96 buick regal front brakes

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  #1  
Old 07-10-06, 11:33 AM
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96 buick regal front brakes

I am going to change the front rotors and pads on my car trying to save a few $ .anything I should know about it before I start ?
Have been told it is very easy to do just take my time
any suggestions on this would be a great help to me
 
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Old 07-10-06, 11:43 AM
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Originally Posted by marknimil
I am going to change the front rotors and pads on my car trying to save a few $ .anything I should know about it before I start ?
Have been told it is very easy to do just take my time
any suggestions on this would be a great help to me
I've got a 96 Regal too, as long as you have the special socket for the caliper mounting bolts you're all set, I think it's a 3/8" drive T-50. I don't recall having any difficulties getting the rotors off when I needed to change them.

Christopher
 
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Old 07-10-06, 11:59 AM
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I just did a 95 regal last night it was a 3/8" allen key on that one.

Have a big clamp or piston pressing tool if you are not familiar with pushing the caliper piston in
 
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Old 07-10-06, 12:26 PM
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Originally Posted by snuckers99
I just did a 95 regal last night it was a 3/8" allen key on that one.

Have a big clamp or piston pressing tool if you are not familiar with pushing the caliper piston in
I just checked my Buick in the garage, it's not a T-50 (too small), but it's definately a Torx bolt. I'm still unpacking my tools and some of that speciality stuff is buried! (I haven't had a proper toolbox since my first one was borrowed without my permission.) There are some GM's out there that use an 8mm hex bolt but I can't recall which ones specifically. Did that 95 have ABS?

Christopher
 
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Old 07-10-06, 12:27 PM
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Yes it had abs, I think they may have thrown on alternate bolts which were torques if the allen key ones run out at the factory
 
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Old 07-10-06, 12:49 PM
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Originally Posted by snuckers99
Yes it had abs, I think they may have thrown on alternate bolts which were torques if the allen key ones run out at the factory
Next time I'm at NAPA I'll have see what their tool catalogue says. It might be something as simple as a production change from one model year to another. Either way, Mark will probably have to get under his Regal and eyeball the caliper bolts before he starts to see which he has.

Christopher
 
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Old 07-10-06, 03:39 PM
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Seems like it was T-55 but not sure. I also have a T-60 laying around in the tool box but I think that was for a seatbelt bolt.

Next, do not push the pistons back into the calipers without opening the bleeders first. I do this on all cars but ABS cars it is especially needed. There is a lot of crud that builds up in a caliper. If you push it into the ABS modulator, there is always the chance of having something stick. It is a very expensive part. Take the opportunity to flush the fluid system while you are there.

You may need heat and/or an impact to break the caliper carrier bolts free. OEM uses loc-tite on them. I would strongly suggest using loc-tite when you re-install.


Do not let the calipers hang by the hoses. Use a coat hanger or some other wire to support them.

Be sure all surfaces where the pads ride (in the carrier) are very clean and the pads move freely in their seats.
 
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Old 07-10-06, 08:26 PM
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And definitely don't forget to remove the slide pins and lubricate them with a high temp synthetic grease specifically designed for disc brake systems. Also, applying a thin layer of that grease to the back of all the pads will help reduce brake noise (squealing).

Oh, finally, don't skimp on the pads. Make sure you use a pad that is equivalent to the O.E.M. pad. In other words, if the original pad was ceramic, make sure you use a ceramic pad as a replacement. The cost difference between a good pad and a crappy pad is nominal in the grand scheme of things. A good pad will last up to three times longer than a crappy pad, plus you get the additional benefits of less brake noise, less brake dust, better braking, and less wear and tear on your rotors.
 
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Old 07-10-06, 08:54 PM
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Ha speaking of don't skimp on brake pads I always ask people how much do those shoes cost your wearing. So ya don't spend less on something that saves your life everytime you use them. Then again if you don't want to stop for deer or that kid that runs out in front of your car or the person that pulls out in front of you. just keep in mind its your insurance, and anything that can aid in reducing possible involuntary manslaughter charges for $20 more is worth it.

I have never had a customer not come back that wanted the cheapest pads and then complained about after braking for a while the car would be harder to stop or barely would stop. I just tell them ya its brake fade and I told you it would happen. Now do you want to redo the brake job with the better pads. Just about all say no. food for thought if you do a lot of city driving. These aren't just junk cars these are also new cars. More easily picked out by the excessive brake dust on the rims.

Odd this is owners of expensive cars usually want the cheapest brake job possible. Makes you wonder if they could afford that luxury car in the first place.
 
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