front end

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  #1  
Old 11-30-06, 10:16 AM
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front end

I have had my brakes completely redone on my 2002 Dodge Dakota, STX 4 wheel drive. I have had both rotors, both sets of pads and calibers replaced. at 55,000 miles. Now agaiin when you apply the brakes the front end jumps like the rotors are warped again. I have replced them twice since the 55,000 miles. As soon as I replece them its a smooth ride for about the first 7500 miles. Then replace again. Now could some one advise me what is causing the issue? Thanks,
 
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Old 11-30-06, 11:33 AM
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Are you properly bedding in the new pads? If you don't, then your rotors and pads will glaze over.
 
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Old 11-30-06, 11:37 AM
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Bedding

What terms are you referring to as bedding?
 
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Old 11-30-06, 11:38 AM
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Also, make sure your lug nuts are not loose or broken.
 
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Old 11-30-06, 11:40 AM
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Originally Posted by nascarbiff16 View Post
What terms are you referring to as bedding?
Bedding allows your brakes to reach their full potential. Until they are bedded, your brakes simply do not work as well as they can. If you've installed a big brake kit, changed your pads and rotors, or even if you've purchased a brand new car, you should set aside some time to bed the brakes in by following the instructions below. Proper bedding will improve pedal feel, reduce or eliminate brake squeal, and extend the life of your pads and rotors. For more on the theory of bedding, please refer to this excellent article by StopTech: Removing the Mystery from Brake Pad Bed-In.

Caution: After installing new pads/rotors or a big brake kit, the first few applications of the brake pedal will result in almost no braking power. Gently apply the brakes a few times at low speed in order to build up some grip before blasting down the road at high speed. Otherwise, you may be in for a nasty surprise the first time you hit the brakes at 60 mph.

When following these instructions, avoid doing it around other vehicles. Bedding is often best done early in the morning, when traffic is light, since other drivers will have no idea what you are up to and will respond in a variety of ways ranging from fear to curiosity to aggression. An officer of the law will probably not understand when you try to explain why you were driving erratically! Zeckhausen Racing does not endorse speeding on public roads and takes no responsibility for any injuries or tickets you may receive while following these instructions.

From a speed of about 60mph, gently apply the brakes a couple of times to bring them up to operating temperature. This prevents you from thermally shocking the rotors and pads in the next steps.

Make a series of eight near-stops from 60 to about 10 mph. Do it HARD by pressing on the brakes firmly, just shy of locking the wheels or engaging ABS. At the end of each slowdown, immediately accelerate back to 60mph. DO NOT COME TO A COMPLETE STOP! If you stop completely and sit for any length of time with your foot on the brake pedal, you will imprint pad material onto the hot rotors, which can lead to vibration, uneven braking, and could even ruin the rotors. With some less aggressive street pads, you may need fewer than eight near-stops. If your pedal gets soft or you feel the brakes going away, then you've done enough. Proceed to the next step.

The brakes may begin to fade slightly after the 7th or 8th near-stop. This fade will stabilize, but not completely go away until the brakes have fully cooled. A strong smell from the brakes, and even smoke, is normal.

After the 8th near-stop, accelerate back up to speed and cruise for a while, using the brakes as little as possible. The brakes need 5 to 10 minutes to cool down. Try not to become trapped in traffic or come to a complete stop while the brakes are still hot.

If club race pads, such as Hawk Blue, are being used, add four near-stops from 80 to 10mph. If full race pads, such as Performance Friction 01 or Hawk HT 14, are being used, add four near-stops from 100 to 10 mph.

After the break-in cycle, there should be a slight blue tint and a light gray film on the rotor face. The blue tint tells you the rotor has reached break-in temperature and the gray film is pad material starting to transfer onto the rotor face. This is what you are looking for. The best braking occurs when there is an even layer of of pad material deposited across the face of the rotors. This minimizes squealing, increases braking torque, and maximizes pad and rotor life.

