Replacing brake fluid


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Old 11-18-05, 07:31 PM
J
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Replacing brake fluid

I have a 1996 Suburban, 1998 Expedition and 1998 Tauris. All have the original brake fluid. From time to time I add some to keep the resevoir topped off. Should I replace the brake fluid? If so, what tips or suggestions do you have?

Thanks

John
 
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Old 11-18-05, 07:58 PM
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Usually every 4 years you want to replace the fluid in the system, or so they say, but most people dont do that. First, have the fluid tested for moisture content. Most shops will be able to figure it out for you, and it shouldnt be more than 5$ to have it done.

To flush the fluid, you need either a vacuum exhanger ($$$$$$$$$$) Pressure bleeder or vacuum bleeder. The pressure bleeder is the best method, next to the fluid exchanger. Basically, you open up all 4 bleed screws, hook up hoses, hook up the pressure bleeder and force new fluid through the entire system. A vacuum bleeder attatches to the bleeder screws and sucks the fluid out, not quite as good as the pressure bleeder though.

Jim
 
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Old 11-18-05, 08:23 PM
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Thanks Jim,

Can I suck all of the fluid out of the resevoir, put in new fluid and bleed each wheel or is that too labor intensive?

John
 
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Old 11-18-05, 08:54 PM
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It wouldnt give you very good results. When you push the brake pedal, the master cylinder sucks in fluid from the reservior, but when you release, fluid goes back into the reservior, so even though youd be moving fluid through the system, it would still be getting mixed together. If you have a friend with a pressure bleeder, fill it up and go to town. They run about $100+adapters, so I dont think its really a good investment considering how little it will be used.


Jim
 
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Old 11-19-05, 06:27 AM
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Can I suck all of the fluid out of the resevoir, put in new fluid and bleed each wheel or is that too labor intensive?
That method will work with good results, just keep bleeding at each wheel till fluid is clear and clean.
 
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Old 11-19-05, 09:04 AM
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I agree with Larry. This is the method I use for all my cars. On some cars there is enough room to crawl under and bleed the brakes (with a helper in the driver's seat). This'll save you from jacking up the car and removing each wheel. I recommend doing this every 2 years. 1/4 of a quart per wheel should exchange the fluid in the system.
 
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Old 11-21-05, 01:58 PM
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I change mine every 1-2 years. Firt thing you want to do is get a MityVac. That way you can suck out the contents of the reservior and replace with new before you even start bleeding the brakes. That will save a ton of time. Then when you go to bleed the brakes (with other person pumping the brakes) you use it again so you don't make a mess. I put the end of the vacuum hose right on the bleed screw and use vacuum to get the fluid.
 
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Old 11-21-05, 03:24 PM
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Thanks,

Sounds like that will save time and from making a mess.
 
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Old 11-21-05, 04:12 PM
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Don't you have start bleeding at the furthest wheel from the resevoir and start working at each wheel closest toward the master cylinder?
 
 

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