Oil in tires via air compressor?

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  #1  
Old 06-26-06, 06:58 AM
JHP
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Oil in tires via air compressor?

I know very little about car engines but since everyone else here does I registered to get an opinion I can depend on. In order to keep my family's tires at the proper presssure I just purchased a very high quality digital pressure guage and a Sears Craftsman 1 HP air compressor. This is the compressor I got:

http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/produ...id=00915310000

If the link does not work it is a 1 HP machine with a 3 gallon tank. I paid $125 for it.

I have never used an air compressor before and I wanted one that would provide enough "juice" to do the tires. I have 2 questions.

1. It uses oil. Do I have to worry about oil residue getting into the tires when I add air? I read somwhere on the Net that this could possibly happen.

2. When I add air, do I keep it running or do I run it to build up pressure then turn it off and use the pressurized air. I really do not understand the concept of the tank. If I run the pressure up to say 80 (it goes to 125 I guess) is that enough to supply the air I need to add a few pounds in each tire?

Sorry for the ignorance but I just have no experience in these areas.
 
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  #2  
Old 06-26-06, 07:32 AM
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#1 - there shouldn't be any problem with oil residue. I doubt any oil would be present in the air and if there was it wouldn't be enough to harm anything.

#2 - First let the tank build up some pressure [atleast 75psi], let it continue to run [it will cycle on and off if neccesarry]

Be sure to drain the tank when you are done using the compressor for the day, this will remove any water in the tank - which the air compressor produces while building pressure. If you use any air tools be sure to oil them before use.
 
  #3  
Old 06-26-06, 07:38 AM
JHP
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Thanks for the info. I used it yesderday to put a few PSIs in each tire. Only took abut 30 - 45 seconds per tire so i was happy with that. But when I opened the tank drain no water came out, only some residual air. Is that unusual? I probably only ran it for 3-5 minutes total.
 
  #4  
Old 06-26-06, 07:59 AM
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Both air humidity and the lenght of time the air compressor runs determines how much moisture will be produced. Water won't necesarily be expelled everytime but it is a good practice to drain the tank after use.
 
  #5  
Old 06-26-06, 08:57 AM
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No oil will get in the tires as long as the compressor motor is not broken.

Also when it comes to draining water out of the tank you will read how crazy people are about it. I drain my compressor about once a month or once every 3 weeks.

If your compressor has one of those twist valves on the bottom don't be surprised if it seizes up.

You can get a new one for around $5 at a hardware store.
It will seize up never had a twist valve that didn't.

I just use 1/4 piping and a 90deg elbow plumb in a 1/4" valve.
 
  #6  
Old 06-26-06, 10:15 AM
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If you are concerned, you can get an after filter for the discharge line. Many compressors use an oiler on the discharge line to lubricate air powered tools.

Think about the number of oil slicks your tires have driven through or sat in. Should be no problem.
 
  #7  
Old 06-26-06, 11:47 AM
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Your compressor doesn't have oil in the charge line. In case that wasn't clear.
 
  #8  
Old 06-26-06, 12:25 PM
JHP
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I do not know what the "charge line" is. Are you sayig that there is no way oil will get mixed in with the air with my particular model?

By the way, thanks to all for taking the time to respond.
 
  #9  
Old 06-26-06, 12:43 PM
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Yes no way, unless your pump is broken, which it will then do nothing.

charged means air coming out of the compressor.
 
  #10  
Old 06-26-06, 01:37 PM
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most all air compressors are lubricated with oil however it shouldnt consume hardly any oil there is probably a little dipstick to check the oil level with if its using alot of oil there is something wrong with the compressor.
 
  #11  
Old 06-26-06, 03:30 PM
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The main reason for bleeding air out of the the tank is to remove water which over time will create rust which is neither good for the tank or tools it powers. Since small tanks are small it is good practice to bleed them every day/use. Climate also plays a part, when I lived in fla my comp produced a lot of water [needed draining at least every day] Here in E Tn it isn't as critical.

I still bleed my 12 gal tank after each use. My 60 gal tank gets bled every week, more often if I use it a lot.
 
  #12  
Old 06-26-06, 03:38 PM
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I knew that someone that was crazy about bleeding tanks would appear see.