After the first break in cycle shown above, the brakes may still not be fully broken in. A second bed-in cycle, AFTER the brakes have cooled down fully from the first cycle, may be necessary before the brakes really start to perform well. This is especially true if you have installed new pads on old rotors. If you've just installed a big brake kit, the pedal travel may not feel as firm as you expected. After the second cycle, the pedal will become noticeably firmer. If necessary, bleed the brakes to improve pedal firmness.
 
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Old 11-30-06, 11:40 AM
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Lugs

The lugs are not loose or broken, also it seems to happen after about 5,000 miles. or about 4 or 5 months that when you can start to notice the terrible vibration. The last set of rotors I replaced was in Jun of 06. They started the vibration around the first part of Oct 06. These rotors cost about 118.00 bucks a piece.
 
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Old 11-30-06, 11:44 AM
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oops, disregard that bed in procedure, since that procedure is for track use.

Step 1: Make 10 stops from 30 mph (50 kph) down to about 10 mph (15 kph) using moderate braking pressure and allowing approximately 30 seconds between stops for cooling. Do not drag your pads during these stops. After the 10th stop, allow 15 minutes for your braking system to cool down.

Step 2: Make 5 consecutive stops from 50 mph (80 kph) down to 10 mph (15 kph). After the 5th stop, allow your braking system to cool for approximately 30 minutes. This completes the break-in of your pads to the rotor surface.

During Steps 1 & 2, a de-gassing process occurs which may produce an odor coming from your pads as they complete the break-in cycle. This odor is normal and is part of the process your pads must go through to achieve their ultimate level of performance. The odor will go away after allowing your braking system to cool for approximately 30 minutes.

As with any new set of pads, do not tow a trailer or do any hauling during the break-in period.

Full seating of your new brake pads normally occurs within 1,000 miles.
 
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Old 11-30-06, 12:41 PM
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Do you have oversized tires?

What has been done to the rear brakes?

Both of those items can have extreme effects on the front brakes.
 
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Old 11-30-06, 01:39 PM
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OK...Several things to look at...........#1-Do you tow???? and if so, is the trailer large and does it have it's own brakes???? #2- Are the rear brakes adjusted properly?????.........Frts do about 70% of the stopping, but if you're not getting that othre 30% the frnts will overheat #3- How many miles on the vehicle???? Does it have ceramic pistons in the calipers????.......Sometimes those "plastic" pistons are not happy to be set back in the caliper bore and just don't work right after the first set of brakes.
#4-Last, but not least...........Is your tech torquing the lug nuts or playing "lethal weapon" with an impact wrench??????
 
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Old 12-06-06, 06:12 AM
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brakes

I have done everything that you all have asked. Lugs torgued to approx 110 lbs, rear brakes are properly adjusted, do pull a trailer a few times a year. I am starting to believe that the calipers are the issue, maybe hanging up at times. But the weired thing it doesn't do it everytime you hit the brakes, and I don't have oversized tires either.
 
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Old 12-06-06, 07:31 AM
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be sure whatever method is used that allows the calipers to slide are clean and lubed properly. This is one of the most overlooked items I have seen in brake repair.

next, have the brake hoses ever been replaced. That is the next thing I would look at. I have had some very strange experiences with brake hoses. They often have collapsed internally but the collapse is not consistant so it tends to defy direct diagnosis and are replaced because of symptoms.

One thing I try is to:


take off the front wheels and if you have a floating rotor, re-install the lugnuts firmly but not overly tight. check to see if the there seems to be any drag.

Now, open the brake bleeder and allow any pressure within to release. try to spin again. If it has becomes freer, you have a brake hose with a restriction. replace it.

I drive a full size Dodge van for work. recently had brake hoses replaced. Mechanic stated it seems to be a prevelent problem with Dodge vans. Don't know if that extends to Durango's too but who knows. Also have owned several Dodge vehicles. It does seem that brake hoses were a problem with them as well.
 
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