98 S-10 A/C problem

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  #1  
Old 07-19-06, 04:52 PM
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98 S-10 A/C problem

Anyone know where the low pressure side on a 98 S-10 is? There's a valve on the dryer, but I've not seen one located on the dryer before.
 
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Old 07-19-06, 08:17 PM
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We don't give refrigerant advice but your very very hot. Or maybe I should say soon to be very very cold.

The low pressure valve and high cannot be mixed up. the high pressure side is bigger so couplings made for lower pressure side won't fit over high side access ports.

If i recall thats how the sizing goes for the ports. either way they are different sides and you will only be able to stay connected to one.
 
  #3  
Old 07-20-06, 05:46 AM
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Originally Posted by jim d12
Anyone know where the low pressure side on a 98 S-10 is? There's a valve on the dryer, but I've not seen one located on the dryer before.
jim,
Just so you know.....if you're talking about the black or silver can mounted on or near the firewall; in MVAC it's called an "Accumulator" not a dryer. The accumulator does have a desicant in it to remove moisture from the refringerant but its main purpose is to accumulate and then boil off any liquid regrigerant that leaves the evaporator so the liquid cannot get back to the compressor. Liquid refrigerant does not compress and if it were to enter the compressor, it could damage it. When/if that happens it's called "Slugging" the compressor; and it's not a good thing. The accumulator is on the "Low" side of the system so if there is a port on it, it is for sure the low side valve.

Also, just so you know....The low side port is larger than the high side port so they cannot accidentally be interchanged.

Hooking up a can of refrigerant to the high side would create a bomb which could cause serious injury or even death. By making the charging ports different sizes, the automakers help insure we don't kill ourselves!
Phil
 
  #4  
Old 07-20-06, 05:58 AM
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Top off freon 134?

I had a similar question - now that we know where the low side valve is (and that you can't accidentily mix them up), if I buy a can of freon from the local store (I've seen them with a hose and even a valve attached), what is the procedure for adding freon?

A/C on or off?
How much freon to add?
 
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Old 07-20-06, 07:58 AM
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I will back off for now if you will at least let people know about they are supposed to be epa certified and the dangers involved. Thanks.
 
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Old 07-20-06, 09:41 AM
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Read the directions on the back of the topoff kit.

You need to be epa certified to recycle and recover any system.

I have only used my cracker jack box epa license to buy certain freons
 

Last edited by snuckers99; 07-20-06 at 10:03 AM.
  #7  
Old 07-20-06, 09:43 AM
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If you bought the kit to top off your system at the store you should have a gauge with colors on it and pressures. Read the directions on the back of the box. It doesn't get any easier than that.
 
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Old 07-20-06, 09:52 AM
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here is for servicing your vehicle
http://www.epa.gov/ozone/title6/609/recharge.html

http://www.epa.gov/ozone/title6/609/recharge.html#q1

http://www.epa.gov/ozone/title6/609/recharge.html#q3

here is other important links
http://www.epa.gov/ozone/title6/609/index.html

http://www.epa.gov/oar/caa/caa609.txt

http://www.epa.gov/ozone/title6/609/justfax.html

ADMINS should make a sticky thread with these links at the top, stating to read before a/c servicing your vehicle. Instead of having everyone with their interpretation of the rules and going through every time a aircondition thread pops up, we can just say refer to stick thread above
 
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Old 07-20-06, 09:57 AM
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mistaken post button somehow, delete
 
  #10  
Old 07-20-06, 10:07 AM
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This is straight from the EPA: Technician Training and Certification
Technicians who repair or service HFC-134a MVACs must be trained and certified by an EPA-approved organization. If a technician is already trained and certified to handle CFC-12, he does not need to be recertified to handle HFC-134a.

Now lets stay on topic and help this guy out. When the owners let me know something we'll handle it the way we choose to handle it and go from there. End of discussion.




Originally Posted by snuckers99
You just need approved equipement which is what you bought at the store to fill it.

You need to be epa certified to recycle and recover any system.

I have only used my cracker jack box epa license to buy certain freons
 
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Old 07-20-06, 10:13 AM
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Last warning.
 

Last edited by mattison; 07-20-06 at 10:30 AM.
  #12  
Old 07-20-06, 01:30 PM
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Originally Posted by snuckers99
Read the directions on the back of the topoff kit.
I'd stay away from the "Department Store Kits", in the trade, they're called "Death Kits" because most people who use them end up killing their A/C system, and then either go without or pay the big buck to get it fixed right........ First big mistake, the "so called" kits don't allow you to monitor the high side pressure. BIG MISTAKE! ! ! Anybody who hooks up a can of refrigerant to an A/C system without monitoring both High and Low side pressures is asking for trouble, and 9 out of 10 times they get it in the form of big trouble!

When it comes to MVAC, there are no short cuts; and kits are nothing more than a short term Band-Aid that almost always creates a long term problem for the user, or owner of the car.

If you're gonna' work on your A/C, first and foremost GET CERTIFIED, buy some reading material that covers basic MVAC theory/repair techniques, and buy some basic A/C tools which are needed do the job right. Even after investing in the certification, reading material and tools, you'll still be way ahead of the game as far as saving money by doing the work yourself. Plus, this stuff can be used on all your vehicles, not just the one you’re having problems with now.

If you still wanna' mess around with kits and cheapo, pencil style pressure gauges then at least wear some armor to protect yourself so that when a hose bursts, you don't knock out an eyeball or blow up your hands!
Phil
 
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