Torque on threads

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  #1  
Old 07-22-05, 09:39 PM
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Torque on threads

I have a simple question. How do you know how much torque to put on screw threads. I have a problem of stripping them out. Is there a simple way of looking at the male and female threads and determining if they can take enough torque. Thanks.
 
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Old 07-23-05, 12:16 AM
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To be honest, the question is not as simple as some may think. Even so, we can reduce the answer to focus on the material from which a fastener is made, and its size relative to the force being used to apply it, and any subsequent forces associated with load bearing.

The amount of torque a fastener can tolerate really depends on its overall size and the type of metal from which it is made. Here is a web site that describes identifiers for common bolts that may prove helpful: http://shopswarf.orcon.net.nz/boltid.htm

In a nutshell, the bigger the fastener and the harder the metal from which it is made, the stronger it is - and thus the more capable it is at handling torque and bearing loads.

If you are worried about stripping bolts and/or screws, I recommend using simple methods to avoid this, such as:

>drill pilot holes that reduce the need for exerting extra pressure when driving screws (this has the extra benefit of reducing splitting or otherwise damaging the material into which you are driving the screw);
> use a torque wrench for driving nuts and bolts.
> use the least possible force to secure the fastener properly.
>Remember Ben Franklin's advice - "haste makes waste". Slow down and get a sense of how the fastener "feels" as you drive or otherwise secure it.

Hope this helps a bit. Best wishes.
 
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Old 07-23-05, 05:56 AM
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If you're looking for calcualtions, try this site: http://www.engineersedge.com/Calulators_Online.shtml

If your looking for torque specs specific to a vehicle, most quality service manuals (Mitchell, Chilton's, etc.) will have them.
 
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