92 Camry A/C recharge

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  #1  
Old 06-21-06, 03:33 PM
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92 Camry A/C recharge

Is this a DIY job? The Camry has been retrofitted with the R-13 refrigerant. Is this something I can recharge myself, and what does it entail? I see the cans of R-13 at Autozone, so I figure it can be done. I just don't want to get in over my head.

Thanks!

Pecos
 
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  #2  
Old 06-21-06, 03:38 PM
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You mean r134


you can do it your self they even have bottles that have gauges on them that show green yellow red depending on how much freon is in the system. Also recharge it with a freon that has a UV dye in it so if it leaks out again you can get a uv light to try to find it

It entails taking the hose popping it on the port of the ac line (low side it will only fit one any ways) and the opening a valve or pressing a button while the frigerant goes in. You do this with the car running and the AC on

The sales person at autozone can tell you everything its way easier than changing oil and a lot less messier its basically like filling a tire with air. Put some in check the pressure repeat till you have gotten where the gauge says ok.
 
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Old 06-21-06, 03:43 PM
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Also you will want to put some stop leak in, that stuff for A/C is the shizznit as long as it is not the compressor seal leaking. The stuff goes in the system and stays a liquid then when there is a leak it reacts with the moisture in the air from the leak to harden around small leaks. It will not work on what is called moving seal leaks. such as the compressor seal on the shaft
 
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Old 06-21-06, 04:18 PM
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Thanks very much guys! Amazing response time too!

Pecos
 
  #5  
Old 06-22-06, 02:36 AM
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if you dont have a set of manifold guages at the very least, would suggest you let a shop recharge the a/c and it can often require more equipment such as a vcum pump also.
while you can go buy the can with the little guage on it and get lucky and it work for a while you could also damge the system by overcharging or you may have other problems that cant be detected by a guage reading low side pressure only.
 
  #6  
Old 06-22-06, 05:48 AM
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Don't let bejay scare you they have idiot proof ways of charging this system now. No need for a manifold anymore. You will see once you get to the parts store. They ways to charge are so easy even my girl friend is doing it. All she knows is you want the needle to be in the upper portion of the green and thats the extent of her a/c knowledge. Stop leak won't work for her because her compressor has a small leak. Which I will replace some time

just like filling a tire fill some and check. you only need one gauge to top the system off. Be sure to check the pressure before you first add any.
 
  #7  
Old 06-22-06, 10:58 AM
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The problem comes in if you have a restriction and the low side is looking just fine but the high side is skyrocketing and you rupture a hose. I see it happen more often than you would think.

You can't properly charge any hvac system with just the lowside gauge.
 
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Old 06-22-06, 11:25 AM
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Then you should write to the companies that make the kits sold at the stores and tell them that you should not be telling people to charge A/C system this way becuase it risks rupturing hoses.

Still cheaper to repair a ruptured hose than to pay a mechanic to service the system. Shop labor is up to $100 an hour. Ha at that rate its cheaper to pay the $25 for the epa cert then buy a $130 vacuum pump, and a manifold for $50. The tools would have payed themselves off with less than your car being in the shop for 2 hours.

Worse comes to worse the high pressure release opens or the hose ruptures and lets all the freon out.
 
  #9  
Old 06-23-06, 12:18 AM
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I would not recommend doing it without a manifold guage set. Although many people do, it is just not a good idea. I would also advise against products that stop leaks if you are keeping the car for a while. They can gum up things, plug your orfice tube, ect. If you need to recharge your system you should probably figure out why it needs recharged. Do you have a leak somewhere? Is your compressor clutch engaging. And if the system has seen any air, it needs to be vaccumed out before being filled.
 
  #10  
Old 06-23-06, 12:22 AM
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ohh, and another thing, if you are judging that the freon needs recharged by the cool air blowing in your car, you need to remember that everything has its pros and cons. Although 134a is much more environmentally friendly than r12, it is much less efficient, and you system was designed for r12, so your cooling performance will not be as good with the retrofit, even if it is fully charged.

Good luck
 
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