I have worked in autoshops where they had the gigantic tanks and we bleed them maybe once every few years we would always get about 6-8 gallons of water. Thats how a lot of older shops are with their air tanks. Newer compressors for shops have auto bleeds after each time the compressor turns off because almost no auto shops bleed tanks.

Bleed as you please if you don't its not that big of a deal as it is portrayed to be.
 
  #13  
Old 06-26-06, 07:00 PM
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number one you shouldn't need to pump air in any tire just for no reason, if tire is leaking air have it repaired.
number two if you have such a lack of automotive care knowledge as to not know how to operate an air compressor, don't mess with it and have the guys at the quick lube do it ,they should check your tire pressure everytime you do an oil change there. ( as well as all fluid levels and air filter element condition ).
I agree with post above water or no water who cares ? it'll be minimal if any at all.
I have a sears old fashion air compressor ( the one with the electric motor and a belt ) and I have never drained it nor have I had any trouble with it.
 
  #14  
Old 06-26-06, 08:09 PM
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[QUOTE=LouBazooka]number one you shouldn't need to pump air in any tire just for no reason, if tire is leaking air have it repaired.
number two if you have such a lack of automotive care knowledge as to not know how to operate an air compressor, don't mess with it and have the guys at the quick lube do it ,
QUOTE]

First thing he says I agree. You should look into why it is leaking maybe you need bead sealer. tire pressures change a lot when ever there is 10deg or more temp changes which would bring concern to some for constant tire pressure monitoring.

The second statement is where I draw the line between good mechanics and bad. A statement like telling someone not to learn to use an air compressor is childish stupid. I gurantee this a shop mechanic that would say that. I have dealt with people like him my whole life, you have to start learning some where and people like him you just push in a corner and say do your work don't talk to people we don't care for your opinion plus he will never make it any where huge with statements like that not even in professional racing. There they just say I can't tell you because usually the line is to competitive of a field or thats secret for our team.


Believe it or not this guy once had someone show him how to work an air compressor how do you think he learned. Some taught him first hand probably, and you don't have some one there to teach you, that is why this website is here with us.

I can remember many many many moons ago when I was really young and fit when I got my first compressor and wasn't 100% knowledgable about it, ya the good old days.

You have to start some where with cars and there is a lot of people with attitudes like that you just blow off and say what ever grow up you grumpy old man.

PS also look in the door jam for a sticker with the tire pressures in case you didn't know that.

He also doesn't understand that some people do more unimportant things in their lives before learning to use a compressor. You know like become a medical doctor, engineer, lawyer, CEO, etc etc.
 

Last edited by hotrodder89; 06-26-06 at 08:33 PM.
  #15  
Old 06-27-06, 01:05 PM
JHP
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Thank you for your response Hotrodder. In fact I am a lawyer. www.Nopersonalwebsites.com. Despite that fact, I am perfectly capable of figuring out how to operate an air compressor with a little guidance on a few of my questions. It has been my experience that tires do lose some pressure over time and since I keep hearing how important it is to keep tires at the proper pressure, I invested in this gauge and compressor so I can do just that. I have 5 vehicles that need monitoring and I was tired of driving them to various locations for this service. I just wasn't sure about the oil and water thing, so I asked.
 

Last edited by mattison; 06-28-06 at 04:13 AM. Reason: No personal websites in the forums please.
  #16  
Old 06-27-06, 01:32 PM
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Well, it is certainly possible to get both water and oil (on oil filled compressors) in/on anything you use the compressor for. That's why they make filters and dryers for them.

On that small of a compressor, with that little usage, I wouldn't be concerned. I also wouldn't empty the air out of it after each use, that's overkill. Just open the drain every now and then to make sure the water is out. How often is going to depend on how often you use the compressor, and the average humidity in the area you live.

If you drain it after a month and there's no water, then wait two months next time.

I've got a unit that sees a fair amount of use, with both a 20 and 150 gallon tank, and I rarely get more than a few teaspoons of water from it over a months time.
 
  #17  
Old 06-27-06, 02:02 PM
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Pendragon

Did we live in the same fla? With the humidity my little sears 1hp 12 gal would produce about a 1/2 cup during a days worth of use. Not near that bad since I moved to tn.
 
