93 grand voyager burning wiring

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  #1  
Old 07-17-06, 08:35 PM
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93 grand voyager burning wiring

So I was riding along in my automobile during the recent Chicago heat wave and airconditioning suddenly got a little warmer. I passed through a toll booth shortly thereafter and noticed some smoke coming from the driver side rear section of the hood. pulled over right away and shut off the engine. I popped the hood and saw a little smoke over the wiring harness next to the windshield fluid tank. I decided it must have been the airconditioning some how and tried driving with it off for th rest of the way. I was fine on the highway but after I got off and sat at a stoplight for a couple minutes the engine temp went up to the top. I turned the heat on and it dropped a little. I made it to my destination and popped the hood to find, sure enough, the radiator fan was not spinning. So I started to tear into the wiring and found several wires with no insulation left. And a few broken ones. After taking a good look at it I realized I needed to move it from the drive way and work on it later. But this time it wouldn't start. It would turn over fine but I wasn't hearing the fuel pump. My question is: how hard is it to replace the wiring from the relays on the drivers side back to where ever it goes?

1993 Plymouth Grand Voyager 3.3 L automatic with about 240k miles.
 
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  #2  
Old 07-18-06, 03:47 AM
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you probably dont need to replace all the wiring as most caravans of this age use fusible links wich is a wire that is made to melt into incase of a short much like a fuse would blow this usually protects the main wiring harness from being damaged the only reason it might not of protected it, is if someone replaced it before with to large of a fusible link or maybe just used regular wire instead of using a fusible link.
there is several links at the location you describe usually of several colors you will need to replace any that is bad and then find out what is shorted out that caused it to burn up in the first place and fix the component, cooling fan is very likely possibly a fuel pump.
 
  #3  
Old 07-18-06, 07:21 PM
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Originally Posted by bejay
you probably dont need to replace all the wiring as most caravans of this age use fusible links wich is a wire that is made to melt into incase of a short much like a fuse would blow this usually protects the main wiring harness from being damaged the only reason it might not of protected it, is if someone replaced it before with to large of a fusible link or maybe just used regular wire instead of using a fusible link.
There was a bundle of wires coming from the positive battery terminal that were taped to the "main trunk" which is inside a split loom tubing. This bundle was the source of the tragic heat. But the plastic loom was melted and I can see bare copper within. I can't see any signs that any of this wiring was changed or modified. I did see the word 'fuse' on one of the undamaged wires. If they are fusible links then they did'nt work very well as they melted some of their neighbors. I'm hoping that I can splice some repairs in on the broken wires and simply tape over the loom as it is still tightly packed and probably ok. Other than that it's hard to justify a more costly repair except that I just replaced the dash speakers in this van.

Thanks

ps, any chance of a warranty/recall issue with this?
 
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Old 07-18-06, 07:29 PM
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Ya fusible links don't protect wires they say they do but mathematically there is other factors involved especially with current capacity of short wires, just because the diameter is smaller doesn't mean it will burn up before the rest of the wire will, a short slightly smaller wire can carry more current than a slightly larger wire of much longer length.

You need to get the schematics (chiltons manual) and a mutlimeter and start identifing, tracing wires, and testing wires. I am more concerned with finding out why the wires burned rather than how to fix them.
Wires don't burn up for no reason. Doubt someone replaced the fusible link with a different one. fuses are are used to protect wires not jumper wires/fusible links you can use these fusible link points as test points by removing the link.
 
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Old 07-21-06, 09:50 AM
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Originally Posted by snuckers99
You need to get the schematics (chiltons manual) and a mutlimeter and start identifing, tracing wires, and testing wires. I am more concerned with finding out why the wires burned rather than how to fix them.
Wires don't burn up for no reason.
Well I was about to say that replacing the radiator fan is a whole lot easier than replairing the wiring. But then I tried to remove the fan assy and found the torx screws are quite rusted and one is a little tricky to get to. Ultimately it's still much easier I think to change the fan than to fix the wiring. The fuel pump might be a different issue. But seeing as the fan went out before the fuel pump I think the fan was the culprit. Also, I notice a slight click when I spin the fan by hand. I'll jumper it directly to the battery and see what I get. Then I'll have it towed to the quarry and get rid of this beast

