Runing on used french fry grease

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  #1  
Old 05-24-06, 03:54 PM
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Runing on used french fry grease

Anybody else heard of running cars on used restaurant grease?

Sounds like a great alternative to gas. Could present some problems here in Canada during the winter. The grease would get quite thick and probably mess up the fuel pump and filter.

Anybody got ideas on how to convert a 2001 Saturn SL1 to run on this alternative fuel source.

Thanks

Ted
 
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Old 05-24-06, 04:06 PM
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Unless your Saturn is diesel, your out of luck. The system works with two tanks. Start the diesel engine, it heats the tank of grease and when up to temp, you switch over to that tank. You can google "grease conversions" for a few manufacturers of these systems. I don't think you'll be able to sue McDonalds if your vehicle gets overweight though.
 
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Old 05-24-06, 08:51 PM
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yeah, and the grease needs to be filtered first, your car will not run on french fry chips and pieces of breading that broke free of the chicken nugget. With gas prices so high, people get irrational about alternative fuels. I was laughing a few months ago when they had a brief news segment saying that old grease could be used as a fuel, and they showed the reporter pouring dirty deep fryer grease into the gas tank. Maybe I should have watched it the next night to see if they showed the best place to get a fuel filter, pump and injectors changed. lol
 
  #4  
Old 05-24-06, 09:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Ted Heissner
Anybody else heard of running cars on used restaurant grease?

Sounds like a great alternative to gas. Could present some problems here in Canada during the winter. The grease would get quite thick and probably mess up the fuel pump and filter.

Anybody got ideas on how to convert a 2001 Saturn SL1 to run on this alternative fuel source.

Thanks

Ted

You'd have to convert the used grease to biodiesel first this requires equipment as well as knowledge of what you're doing, also the fact that the grease maybe from more than one type of vegetable oil makes matters more complicated,as different oils ( say corn and canola ) have diff. chemical structures.
Once you have the biodiesel you can use in on your diesel engine but I think you need to do certain mods to the fuel system on your engine as well before you can use it biodiesel on it.
 
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Old 05-24-06, 11:13 PM
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google "biodiesel" and you'll find dozens of sites to explore on the topic. There are many "DIYers" making the stuff at home.

Commercially, biodiesel is primarily manufactured by large, dedicated refiners - mainly in Europe. However, two new biodiesel refineries will go on line next year here in Washington State. Total production between the two plants will be around 165 million barrels per year.

You don't have to "convert" the engine to run it on biodiesel, but you might need to make some adjustments and you should check a few things.

Petroleum diesel leaves a lot of dirt in the tank and the fuel system. Biodiesel is a good solvent -- it tends to free the dirt and clean it out. Be sure to check the fuel filters regularly at first. Start off with a new fuel filter.

If a vehicle has been left standing for a long time with petroleum diesel fuel in the tank the inside of the tank may have rusted (water content is a common problem with petro-diesel fuel). Biodiesel will free up the rust, and it could clog the particle filter inside the tank. At worst the car simply stops, starved of fuel. It's not a very common problem, but it happens.

A common warning is that biodiesel, especially 100% biodiesel, will rot any natural or butyl rubber parts in the fuel system, whether fuel lines or injector pump seals, and that they must first be replaced with resistant parts made of Viton. But rubber parts in diesel engine fuel systems have been rare or non-existent since the early 1980s -- it seldom happens, and when it does happen it's not catastrophic, you have plenty of warning and it can be fixed.

The trick is to research the topic throughly, and even talk to people who understand the science and the process. Like any project, be prepared to invest in the tools and equipment you need to be safe and successful. Biodiesel itself is not toxic, but the process does involve the use of chemical catalyst that are, so respect the chemistry.

Rick
 
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