  #18  
Old 06-27-06, 10:53 PM
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Originally Posted by JHP
Thank you for your response Hotrodder. In fact I am a lawyer. www.verobeachlaw.com. Despite that fact, I am perfectly capable of figuring out how to operate an air compressor with a little guidance on a few of my questions. It has been my experience that tires do lose some pressure over time and since I keep hearing how important it is to keep tires at the proper pressure, I invested in this gauge and compressor so I can do just that. I have 5 vehicles that need monitoring and I was tired of driving them to various locations for this service. I just wasn't sure about the oil and water thing, so I asked.

Well here go again, why were you losing pressure on the 5 vehicles in the first place ? tires should never lose pressure unless they're leaking.
hotrodder im not a mechanic, just someone concerned about safety , a car should not be a learning toy sorry.
Also remember all PSI settings are when tire is cold. Always.
 
  #19  
Old 06-28-06, 04:19 AM
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Tire pressures can change with weather/season changes. That is one of the reasons it is good to check the pressures every so often.
 
  #20  
Old 06-28-06, 05:15 AM
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Originally Posted by LouBazooka
Well here go again, why were you losing pressure on the 5 vehicles in the first place ? tires should never lose pressure unless they're leaking.
hotrodder im not a mechanic, just someone concerned about safety , a car should not be a learning toy sorry.
Also remember all PSI settings are when tire is cold. Always.
Here is a quote from safercar.gov:

"Keep in mind that a tire doesnít have to be punctured by a foreign object, such as a nail, to lose air. All tires will naturally lose some air over time. In fact, underinflation is a leading cause of tire failure. So itís advisable to check the pressure in all your tires, including the spare, at least once a month. Thereís nothing wrong with checking more often. Circumstances may call for more frequent checks. For instance, checking pressure after driving on poor road surfaces or before embarking on a long road trip are good safety practices. Finally, always remember to use a tire gauge: you cannot tell if a tire is underinflated simply by looking at, kicking, or pressing on a tire."

I am not sure that you know what you are talking about and will pay no attention to your comments. As for the other comments, I will pay close attention to them.
 

Last edited by JHP; 06-28-06 at 05:44 AM.
  #21  
Old 06-28-06, 05:37 AM
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You did good

You did well you bought a fine air compressor for filling tires and small jobs at a good price and it is sears so parts will be there for many years.
The compressor will just try to keep up on the 125 psi so will go on often if you use it (cycles). No oil will go in the tires dont worry.
If you use air tools you can install an oiler however it is pretty small for that use and you will find it can not keep up with high CFM tools.Also dont try to blow up things like large pool toys it wont do it there is no volume to do that.
I use a shop vac for those tasks.

Have fun with your new compressor IMO everyone should own one take care of it and it will last many many years.
 
  #22  
Old 06-28-06, 05:46 AM
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When you say "there is no volume to do that" what does that mean? Its seems to me that if it puts out enough air to inflate a car tire then a pool tool should be a piece of cake.
 
  #23  
Old 06-28-06, 06:18 AM
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CFM essentially means how long the compressor can keep the desired pressure out when you just have an opening and nothing else on the end of the hose.

When you are powering air tools you need the compressor to keep the pressure above lets say 90psi if it drops below 90psi the air tool won't work that great or at all. Then you have to wait for the tank to fill up again before you can use your air tool.

What you have makes it quick and easy to fill tires, blow things off, and fill pool toys with air.

But I wouldn't bother trying to run impact wrenches off of it, or air drills off of it. I would probably use it for a nail gun.


The bigger the tank the longer it takes to drop the pressure before the desired level. With really expensive air compressor they can almost fill the tank back up as quickly as you can take it out.
 
  #24  
Old 06-28-06, 06:47 AM
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You guys have it all wrong. You need to build the compressor into your engine. Here's how I did it. I also built in a 2.5 gallon tank. I can air up all four of my 33" tires from 15psi (off-road) to 30psi (on-road) in under 5 minutes.

The small amount of oil/water will have no real effect on your tires. You have a nice compressor that is perfect for everyday around-the-house use.
 
  #25  
Old 06-28-06, 06:54 AM
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Ya been there done that use the A/C compressor. We know its for changing tires and things when your out off roading. Redneck engineering will always be with that sport. See how long that A/C compressor will last under continous use.
 
