Help with a caliper change. 1995 Dodge van

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-15-06, 12:32 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3
Help with a caliper change. 1995 Dodge van

Hi everyone.
I'm about to go outside and change the front drivers side caliper on my 1995 Dodge B1500 van.
Are there any certain procedures to take in order to do it properly?
I know I'm going to have to bleed the brakes etc...but how much?
I have no problem removing and replacing the parts. I just want to be sure I don't overlook any specifics.
Thanks in advance.
Steve
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-15-06, 02:54 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Gordonville, MO (SE MO, 100 mi South of St Louis)
Posts: 3
Make sure your copper washer on the brake hose to the new caliper is good and check after the install to make sure it doesn't leak under braking pressure.

You'll need to bleed your entire system, starting with the pass rear, then driver rear, then pass front, then driver front (work your way from the farthest to the nearest to the master cylinder).

It's a very good idea to totally flush out all existing brake fluid annually anyway, gets rids of the moisture that causes rust that causes master cyl/caliper/wheel cyl failure.

Be sure to replace with a good DOT 3 fluid made for disc brakes.
 
  #3  
Old 07-15-06, 02:55 PM
davzack's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 304
Nothing real special about the procedure. I suggest opening the bleeder screw on the caliper and letting it sit for a while until brake fluid comes out (gravity bleeding). This will get most but probably not all of the air out of the caliper. You should also be able to get away with just bleeding that caliper instead of all four wheels.

You need to follow up the gravity bleed with a few rounds of pressure bleeding until there is absolutely no air coming out of the bleeder screw when you open it. You can tell if it still has air in it because it will make a little pfft! sound when you open it.

One other tip...make sure you pull the slide pins out and lube them with a high-temp synthetic disc brake grease as well as put a coating on the back of the pads where they contact the caliper. A little dab on the top and bottom edges of the pads where they sit in the slide rails on the caliper wouldn't hurt either.
 
  #4  
Old 07-16-06, 08:08 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3
Thanks guys.
It was extremely simple to do.
My neighbor is an excellent mechanic and passed by right when I was removing the old caliper.
He said to simply remove the old one. Install the new one with the copper washers on both sides. I gravity bled that caliper, then added fluid.
Then I did a regular bleed on that caliper only 4 times.
He said it's not necessary to bleed all 4 unless the pedal feels spongy after the install and bleed.
I drove it for about 20 miles, and it's good as new now. Pedal is firm and it's working 100%
Thanks for the tips....
Steve
 
  #5  
Old 07-16-06, 08:11 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3
Originally Posted by davzack

One other tip...make sure you pull the slide pins out and lube them with a high-temp synthetic disc brake grease as well as put a coating on the back of the pads where they contact the caliper. A little dab on the top and bottom edges of the pads where they sit in the slide rails on the caliper wouldn't hurt either.

The caliper is not a pin type..just two 1/2 inch bolt/bracket caliper.
I used the silver never sieze grease where the pads contact the caliper...
Thanks,
Steve
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes