Chevy Blazer fuel line leak

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Old 01-12-06, 01:10 PM
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Chevy Blazer fuel line leak

Ive got a 1989 Chevy Blazer and its got a gas leak close to the tank in the fuel line going from the tank to the fuel filter. Its a small pinhole type leak I guess I could cut the line into and clamp a rubber hose to it but the entire line is very rusty. Do they sell a metal fuel line or would it be better to replace the entire line with rubber hose? Thanks for advise Dwight
 
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Old 01-12-06, 04:30 PM
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metal

I would use the metal tube lasts alot longer and your system is under pressure.
 
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Old 01-12-06, 06:00 PM
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Originally Posted by dlangdado
Ive got a 1989 Chevy Blazer and its got a gas leak close to the tank in the fuel line going from the tank to the fuel filter. Its a small pinhole type leak I guess I could cut the line into and clamp a rubber hose to it but the entire line is very rusty. Do they sell a metal fuel line or would it be better to replace the entire line with rubber hose? Thanks for advise Dwight
This is a common problem with any vehicle early and late model. most aftermarket places have either steel or nylon repair lines along with fittings available that can replace a piece of fuel line so that you don't have to go to the dealer and spends hundreds of dollars to replace a broken or leaking line
 
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Old 01-12-06, 06:51 PM
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if its a tbi motor should be no problem, the pressure isnt to high for rubber hose, i did it on my 89 s10 i just cut the line, roughed up the ends to grip the rubber and double clamped each end, just make sure you get fuel injection hose not carberated
 
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Old 01-13-06, 02:30 PM
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I don't like the sound of it. Rubber lines are designed to be installed on 'clean, smooth' 'like new' lines. If you clean the line first, and you can get it 'feeling' and looking new, then go for it. Try sanding it to see what happens.

Also, as mentioned, be sure you buy the high pressure fuel line. Most auto parts carry both and the low pressure line is not a substitute.

A better solution is to locate the nearest fuel connectors, then buy that piece of line from the dealer(expensive) or a generic line from local auto parts.

For generic line, measure your line length, bends and all, then buy that length from the auto parts store, bend it yourself. The parts store line is sold with the fuel fittings already installed on each end, which is good because they are double flared fittings. Also be sure you are buying fuel line and not brake line, and for american cars, which is different than european cars. Fear not, just accurately measure the diameter of your old line and size of fittings. Be sure new parts are the same dimensions.
 
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