Radiator plug-up

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-22-06, 02:13 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: San Francisco Peninsula
Posts: 121
Radiator plug-up

I recently needed to have my radiator replaced because it was full of mineral deposits and other particles and dirt from the water. Why ist it that distilled water is not used in radiators, which doesn't have any minerals and other particles? At about $2 a gallon, it would not be that expensive.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-22-06, 04:12 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: CANADA
Posts: 109
Most premixed coolant usually incorporates those ingredients.For a cheaper alternative, buy a gallon of distilled water and mix your own.
 
  #3  
Old 03-23-06, 05:23 AM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,320
I only use distilled water for engine coolant
 
  #4  
Old 03-23-06, 07:16 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Livonia, Michigan
Posts: 923
Hukre, I'm assuming you're asking this question of the previous owners. A lot of backyard mechanics seem surprised when they're told that distilled water should be used in the cooling system. I can only imagine the manufacturer uses distilled or demineralized water for factory fill. I'm not so sure of the dealers.
 
  #5  
Old 03-23-06, 12:36 PM
BuzzCut
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Originally Posted by hukre
I recently needed to have my radiator replaced because it was full of mineral deposits and other particles and dirt from the water. Why ist it that distilled water is not used in radiators, which doesn't have any minerals and other particles? At about $2 a gallon, it would not be that expensive.
57 cents a gallon at wal-mart in GA
 
  #6  
Old 03-23-06, 01:29 PM
Pendragon's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: USA
Posts: 1,839
Originally Posted by hukre
I recently needed to have my radiator replaced because it was full of mineral deposits and other particles and dirt from the water. Why ist it that distilled water is not used in radiators, which doesn't have any minerals and other particles? At about $2 a gallon, it would not be that expensive.
FWIW, you could have had the radiator boiled out for probably half (or less) of the cost of a new radiator.

And distilled water IS suppose to be used in radiators, most people just don't understand the need for it.
 
  #7  
Old 03-23-06, 08:47 PM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 18,717
I use distilled, 58 cents a gallon at my walmart in WI.
 
  #8  
Old 03-23-06, 08:53 PM
LouBazooka's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 553
Originally Posted by hukre
I recently needed to have my radiator replaced because it was full of mineral deposits and other particles and dirt from the water. Why ist it that distilled water is not used in radiators, which doesn't have any minerals and other particles? At about $2 a gallon, it would not be that expensive.


How old is this car ? using distilled vs. tap water would only make a tiny imperceptible difference when properly mixed 50/50 ( or as needed ) with coolant/antifreeze under normal conditions, all rads go bad after so many years of service, make sure you have no leaks and keep cap on recovery tank.
 
  #9  
Old 03-24-06, 05:54 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Livonia, Michigan
Posts: 923
I'm guessing here, but I can't imagine that there's enough minerals in a single charge of coolant (or even multiple charges after a number of years of coolant changes) mixed with tap water to scale a radiator. There probably was a leak in the system and it was continuously topped off with tap water to produce the scale present in the system.
 
  #10  
Old 03-24-06, 12:36 PM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 2,538
while a plugged or restricted radiater doesnt occur all that often, im sure that it is atleast partially contributed to the water used in the cooling system tap water can vary alot from being hard or soft and im sure in some areas using distilled water would probably be a good idea. but most radiators are replaced for leaks, and due to construction may not be repairable. so I would think that you are not gaining a whole lot by using distilled water and for most people it isnt going to increase the life of the radiator.
 
  #11  
Old 03-24-06, 12:57 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Livonia, Michigan
Posts: 923
Bejay, I think minerals in the water do more than just place deposits inside the radiator. They also wreak havoc with the coolant chemistry, which can reduce the corrosion inhibition of the antifreeze.
 
  #12  
Old 03-27-06, 07:05 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: San Francisco Peninsula
Posts: 121
Thanks to all who replied to my question. As I looked into it some more, I realized that all the shop manuals and owner manuals I have say to use water, no reference to distilled water; and all the gas stations I know of which have air and water service certainly don't use distilled water. And our local Ford dealer uses plain water. However, I will be using distilled water from now on, after the radiator shop showed me the insides of some radiators which were almost completely plugged up by mineral deposits.
 
  #13  
Old 03-27-06, 07:39 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 19
What vehicle is this? Is this a GM vehicle with DEX-COOL because if you have a blazer/jimmy the radiator clogging is supposed to happen with dex-cool. I have seen it also on some other passenger cars. But always with blazers and jimmys. Some people are actually trying to put together a class action suit against GM for dex-cool clogging radiators.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes