Wheel woes

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  #1  
Old 08-05-06, 08:31 PM
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Wheel woes

Hi everyone. Here's my issue. About a week ago I heard a noise what I interpreted to be a belt needing tensioning or replacement (which is still quite likely). But just yesterday I determined it to be something else and I just confirmed it driving home just now. Oh, by the way, I drive a 2003.5 Mazda Protege5, 2.0L, automatic...
So anyway, it sounds like the squeal when you need to replace your accessory belts, only it only happens when the car is in motion. I had my girlfriend drive slowly whilst I walked besides the driver side and determined the sound to be coming from the front wheel. I believe it's the clips used to hold the brake pads rubbing against my rotor. Before I take the wheel off and reinstall my brake pads, is there anything else that it could be that I should check for? Thanks in advance!
 
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  #2  
Old 08-06-06, 06:03 AM
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By reinstall, I hope you mean "replace". Good chance the noise is the brake wear warning tabs rubbing the rotors, which is what they are supposed to do.
 
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Old 08-06-06, 08:14 AM
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I absolutely didn't mean replace. I just replaced them this year. It's not the same screech you get when your brake pads are worn. It sounds, to me anyways, like the squeal of an accessory belt that needs adjustment or replacement. Nor does the sound occur when I'm braking. It actually gets queiter as the car rolls to a hault. It gets louder as I drive faster. The rotor is rubbing against a clip or fitting. I had a little trouble installing them. Therein lies my problemo.
 
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Old 08-06-06, 01:36 PM
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TowGuy,

You were right, it was the warning tabs!!! Only, my brakes are less than a year/10K miles old. I even have detailed records that prove it. I don't know what the time/mileage on them is at the moment, I keep that record in my glove box, but I do know they wore unevenly. The inside pad wore quicker than the outside pad. I should check too to see if both wheels are squealing, shouldn't I? I don't get it? Should I make a warranty claim? I used those EBC Green Stuff pads. They also have a HIGH dust yield as I've never seen my wheels dirtier before using these things. I'm completely unsatisfied here. Could I have possibly installed them wrong? I doubt it, everything looked fine except for the caked on dust and one low side worn to the warning tab. Ideas?
 
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Old 08-06-06, 05:34 PM
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Okay, so still thinking about this issue I'm wondering if either just my rotors need to be turned or could it be a problem with the caliper? And, if there is an issue with the caliper... what sort of things go wrong with them? I've seen caliper repair kits for sale, but I've no clue what it would be that would need repairing on it. Someone speak to me!
 
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Old 08-06-06, 06:16 PM
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I am not imtimately familiar with your specific vejicle so some things will be generalities.

I presume your caliper has either one or two pistons but on the same side of the caliper. If so, it is critical the caliper be able to freely move on the slides (some cars use merely two rubbing points, some use bolts and bushings. and others, other things.)

If the caliper doesn't, the outer pad will not be released properly. About the only time I have personally experienced inner wear greater than outer is when the caliper could not move at all so all braking was done by the inner only. If the slides are merely very resistant to movement, they tend to get squeezed against the rotor and maintain that position after the caliper releases causiing excessive outer pad wear.

Pads are often required to be able to slide within their mounts as well. If the pads do not move freely, they will remain against the rotor past need and show premature wear.
Some suggest not machining rotors unless severely grooved or other problems but I recommend machining at each brake job. If not done. the pads will have to "wear in" to the ridges and grooves before there is 100% contact with the rotor. They also become "glazed" which causes noises as well as provide a poor surface for the braking action itself.

Rotors aslo tend to develop ridges at the inner and outer edges that often rub on new pads. This is more than annoying. It reduces the efficiency of the brakes.
If the brakes are worn fairly equally drivers side to passenger side, I would actually look to the rear brakes for your excessively fast wear. While the rear brakes do much less than half of the braking, if they do not provide what they are designed to, they cause the fronts to make up for it and reduce life of the front brakes.

There is always a possibility of a brake hose causing a problem but that usually shows up at one wheel only.


I am not familiar with the brand of pads you are using but for best life and LEAST noise, cheaper is NOT the way to go.
 
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Old 08-07-06, 05:12 AM
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Good info from nap. FWIW I had to do front pads on my sister's Lancer last weekend and we, too, were stumped as to the low mileage. Not able to pinpoint when I did them, but it was less than two years and one inside pad was down to the metal. In her case there are no wear tabs (don't ask, must be a Mitsu engineering thing - probably saves 12c per car coming off the line) so the first indication of wear was the pad backplate scoring the rotor.
Any chance you have any driving habits that would have contributed, i.e. left foot braking, hard braking at stops? [Same q's I asked sis]
 
  #8  
Old 08-07-06, 05:34 AM
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I would guess the same as nap....either the caliper is not able to freely move or the caliper piston could be sticking causing the pad to ride against the rotor. Another possibility could be a bad flexible brake line feeding the caliper. When you raise the front wheels off the ground, do both wheels rotate freely? When you attempt this, after properly securing the vehicle, i.e. using jack stands, see if the wheels turn freely, then apply the brakes several times and check again for free turning. With the amount of brake dust you're seeing though, it's a good possibility the "slides" of the calipers are dirty....brake dust is very "sticky". Hope this helps.
 
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Old 08-07-06, 07:43 AM
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Very interesting. I do drive in New York City so the prerequisite is some aggressive driving, but nothing that is out of reason. The calipers malfunctioning could be something, but how would I resolve this? Should I clean the slides with solvent then apply brake grease? Since it's so full of brake dust, maybe the dirt is indeed hampering proper operation, but the slides have always looked clean to me. The wheels do move freely, I checked when I installed the pads. Hmmmm... What could I do to remedy the caliper issues if there is any?
 
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Old 08-07-06, 08:14 AM
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I agree with all of the above and will add only one thought, on some autos the rear brakes are adjusted when the parking brake is used rather than when the brakes are applied in reverse, if you have one of these type autos and you do not use your parking brake on a regular bases the rear brakes don't get adjusted and slowly become useless, putting more and more workload on the front brakes which is also a reason for quicker wear pattern on front brakes. Have a nice day. Geo
 
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Old 08-07-06, 08:50 AM
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Whenever I redo disc brakes I always clean the caliper slides shiny clean with a wire brush and occasionally have to use emery cloth. I then use a good brake lube and LIGHTLY coat the slide areas....same for the bolts/bushings that hold the calipers in place. You should be able, when the caliper piston is fully retracted, to move the caliper back and forth on the retainers with ease. Once the brake pedal is pressed a few times you should still be able to notice slide movement albeit slight....normally they will "rock" a bit, i.e. feel "loose". What mileage have you accumulated? Caliper pistons, like all other parts, are affected by mileage. Geogrubb is correct in recommending you check your rear brakes because if the front brakes are doing all the work this can cause the pads to generate even more brake dust....similar to what happens during extreme braking.
 
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Old 08-07-06, 01:24 PM
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Oh, this is great stuff. So I should clean the slides shiney clean (which they are, but for good measure I'll do it) and I'll check the rear brakes. But suppose my rear brakes are suffering from underuse? What can I do in this situation?

Also, could the C-clamp I used to reset the caliper damage it?

The car has about 36,500 miles. I installed the brakes at a little less than 29,500. I put them in in October of '05.

So I'll definitely need a new set of front pads. I'll hold off on the new rotors because I really see them as being fit although there is a ridge at the top of them (the two front ones). But the pads don't grip that part at all. In fact, nothing comes into contact with that part. Am I moving in the right direction to recify my situation? Thanks!
 
  #13  
Old 08-08-06, 03:05 AM
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When you compress the caliper piston you should use one of the old pads for the c-clamp to push against...if you did this there shouldn't be a problem. Check your rear brake adjustment; normally just a SLIGHT drag when rotating the wheel. You should get the front rotors turned and they're normally only about $10 each at most places. At 36k miles the brake system infrastructure, i.e. lines, calipers and such should be ok.
 
  #14  
Old 08-08-06, 05:54 AM
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DON'T FORGET THE SLIDE PINS! Pull them out, clean them off and lubricate them with a high-temp synthetic grease.
 
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Old 08-08-06, 07:41 AM
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Okay,

I'll get new pads, I'll clean the slide pins and bolts and bushings on the calipers, and use an old brake pad with the c-clamp t reset the calipers, and probably by Friday (time constraints) I'll check and adjust my rear brakes (although when I installed them I did them correctly with just a "slight drag").

Anything else I should note?
 
  #16  
Old 08-08-06, 08:04 AM
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Maybe one thing....I'm assuming when you installed the new pads you made sure the brake fluid level was not too full? On some vehicles, an overfull master cylinder level can cause the brakes to drag. Other than that, you should be good to go. Good luck
 
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Old 08-08-06, 08:10 AM
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Well, I've never changed, nor added fluid since I bought it. I had resolved to change the fluid once, even buying a big bottle to do it but never got around to it. I figured I'd wait until it needed changing. Thanks!


Sean
 
  #18  
Old 09-01-06, 12:14 PM
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The oddest thing:

I cleaned up my calipers nicely with the wire brush and some brake system cleaner. I added some caliper grease to the slides. I slapped some grease on the back of the new pads (EBC Ultimax brake pads) and 10 days or so later my wheels have a thick coat of brake dust on it. I am upset. The uncle of a friend is a mechanic for a school bus company so I quizzed him and he told me that it's likely there's a pinch or a kink in the brake line. I was fed up at this point and gave in. I took it in to a mechanic who put the car on a lift and took the wheels off. He turned the front wheels by hand to make sure the caliper piston wasn't seized. He said my expensive aftermarket brake pads are the cause of all the pad dust and premature wear. That and my heavy foot (which I still contest!). He said there's nothing else wrong and that next time I've got to buy OEM pads. What do you all think? Clearly my alloy wheels shouldn't be black 10 days after installing fresh brakes, but the mechanic didn't seem surprised. Should I further pursue the matter (maybe even with the dealer) or should I just live with the brake dust and next time use OEM? Thanks!
 
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Old 02-28-09, 04:44 AM
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Update:

Happened again! Had to replace brakes after not very long. This time I went to the dealer and got ripped off for their pads. Fine. I figured they would last. Nope. The passenger side pads alone wore down. Actually, only the inside pad. It was almost down to the metal. Whereas the other pads still had plenty of "meat". All three of them! Just one pad! What a waste. So I did the whole routine again. Pulled everything apart. Wire brushed the hell out of the pistons. Lubed everything up. Tried moving it by hand (it was below freezing out and NOTHING moved freely or with ease, but they did move whereas I needed a LOT of elbow grease to separate them when I first started the work). My next step would be to either get an emory cloth or buy a new caliper. I used brake parts cleaner (aerosol spray) before I took to the scrubbing. I don't know. The driver side was in very good shape and looked like I had another year on them. I'm at a loss why this one caliper stuck. When it gets a little warmer, I'll swap out the rear pads and see how much wear is on them, for good measure, but the fact that only the one pad was toasted tells me it's a caliper movement issue. The slides just have way too much friction. Maybe the Counter Man's brake caliper grease is no good? I get this stuff at the local Pep Boys for $1. I buy two and spread a thin layer over the slides (pistons) and over the back plates of the pads and I always thought I was golden. Should I spring for one of the $16 jars? I only have one car.

Any other recommendations? What should I be doing?
 
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Old 02-28-09, 10:04 AM
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It could be the sliding of the calipers, but it could very well be the caliper pistons have gotten corroded and aren't retracting or at least on the one with the abnormal wear.

Drive your car a few miles, then raise the offending wheel and see if there is brake drag. There is bound to be. Then back out the brake bleeder and see if that releases the drag on the brake. If it doesn't you have a caliper sliding issue, if it does you have something holding the pressure in the caliper.

It could be in the piston not retracting or in the rubber line having collapsed and blocking the return flow back to the master cylinder.
 
  #21  
Old 02-28-09, 10:57 AM
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Okay, lots of jargon. Can you be a bit more explicit with your instructions. Here's how I understand it.

"raise the offending wheel" = jack up the car and take off the wheel.

"see if there is brake drag" = inspect to see if the offending brake pad is pressed against the rotor and has worn down more than the other one. I have a question about this step, if I interpret what you are saying correctly. Can I tell this visually after, say, 100 miles? About how much driving until I can know for sure if there is "drag"?

"back out the brake bleeder" = no idea what you're telling me to do. Release some brake fluid (bleed the brakes a little)? Grab a c-clamp and reset the piston (by the way, in my previous post I mentioned greasing the piston, I meant the slides, I didn't touch the piston, should I?)? Or is this something else?

Other than that, I think your advice makes perfect sense. Added friction from corrosion in the piston might not make it slide closed and back open too easily. Or there is a kink in the brake line forcing it to hold pressure, thereby forcing the piston into the brake position. Seems to be good, sensible info. But I'd really like you to be more specific when you say "back out the brake bleeder". What are you advising me to try exactly?

Thanks marbobj!!!
 
  #22  
Old 02-28-09, 01:58 PM
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Does the wheel turn harder after a few miles of driving, get warner than the other side, Open bleed screw and see if the wheel frees up, If it does than something up stream is blocking brake fluid return ( usually an brake hose) Don't have to bleed it just open and close the bleed screw.
 
  #23  
Old 02-28-09, 02:10 PM
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Well, how would I know if one side is warmer than the other? And no, it doesn't get any harder to turn the wheel. I'm a pretty hard turner and I would, instantly, know if there was more difficulty in cornering.

But I bleed it for half a second and zip her back up, eh? Gotcha! Thanks!!
 
  #24  
Old 02-28-09, 03:41 PM
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Still think your caliper isnt floating on that side the way it should.
If you remove the pads from both sides and compress the piston on the calipers and reinstall the calipers with no pads.
Now with your hand slide the caliper back and forth it should move side to side freely compare both sides to see if they are moving the same.
If they are not you willl need to remove the caliper and find out why, the slides and guide pins is what you use grease or antiseize on, not the piston or back of the pad.
If you dont know what a guide pin is it might help to look at a diagram autozones website has one for your car.
There is only one reason one pad can wear out faster then the other, and thats due to either the pads or caliper are not floating freely.
 

Last edited by bejay; 02-28-09 at 04:11 PM.
  #25  
Old 02-28-09, 03:54 PM
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Wow, bejay, it's impossible to read that one sentence you wrote without any sort of punctuation. I used the grease on the slides and the back of the pads. The other stuff you wrote would need some commas and periods at the least before it would start to make any kind of sense to me.

The gist, I get, is that it still doesn't sound right to you? Thanks for your help!
 
  #26  
Old 03-20-09, 06:49 PM
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See if this makes sense to you

I have worked for years as a professional mechanic (8 yrs at a brake shop) doing thousands of brake jobs. As a quick diagnostic pointer if one wheel wears pads faster than the oposite side there is something causing that wheel to keep the pads applied longer than the other. If it is an outer pad then the caliper slides are the cause, if it is the inner pad then either the caliper or hose is to blame. The inner pad wear requires a little more diagnostic checking to find the cause. The least Common cause would be the brake hose. The brake hose is constructed with an inner hose to keep the fluid contained, wrapped with a layer of something usually fiberglass or steel to make it withstand the pressure of the fluid, then finially an outer layer to protect the fibers from the weather and UV rays of the atmosphere. Anyway the inner layer in older hoses can crack and part of it can flap loose creating a 1 way valve allowing the fluid to go through to the caliper because of the intense pressure but it will either restrict or completely stop the fluid from returning back to the master cylinder which results in that caliper keeping the brakes applied longer on that side and the resulting faster pad wear. This can be Found by pumping the brakes up several times and then quickly opening up the bleeder screw, if brake fluid spurts out like it was under pressure then most likely it was and the hose is no good. if the fluid dosen't squirt just kind of runs out a little then it is usually the caliper itself that is sticking and needs to be replaced. The reason Calipers stick is because of all the crud that collects in them, there are no springs to make the piston retract and they rely solely on the friction of the square cut o-ring around the piston to pull it back into the caliper housing. As time goes by the brake fluid will absorb moisture from the air then as the moisture level in the fluid raised it starts to cause rust on the insides of the steel brake parts such as the master cylinder and caliper housings themselves. Then being the low spot in the brake system all the rust flakes settle in the calipers and gunk up the caliper bores requiring more pull than is supplied by the o-ring to be pulled back the piston. Calipers aren't very expensive $20 or so maybe even less depending on make and model of car from most checker/kragen/napa parts stores. "Loaded" calipers are also available and usually $45-$50 each and they come with new hardware (all the small clips, slides,pins etc..) and a new set of pads. Calipers should always be replaced in pairs to maintian even braking so the car will stop straight when you use the brakes. Hope this helps.
 
  #27  
Old 03-20-09, 07:40 PM
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Wow, thanks! This does help. I think the caliper is really expensive though. But... it may be worth it. It's the inside pad. I know not of this square O-ring you speak of. I hope it isn't hose related. I think replacing the brake line will be a whole lot more invasive and intensive... though something tells me it is. I couldn't possibly bleed the system out before I work on the line so how does one change that? Anyway, I will pump the brakes and bleed it a bit and see what kind of release it has.

Thanks!
 
  #28  
Old 03-20-09, 08:07 PM
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Caliper Prices

Mazda Parts are a little higher than a chevy but I just checked quick online at checker auto and a front caliper for your car including all the new clips and slide pins is $63.99 each you should replace both calipers at the same time so your car stays stopping straight. anyway here is the link to the parts online you should proabably get a better price in a parts store in your area While we find your parts, please enter your ZIP Code at CSK Auto

Good Luck

BTW $74.99 includes all the parts including new semi metalic pads
 
  #29  
Old 03-20-09, 08:14 PM
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Seeing as I just slipped in a set of $100 pads, I find it hard to believe that I would want their semi metallic ones those come with. Will my usual pads fit in these... there are so many different brands?? I think I'm going to run to my dealer and see what I get offered. I think if I get the same exact caliper I may get away with only replacing one side (as the only difference would be the amount of use on the other side). First, I should make sure it isn't the brake line.

Thanks again, mate!
 
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Old 03-21-09, 04:48 AM
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Baxking up a few post I should have said to jack up front of car and turn the wheels on the ground by hand. You will be able to feel if one of the wheels is warner than the other. I should of explained better, old age creeping in I guess.
 
  #31  
Old 03-21-09, 01:20 PM
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Hick, help me out here!

So I popped off the wheel and twisted off the wrong bolt. This was in the middle of the outside of the caliper (where the brake line ends). Brake fluid drizzled out onto everything. Bof! So I tightened her up and wiped down everything (how corrosive is this stuff? I know it absorbs air... but the boots it dripped onto, should I have done more than just wipe it off?). Then I tried the little screw that was adjacent with the tiny boot and I think that is the bleeder. Again, after pumping the brakes, it only drizzled out. A mild trickle. The stuff is very clean though. It's reassuring that I won't have to bleed and flush and change the brake fluid for now. So does that mean I replace my caliper?

Here's the crux of my query. When I change the caliper, how do I manage with the fluid? How do I keep the system from bleeding out while I swap out the caliper? It seems pretty straight forward outside of that... is that a fair assumption?

Thanks!
 
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Old 03-21-09, 01:42 PM
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Brake fluid is not good to get on paint otherwise not to bad. Run some water over the spill, fluid will dilute. Do not let it splash on paint.
Take bolt out of hose and either let it drip or get a old valve stem from any auto shop where they do tires and stick ot in the hole of the hose. Clean stem first. Will have to bleed system.
 
  #33  
Old 03-21-09, 01:51 PM
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Oh great... now I have to bleed the whole system. That means popping off all four tires and running around with a jack and a friend. Bof! Oh well, at least I'll learn how to bleed my brakes. About how much brake fluid will I need to do this? In other words, about how much does my car hold?

I can't just let it drip, like you mentioned, right? The master cylinder will run out and that's bad from what I hear.
 
  #34  
Old 03-21-09, 08:32 PM
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brake Fluid Drip

Sean when you are letting the brake fluid dip out of the bleeders it dosen't run out all that fast. As long as you keep an eye on it you can just keep refilling your master cylinder as the brake drip bleed themselves. One Quart of brake fluid should be more than enough. Hopefully this dosen't over load you but since your car is aproaching 6 yrs old and obviously it has enough contamination to start gunking up parts and causing problems, you should really completly change your brake fluid. Let me ask you, after driving in hard traffic does your brake peddle feel softer? If this happens it is proabably because your brake fluid is starting to boil. The older the fluid the more humidity it has absorbed and therfore the lower the boiling point of the fluid. When you first apply the brakes the very outside surface that contacts the rotor can reach 1,000 deg F in just seconds, the longer you have them applied or the more often you use them the farther the heat will penetrate into the pads and other parts. Eventually your brakes will fail and you will crash. Most car manufacturers suggest flushing your brake fluid once a year just like changing your engine oil every 3,000 miles. An often overlooked maintance procedure but had you done it you proabably wouldn't have had all the brake problems that have been plaging you.

An Easy Way to flush your brake fluid is to use a turkey baster and suck as much of the brake fluid out of the master Cyl as you can. Then refill it to the MAX level. Since you sound like you will have a friend helping you have them sit in the drivers seat and after you open the brake bleeder they should SLOWLY push the brake pedal down. Be VERY carefull not to push the pedal all the way to the floor, About half way down should be more than enough, then before they release the pedal tighten the bleeder screw to prevent air from being sucked back into the system. Check your Master Cylinder and refill the fliud if needed then repeat the process untill you get nice clear clean fluid coming out. Repeat this at each wheel and wala your brake system has been flushed of all that nasty contaminated Fluid.

You can end up with a large puddle of fluid on the ground/Garage Floor While doing this the good news is, Brake Fluid is very water Soluable just plain water will clean it up very easy. To Avoid the mess you can make a container to catch the old fluid pretty easy by using an empty soda Bottle (plastic) and a peice of clear vinyl tubing like is used for air lines in fish aquariums, Just get the size that fits snugly on the brake bleeder fitting/screw and then drill a hole in the lid of the soda bottle and stick the other end into the bottle, Wala again flushed brakes and no mess.

If the end of the tubing that is in the bottle goes to the bottom so it is covered by brake fluid you can also use this tool to Bleed your brakes by yourself. Just attach the hose to the bleeder screw and set the partially filled bottle of fluid on the ground open the bleeder screw and then step on the brake pedal about 3 times, again not all the way to the floor, Just half way and instead of sucking air back into the system it will suck a small amount of fluid back up the tube instead of air. :-).

Fair warning the reason I keep saying not to push the pedal all the way to the floor is because doing so will result in the rubber cups that form the seal in the master cylinder bore being pushed over the area that they normally do not make contact with, Usually this will cut the rubber and ruin your master cylinder so do this with extreme caution. Putting your left foot under the brake pedal while your pushing it down with your right foot will normally keep you from pushing it down too far.

Hope this helps
And if you do ever get brake fluid on paint immediatly flush it with water brake fuid eats paint like a fat kid on a doughnut so be very carefull around paint with brake fluid.
 
  #35  
Old 03-21-09, 08:59 PM
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Hick, will do on the complete system flush... no reason not too. I'm being lazy is all. I'll buy some more brake fluid (I have an unopened 32oz bottle) and get started on this project next week if I get the caliper in time. I also hear a couple of telephone books under the brake pedal work very well too!!

Thanks again... you are the CHAMP!
 
  #36  
Old 03-29-09, 05:34 PM
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Okay, a couple things:

I just finished the repair today. I started it yesterday and swapped out the calipers no sweat. I took special care not to depress the brake pedal to the metal. When I was done bleeding, the brakes were far too spongy. I called around and figured that I did have to press the brakes all the way, open the bleeder screws, then close 'em up and pump the brake and do it again to remove the air out of the new calipers. Did that today and was able to drive it.

I have slotted and dimpled rotors and normally when I drive I hear a sound similar to when a bike has a piece of paper flapping in its spokes as it drives. Well, the sound is now gone and I hear something like as if I'm rolling over a bump every rotation and only on the passenger's side. It's funny because the first sound is completely gone and the second sound is only to one side. I'm puzzled.

Also, while bleeding the brakes I was getting a heck of a lot of sediment out of the bleeders of all 4 wheels. Even on the new calipers, all this sediment kept spilling out. My brakes were always very good except that I had one pad that kept wearing down very prematurely. Now it seems like I've introduced a lot of brake system torment into my life.

Anyway, if any of you have any opinions or can tell me what I can look for, I'd love it. The car runs fine, the brakes had no noticeable change (for better or worse). They still stop the car. I also changed the coolant, the transmission fluid and filter, and the rear brake pads. One thing with the coolant: The reservoir would not empty after opening the radiator plug. Nothing drained out of it. Puzzling. Any thoughts there? We took it off, and poured out the old stuff in there and replaced it that way, but it didn't drain out into the radiator. Thoughts there?

Thanks all, in advance!!!
 
  #37  
Old 03-29-09, 06:56 PM
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Location: Iowa!!!!!
Posts: 3,672
In terms of your radiator draining: You pulled the plug on the radiator and nothing came out of the radiator? If that's the case and you had the cap off the radiator, the drain plug is plugged with residue or dirt. You would need to flush the whole thing to get it cleaned up. Also change the thermostat, it's probably gunked up too.

In terms of your brakes: if you had a lot of gunk come out of the bleeders the system needed flushed. If the brakes are still spongy, you'll have to keep bleeding until they firm up. Normally, the brake sequence is the brake farthest away from the master cylinder first. Then work your way towards it.
 
  #38  
Old 03-29-09, 08:15 PM
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Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 279
Hey, mar, thanks for the input but nope, I pulled the plug on the radiator and boy did it ever empty. The reservoir is what didn't.

And I did bleed the brakes in the correct order yesterday. Then when the brakes were too spongy, I got under it again today and only did the two front since that's where all the air was.

Anything else?
 
  #39  
Old 04-12-09, 01:56 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 13
Hi Again

The reason You didn't get the resevoir to empty with the radiator is because it takes the vacuum that is formed when the coolant cools down and contracts to pull the fluid from the resevoir into the radiator. You did just what you needed to do in order to empty it so it could be changed, not a problem with anything just the normal way it works.

The reason I said not to pump the pedal when bleeding the brakes is exactly what you had happen, when the pedal is pumped it makes alot of tiny air bubbles form in the fluid from the air that is already in the system. after it was able to sit and the bubbles come out of the fluid you were able to get the rest of the air out the second day.

All the sediment that you flushed from your system after changing the calipers is what causes the calipers to stick and fail in the first place. Bet your glad you bled them all now :-)
its a good idea to flush your brake fluid once a year especially in more humid areas
 
  #40  
Old 04-12-09, 02:11 PM
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Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 279
So you think I fixed the problem? How do you reckon all that sediment got in there in the first place? And it wasn't that I pumped the brakes, I thought I wasn't to let the brake pedal go all the way to the floor. In fact, what I had to do was the opposite. Also, I don't believe I got all the sediment out. Even when the fluid ran almost clear, there was still a little sediment being bled. I figured it didn't hurt before, it might not hurt now, but maybe I stirred it all around and maybe all my calipers may stick now? And I don't even really know if it were the calipers that were sticking.

Lastly, these new calipers are awful. They're already a rusty yellow. The stock genuine Mazda ones never had any rust, not even after it rained. Just goes to show you the workmanship and pride the original equipment is made with. I guess they get away with charging what they do for a reason.

Hey, thanks for following up with me though. I appreciate it.
 
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