  #26  
Old 06-28-06, 07:00 AM
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I do very little with tools. All I wanted was a device to get my tires up to the proper pressure quickly. I looked at some of the cheaper options and read about problems in the time it took to get the tire up to proper pressure. That's why I got this one. I didn't even know air compressors had tanks on them when I went and looked at them. I saw all these tank sizes I was a little uncertain as to what to do. I now realize that if you need to run tools off the thing you need bigger tanks but that is not my use so I feel like I did not overbuy.
 
  #27  
Old 06-28-06, 07:07 AM
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You are correct you have the best setup for filling tires, and you can fill the tank and carry it out to the car instead of playing with wires to power it, It is portable enough to be convient to carry out to your vehicle in the drive way or on the street. You lucked out on your choice in choosing for your application.

Now that I looked at the picture again I just used that same compressor last weekend to fill some pool rafts at some ones house its pretty light.
 
  #28  
Old 06-28-06, 07:26 AM
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let me explain

Originally Posted by JHP
When you say "there is no volume to do that" what does that mean? Its seems to me that if it puts out enough air to inflate a car tire then a pool tool should be a piece of cake.
You can use it to blow up large pool rafts however it will take a very long time as the tank will deplete very fast and the motor will continue to run to try to keep it full.
A pool raft takes a large amount of air but not much pressure.
A shop vac puts out huge amonts of air but not lots of pressure so you can fill up a large pool float in about a miniute or less. CFM= cubic foot per miniute.
On the other hand you could not use a shop vac to inflate a car tire because there is not enough PSI just lots of low pressure air.
Same things with air tools some require a lot of air some dont.If you use your small tank compressor to operate one of these high CFM tools it will work but not very long maybe 20-30 seconds before the tank pressure drops off because of its size.
The pump just keeps it full but will not keep up with the volume.
 
  #29  
Old 06-28-06, 08:04 AM
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Originally Posted by hotrodder89
Ya been there done that use the A/C compressor. We know its for changing tires and things when your out off roading. Redneck engineering will always be with that sport. See how long that A/C compressor will last under continous use.
Wow, that was pretty condescending. If you have actually done this, you would know that it is a very powerful compressor, and is capable of running impact wrenches and even air grinders, not just 'changing tires'. Call me a redneck if you want to, but I'm the one who can plug and fill your tire on the side of the lonely highway. But I guess you city boys just call road service to put your spare tire on for you.

Oh, and my setup has been going strong for 5.5 years, so I'm not really worried about my $25 junk yard compressor. Besides, A/C compressors are meant for a lot of continuous use. These things are built like tanks.

But you already knew that ...
 
  #30  
Old 06-28-06, 08:09 AM
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Ya actually I have a plug kit in my trunk cause I hate changing tires on the road just plug them while on the vehicle. I also have a portable air compressor that plugs into the cigarette lighter. So if you see me on the side of the road with a flat just keep on driving. Also you don't need air tools to take lug nuts off or fill tires. I have air tools at home and still prefer hand tools. If I wanted to brag about saying I have an impact to use on the road to change tires I would buy a 12v electric one. But since there is 5 lug nuts I will take care of them with a lug wrench don't need to go redneck nascar style changing the tire on the side of the road.

The junk yards want $75 by me for an A/C compressor, it also depends on the design of the compressor. Most you cannot do that. Also you won't be running that for hours straight. So if I am in the middle of a jungle and I have 25 bolts holding the tire to my rim I will give you a call. Or I will use my electric 12v impact.

Don't you have one of those sticker that say you wouldn't understand its a jeep thing.

Because that saying is perfect for me.

Also if I recall with those jeep A/C compressor the oil is seperate from the freon so it sits in the pump and that is why you can use that particular A/C compressor. Every one else can't with out fabricating brackets after find the compressor
 

Last edited by hotrodder89; 06-28-06 at 08:25 AM.
  #31  
Old 06-28-06, 08:33 AM
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Originally Posted by hotrodder89
... I also have a portable air compressor that plugs into the cigarette lighter. So if you see me on the side of the road with a flat just keep on driving.
I'll still stop because I won't know it's you, but you can remind me while we're waiting 30 mintes for you to fill up one tire.
Originally Posted by hotrodder89
...If I wanted to brag about saying I have an impact to use on the road to change tires I would buy a 12v electric one.
12v electric impacts are worthless compared to air, anyone who has used them knows this.
Originally Posted by hotrodder89
.. Also you won't be running that for hours straight.
A/C compressers are built for running hours straight, your 12v electric one is not. I'm outta here, I don't like arguing with 15 year old 'web-experts'. Post your clever comebacks, and then walk away.
Originally Posted by hotrodder89
Also if I recall with those jeep A/C compressor the oil is seperate from the freon ...
Um, no. Re-read my writeup. The compressor is from a Volvo, I didn't touch the A/C on my jeep, which does not work like that.
 
