of course. If it happens again I will have him look at it. At the moment it has been working fine with the extra freon I added. I guess Im going to have to take it to the next step and buy the guages, and train myself to use them. I suppose the gauges tell you if you are keeping the freon in by maintaining presure. Is there any danger involved in attaching the gauge assembly?
 
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Old 07-10-05, 05:16 PM
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Quick connect fitting

Where is the quick connect fitting for adding freon located on a 1998 Pontiac Grand Prix with the 3.8 litre V6?
 
  #7  
Old 07-10-05, 05:57 PM
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I dont particularly like retro "kits". The only way to do it correctly is to replace all Non-ferrous (rubber) line and the compressor and receiver dryer. The old R12 refrigerant had much larger molecular structure than the R134a refrigerant. What this boils down to is that the more dense refrigerant will easily escape from the lines of an R12 system solely based on the design of the day. If you were able to add refrigerant to your system, you either have a leak or you didnt get a proper charge in the first place. You can also overcharge the system. You will find out all too soon if this is the case. The refrigerant is going to have to go somewhere and its going to go "OUT" the point of least resistance. Its either going to go out where the previous refrigerant leaked from or its going to blow a seal. The reason for this is when you overcharge A/C systems you increase high side pressures. This will cause excessive pressure in the system and most likely cause a blow out. Hence the reason for gages when servicing A/C systems. A/C work is really not for the DIYer.

As for the service port on the 1998 Grand Prix... Follow the A/C lines from the compressor to the firewall. You should find the ports easily enough this way. The low side port, which is the port you charge into, is always the small fitting on the large line. The high side is the large fitting on the small line. It isnt possible without effort, but if you were to hook up a can of freon at the high side line it would be very dangerous. Just think of holding a grenade in your hand and releasing the pin. Not a pretty sight.
Good Luck.
Hope this is helpful to ya,
Billy
 
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