Thanks
 
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Old 07-21-06, 10:19 AM
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Is that your van sitting out there on I-294
 
  #7  
Old 07-21-06, 12:57 PM
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Originally Posted by snuckers99
Is that your van sitting out there on I-294
Which part of 294?
Actually, I'll be heading south (from I90) on 294 a little later today. I'll keep an eye open...
I do like the older chrysler minivans quite a bit because they accomodate my occupation/lifestyle well. I'm not interested in the newer models because they seem to have limited cargo capacity. Can you fit a full sheet of plywood in a new caravan? Sadly, the older ones are getting long in the tooth and I'm running out of patience for fixing them.

Thanks
 
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Old 07-21-06, 01:21 PM
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Before you condemn the fan and replace it. I assure you you will not like the price of the new one. At least test the fan to see if it is still good. There are 2 wires on the fan. Im not sure of the colors, but the black wire is obviously ground. The other is the power wire. Disconnect it and jump it to the battery. If it spins freely and doesnt make any noise, then you just saved yourself a heap of cash. I would try repairing the wires that burned. It is quite possible that you have several circuits in there that are now disabled. Repair the wires with like size wire and check all of you fuses. Then see if it will start. It should unless something on one of those circuits is the reason for the meltdown. There are some relays on the fender well right by the battery on the left side. The coolant fan relay is in there as well as the fuel pump relay and A/C relay.
Let me know if you need anything else, I can look it up and let you know whatever you need to know about these vans.
Hope this helps ya,
Billy
 
  #9  
Old 07-21-06, 02:00 PM
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Originally Posted by billys68ss
Before you condemn the fan and replace it. I assure you you will not like the price of the new one. At least test the fan to see if it is still good. There are 2 wires on the fan. Im not sure of the colors, but the black wire is obviously ground. The other is the power wire. Disconnect it and jump it to the battery. If it spins freely and doesnt make any noise, then you just saved yourself a heap of cash. I would try repairing the wires that burned. It is quite possible that you have several circuits in there that are now disabled. Repair the wires with like size wire and check all of you fuses. Then see if it will start. It should unless something on one of those circuits is the reason for the meltdown. There are some relays on the fender well right by the battery on the left side. The coolant fan relay is in there as well as the fuel pump relay and A/C relay.
Let me know if you need anything else, I can look it up and let you know whatever you need to know about these vans.
Hope this helps ya,
Billy
Actually, this fan has 4 wires. I don't have the manual in front of me but there are 2 relays; one for high and one for low. I am impressed at how expensive these fans are. We replaced this fan awhile back with an autozone motor (which had to be spliced in because it didn't carry the factory connector) only to see it have some kind of mechanical problem almost immediately (don't remember specifics) and we ended up replacing the whole assy with a junk yard part. If all it needed was a fan I think I would just swallow the cost and replace the fan. I think that what I'm looking for here is either some sympathy or a brilliant solution for replacing the wires from someone who has seen this before. I'm an electronics guy and trying to replace these filthy wires has me almost depressed. There's just not much room to work and not much wire to splice to. Do I sound like a big baby?
 
  #10  
Old 07-23-06, 07:56 AM
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Naw.... you dont sound like a big baby. I truly understand your frustration. I do this type of repair regularly. I recently had to redo another mechanics wiring under the dash of a 2000 model Caravan. He had installed an alarm system and used clip on wiring connectors, which I refuse to use. I want my wiring repairs to be clean and well protected. He also didnt even tape or shrink wrap the wires he soldered. I was shocked to see this. Anyway, it was very tight under there and it was basically a free repair since our shop had done the install and the original tech who installed it no longer works there. So yes, I definately feel your pain.
Im sure you know how to fix the wires since you are into electronics, my suggestion is if there is something you can remove to facilitate the repair them remove it. It will be well worth the effort to have a safe, clean repair, even if it takes you all day (or 2). I dont think there is any brilliant solution to wiring repairs.
Good Luck with it.
Billy
 
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