  #32  
Old 06-28-06, 08:45 AM
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damn redneck kids,
Its takes less than 5 minutes to fill the tire with the electric one (quicker than you can make it to me hope you don't get one red light on your way). Either way who cares if it is for a jeep or not you need a special A/C compressor and custom brackets. Air tools aren't the almighty power that you hold them to. And I can repair and fill my tire quicker than it would take for you or a tow guy to get out there not that I would care if I am late to begin with. And if you impacting people didn't over tighten my lug nuts by impacting them on (and risk warping my rotors cuz of that) a cheap 12V impact will do the job. If it doesn't I can stomp down a lug wrench hard enough to crack any lug loose or break the stud.
 
  #33  
Old 06-28-06, 10:02 AM
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I see one drawback on the A/C unit

I only see one draw back on the A/C pump. and that is were do you mount it? and what do you use to turn it? I have recall some of my 4 wheeler buddies saying you can use one and they work good on the trail and they can air up a 36 inch mudder tire pronto.
What kind of psi do those compressors put out?
 
  #34  
Old 06-28-06, 10:17 AM
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They can put out up to 300psi safely but usually you only allow what the tank is capable of most people use propane tanks or compressor tanks you buy in stores that don't have a motor on them. You run it your accessory belts.
 
  #35  
Old 06-28-06, 10:21 AM
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ok

OK that a good pressure ,so some bracket and a space would be have to be made for a installation of this kind not a good thing for a late model street car were there is no room to start with.
 
  #36  
Old 06-28-06, 10:23 AM
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You got it, and people usually do about 120-150psi
 
  #37  
Old 06-28-06, 10:27 AM
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Originally Posted by michael van
I only see one draw back on the A/C pump. and that is were do you mount it? and what do you use to turn it? I have recall some of my 4 wheeler buddies saying you can use one and they work good on the trail and they can air up a 36 inch mudder tire pronto.
What kind of psi do those compressors put out?
Yeah, they are pretty large, unless you are putting it in a truck, you won't have the room. I had a bracket fabricated that relocated the alternator, and mounts the compressor. I used a longer serpentine belt, and the compressor has a clutch pully. The compressor kicks on when the tank goes lower than 95psi, and shuts off at 125psi. My tank has an emergency valve that blows at 150psi.

Search for 'On Board Air' and you'll see many types of trucks and jeeps that do this. Here's my writeup. It really pays off for trail repairs, you can bring your impact wrench, air chisel, air grinder, etc. I know others that have on-board welders, so between the two of us, we can fix nearly anything off-road.

This really is overkill for most people, but for those of us who live in the sticks, we have to be creative sometimes. It's a really powerful compressor, and I did it for about $400.
 
  #38  
Old 06-28-06, 10:37 AM
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looks good

Looks like a good installation in the jeep but then jeeps have lots of room to do stuff like that. I guess you could make one pretty cheap using your plans on a home platform using a electric or gas engine.(lawn mower) Yea this gives me ideas thanks.
 
  #39  
Old 06-28-06, 10:50 AM
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Originally Posted by michael van
... I guess you could make one pretty cheap using your plans on a home platform using a electric or gas engine.(lawn mower) Yea this gives me ideas thanks.
Now you're giving ME ideas! Thanks! Yeah, you could use a standard v-belt instead of serp belt, that would make the clutch free or junk-yard cheap. The motor and small gas tank should be easy to find. The rest is plumbing and a frame for it. Then add one or more air tanks to have more volume. Nice.
 
  #40  
Old 06-28-06, 11:04 AM
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and cheap

Not only real portable from truck to trail or anyplace but cheap and reliable.
You could even weld on a hose reel a small 3hp brigs is all you need.
 
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