88 camry le just died while idling

Reply

  #1  
Old 06-21-06, 06:13 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 155
88 camry le just died while idling

Hi,

My 88 Camry LE, 185K, just died while I was waiting at a red light on my way to work. The car had been sitting for several days without being driven.

The car cranked several times so I don't think it is the battery or alternator. The starter seemed fine too. I replaced the fuel filter three weeks ago. I checked the EFI fuse and it was ok.

Then I checked for sparks and there was no sparks. There was oil and water in the distributor cap!

Please help me with why there is water and oil in the distributor cap and is this a job for DIY or should I bring it to the dealer. I had a bad experience with an independent shop once for electrical problems.

What parts should I buy and about how much are they?

Thank you very much.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 06-21-06, 06:20 AM
the_tow_guy's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: SW Fla USA
Posts: 11,531
Have you ever replaced the timing belt? If not, 185k would be well past when it could break. With distributor cap off crank it and make sure the rotor (the center piece under the distributor cap) is rotating. If it doesn't turn - broken timing belt. Oil and water under the cap could be from leaking oil seal where the distributor mounts to the head (oil) and possibly just condensation (water).
 
  #3  
Old 06-21-06, 07:11 AM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: North Texas
Posts: 2,345
good place to start

The tow guy is right on I would also suspect the belt first. Does the starter seem to spin faster then normal?. Also the O ring needs replaced.
On a good note I am 98% sure your engine is not a self destuction type Like many Honda cars. so it will be just a matter of replacing belt.
 
  #4  
Old 06-22-06, 03:31 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 155
Ok, I checked and the timing belt is not broken and it is craking. What else might be the problem? Thanks a lot.
 
  #5  
Old 06-22-06, 03:46 PM
New guy's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 435
Check the ignition module (igniter).
 
  #6  
Old 06-22-06, 03:57 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 338
He means pull the plug wires and crank to see if you are getting spark
 
  #7  
Old 06-22-06, 04:31 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 155
We did that too and there's no sparks. thanks.
 
  #8  
Old 06-22-06, 04:51 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 338
Now you need to look into cam or crank sensor which ever you have. Coil pack (measure resistance), and the ignition module(ignitor).

These are your next most common candidates.

There is certain automotive parts stores that begin with P that can test your ignition module for free.
 
  #9  
Old 06-22-06, 06:03 PM
davzack's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 304
A DIY'er is capable of performing this repair. The oil and water in the distributor is probably from two different sources. The water may have entered the cap from outside due to the cap not sealing correctly with the distributor body. The oil probably came in from a bad o-ring seal at the base of the distributor shaft (inside the engine).

The question now is how much damage, if any, you have sustained to your distributor. It may just be possible to clean out the distributor w/ an aerosol electrical parts cleaning solution...letting it dry thoroughly and then reinstalling the rotor and cap. Don't forget to remove the plastic cover under the rotor button and cleaning under there too. This does nothing to fix your problem though...you are only adressing the symptoms. If it works however, you can complete the repair by installing a new o-ring on the distributor shaft and maybe using some silicone sealant around the edge of the cap to keep out water.

The other possibility is that you have damaged the internal components of your distributor...ignition control module, ignition coil, pickup (camshaft position sensor), etc. That will probably require the assistance of an automotive technician. If you want to skip that...you could always install a new distributor instead of diagnosing which particular component has been damaged. It's a fairly easy repair. The cost of a new distributor can be quite substantial ($160 - $369) depending on engine size, whether you want a new or remanufactured distributor, etc.
 
  #10  
Old 06-22-06, 06:27 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 338
coil pack lol my bad obviously didn't pay that close of attention to the age.

Get the parts from the junk yard way cheaper, especially since there is no moving parts this a perfect candidate for junk yard parts.

Agree investigate distributor hanging off the side top of the motor.

Luckily that means you have no cam or crank sensor.

But you do have an ignition coil.
 
  #11  
Old 06-23-06, 01:37 AM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: North Texas
Posts: 2,345
check for spinning

Belts do not always break teeth come off and it appears normal.You must verify that the distributer is going around.
I had one go and it looked ok but the teeth were all laying on the bottom once I pulled it out.
(The timing belt is under some covers and not to be confused with the fan belts.)
 

Last edited by michael van; 06-23-06 at 01:51 AM.
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'