Pinion seal leaking

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-16-06, 05:35 PM
HairyKnuckle's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 77
Pinion seal leaking

I have a 2001 4x4 Ford Ranger and I was under it the other day to repalce my fuel filter when I noticed the bottom of the front diff all wet. It looks like the pinion seal is leaking.

I do my own filter changes and brakes but this seal is probably more than I want to attack. My question: What do I ask the garages where I am considering taking it to "qualify" them? I would like to know that they are doing it right. It seems a series of torque settings need to be taken before and after the seal is replaced. Do they have to replace anything else besides the seal if they take this shaft apart? I read about some crushable washers in some other threads. When would these need to be replaced?

How much time would a good mechanic take to do this change? What would I expect to pay?


Thanks for any input.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-16-06, 06:44 PM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: luther Michigan
Posts: 15
do it ur self

hey fords are easy to work on and it is most likely a piston ring but could be a head gasket. but It don't take much to do that if you have some mechanical skill. we know you know somthing about vwechls so be carful but I would take to a dealer to get a free inspwection and they will tell u what it is.
 
  #3  
Old 03-16-06, 09:09 PM
LouBazooka's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 553
Originally Posted by HairyKnuckle
I have a 2001 4x4 Ford Ranger and I was under it the other day to repalce my fuel filter when I noticed the bottom of the front diff all wet. It looks like the pinion seal is leaking.

I do my own filter changes and brakes but this seal is probably more than I want to attack. My question: What do I ask the garages where I am considering taking it to "qualify" them? I would like to know that they are doing it right. It seems a series of torque settings need to be taken before and after the seal is replaced. Do they have to replace anything else besides the seal if they take this shaft apart? I read about some crushable washers in some other threads. When would these need to be replaced?

How much time would a good mechanic take to do this change? What would I expect to pay?


Thanks for any input.
Don't jump ahead so quickly, you have to take it for an inspection so you're sure it is what you think it is, a qualified shop should be able to give you an accurate diagnostic at a fair price,shop around brand name places,they're usually backed from corporate offices who do not want bad publicity. Try Sears,Gemini,Gemini. etc.
 
  #4  
Old 03-16-06, 10:04 PM
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 361
About1-2 hours plus parts ,labor. (This is just my opinion.)
 
  #5  
Old 03-17-06, 01:25 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 5
The seal cost about $16.
The hard part is getting it out.
You'll have to remove the driveshaft from the front yoke. Leaving it connected to the transfer case as it's not really much in the way.
The bolts on the saddles look like Torx, but there're not. A 12 point standard box wrench fits them.
Pry the driveshaft away from the front yoke after you remove the saddle bolts, and after you do that, pick up all the little needle bearing you drop, along with the two needle bearing cups.

Now you have the pinion nut, which holds the yoke onto the pinion. It's a bear sometimes to take off, good luck! I think its a 23mm or 24mm nut.

Take off the yoke, then you'll be at the seal.
It too is a bear to take off, I like to use a seal puller, looks like a big fishing hook, kind-of.

Take your time, and maybe a flat piece of metal, like the side of a hammer, and using another hammer, get the new seal in.

Then slide the yoke back in, the yoke nut, which should be tightened to the proper drag, or just tighten it till your happy.

Get the driveshaft back on, with clean and regreased needle bearings and caps.

Before you drive, refill the rear/front end with 80/90 weight gear oil.

There, a do it yourself.
 
  #6  
Old 03-17-06, 04:56 PM
swirly_commode
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
alot of pinions are adjustable with a crush sleave. if your vehicle has one, then it will need to be replaced and the depth properly set. torqueing the pinion doesnt always do it. sometimes youll need to observe the pattern of the teeth with crayon marks to make sure they are meshing properly.

alot of auto shops wont even mess with pinions and ring gears because of the pain it is to reset everything. when you find a shop that agrees to tackle the job you can probably ask them if resetting the lash is part of the job or an extra charge. if they give you a funny look and obviously dont know what you are talking about, go somewhere else. if they want to charge extra, go somewhere else.

youre prolly looking about 3hrs labor plus parts. most shops charge by a standard labor guide. alldata or mitchell are the common ones. either or both of those might have a website with more info on labor times.
 
  #7  
Old 03-18-06, 05:05 AM
HairyKnuckle's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 77
Thank you to all whom responded. I have enough info to appear educated. I will take it around for some estimates. I don't have metric sockets that big and I don't want to be on my back under the truck up on jack stands if that much torque is required for the pinion nut.
 

Last edited by HairyKnuckle; 03-18-06 at 05:19 AM.
  #8  
Old 03-18-06, 09:16 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Livonia, Michigan
Posts: 923
I replaced the pinion seal on the rear end of my 71 Cutlass last year. Such a job is mostly nuts and bolts. Like slagking and swirly suggested, the tricky part is to set the preload on the bearing. If this isn't done properly, you could be seeing an early bearing failure shortly afterward.
 
  #9  
Old 03-24-06, 08:29 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 269
Originally Posted by swirly_commode
alot of pinions are adjustable with a crush sleave. if your vehicle has one, then it will need to be replaced and the depth properly set. torqueing the pinion doesnt always do it. sometimes youll need to observe the pattern of the teeth with crayon marks to make sure they are meshing properly.

alot of auto shops wont even mess with pinions and ring gears because of the pain it is to reset everything. when you find a shop that agrees to tackle the job you can probably ask them if resetting the lash is part of the job or an extra charge. if they give you a funny look and obviously dont know what you are talking about, go somewhere else. if they want to charge extra, go somewhere else.

youre prolly looking about 3hrs labor plus parts. most shops charge by a standard labor guide. alldata or mitchell are the common ones. either or both of those might have a website with more info on labor times.
The crush sleeve has nothing to do with pinion depth or back lash or tooth pattern! You are not changing these adjustments at all if you replace a pinion seal. Pinion depth is set with shims. The crush sleeve it there to pre-load the pinion bearing only. The technician doing the repair does need to be concerned with the pinion bearing pre-load when the job is done. This pre-load is often determined by measuring the pinion rotating torque with an inch-pound torque wrench. My experience shows that there is often times enough life left in the crush sleeve to allow you to dial the pre-load back to specs. I have replaced many pinion seals without replacing the crush sleeve. (Your results may vary but I doubt it)
 
Reply


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 11:04 AM.