Is Fix-A-Flat worth it?

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  #1  
Old 12-19-06, 08:44 AM
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Is Fix-A-Flat worth it?

I have a tire with good tread on it but it has a slow leak. I have to add air every couple weeks. My son swears by that Fix-A-Flat stuff. Should I just buy a can of this stuff or will it cause problems? Thanks for the help.
 
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Old 12-19-06, 08:52 AM
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Fix a flat is a functional decent product for a temporary solution.I would not consider it permanent.

Depending on where your leak is,it may help you to use the tire until you can have it properly repaired.Fix a flat doesn't often work on damaged stems.

If you try it and it does not work out it will not cause any additional problems because if it doesn't work you probably need a new tire or professional repair.
 
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Old 12-19-06, 08:58 AM
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Check out the tire...

Have you had anyone checkout the tire to find the cause of the slow leak? I've never used fix-a-flat but I think you would be better off bringing it to a tire shop and have them identify the source of the leak and fix the problem if possible. It could be a bad valve stem, or the the rim needs to be cleaned and the tire reset, or you could have a nail hole or something. I think fix-a-flat is more designed as a tool to get you off the highway and to a safe place rather than as a permanent repair.
 
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Old 12-19-06, 09:19 AM
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Ive had it work on what you describe , fixed the problem

I always carry a can in each vehicle

wont hurt ,

if you use it remeber to tell the guy who changes the tire when you get it replaced becouse there will be liguid rolling around in there
 
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Old 12-19-06, 10:24 AM
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Why not just find the leak and fix it?
 
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Old 12-19-06, 10:39 AM
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Not only will there be Fix-A-Flat product still in the tire when it's repaired but the stuff is extremely flammable....pity on the smoker that's breaking down the tire. Besides, most people put a can in their trunk for emergency use, sits there for several years, and when it comes time to use it there is no active propellant left in the can. Mitch17 has the best idea of all! There is also an accident transcript by the NTSB that relates to the death of two people in an accident; An automobile was struck from behind and caught fire. While bystanders were attempting to extricate the victims, an explosion took place forcing the rescuers to back away from the vehicle. Originally thought to be the gas tank that caused the explosion, the gas tank was found to be 3/4 full and intact....cause of the explosion? Two cans of Fix-A-Flat....one can was crushed in the accident and was apparently leaking and once the flame reached the contents (confined in what was left of the trunk) an explosion occured and the ensuing fire proved fatal to the accident victims.
 
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Old 12-19-06, 11:29 AM
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Originally Posted by mitch17 View Post
Why not just find the leak and fix it?

thats what fix a flat does , it finds the leak fills it and its fixed ,

why spend the time at the tire shop and spend 20-25 dollars when a 4 dollar can of fix a flat can fix it in a couple of min

I think the flammability is a urban myth , while one may have caused a car to explode the same could be said for other things commonly carried

sound like a good mythbusters episode
 
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Old 12-19-06, 11:41 AM
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I agree it is better to find the leak and fix it with conventional means but I have used it on slow leaks and it did fix the problem. Never had any problems having the tire broke down and replaced.
 
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Old 12-19-06, 11:43 AM
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Unless you're a lady driver, I see no need for fix-a-flat. If you get a flat, put the spare on and get the flat repaired properly. Given the choice, I'd rather have a robust repair (patched from the inside), than a bandaid repair with fix-a-flat.

I have no use for mechanic-in-a-can products.

Mfrancle, try finding the leak yourself. A slow leak that needs top off every couple weeks may still be findable. Throw some soapy water on the tire with a rag, If you can't find the leak, overpressure the tire to 45 psi or so. Check the tire tread, rim/bead, and valve stem. Knowing where it's leaking from may help in your decision.
 
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Old 12-19-06, 11:49 AM
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I guess it depends on what your time is worth , I can always find something better to do with my time and my money

YMMV
 
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Old 12-19-06, 11:49 AM
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have used FixAFlat, the grenen slime and plug kits with no comlaints.

I once repaired a tire with FixAFlat and drove on it for more than a year.

I prefer to plug the tire it's cheaper and quicker

years ago I had a 4x4 with over 5 plugs in a tire and it never failed me
 
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Old 12-19-06, 12:16 PM
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Originally Posted by ocoee View Post
I had a 4x4 with over 5 plugs in a tire and it never failed me
25 yrs ago I replaced the tires on my work truck. The tire guy counted 20+ plugs in 1 of the tires - figured I got an extra 1000 miles with the added rubber
 
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Old 12-19-06, 03:28 PM
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I bought a plug kit for $10 and have fixed half a dozen flats with it. How's that compare to a $4 can?
 
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Old 12-19-06, 03:57 PM
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Originally Posted by mitch17 View Post
I bought a plug kit for $10 and have fixed half a dozen flats with it. How's that compare to a $4 can?
how long to find , and patch each ?

have you fixed one in a parking lot 100 miles form home ?

in the rain ?

on the shoulder of the interstate ?


could your wife patch one if she came out of work to a flat ?

(ive used fix a flat in all of the above )
 
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Old 12-19-06, 04:17 PM
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Talking check tire yourself

Pull tire off overinflate 10 or so pounds get a bottle of dish soap a bucket and water make a mix and slather on the stuff look for air bubbles.
Do not forget the valve lots of leaks happen there. check back and front.
Or if you do not mind and your wife does not care (mine does) do it in the bathtub.
I have used fix a flat it works ok but not all the time and it can throw your wheel off balance Temp repair in my book.
 
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Old 12-19-06, 05:08 PM
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If selecting a foam tire sealant for a quick fix for minor repairs to flat tires, choose one that is labeled non-flammable. Many tire shops refuse to repairs tires where foam sealant has been used.
 
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Old 12-19-06, 08:21 PM
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Originally Posted by mitch17 View Post
I bought a plug kit for $10 and have fixed half a dozen flats with it. How's that compare to a $4 can?
I've plugged my own tires for years but every now and again I get a leak I just can't find and the fix a flat seems to do the job. I only buy the cans at the dollar store - lot cheaper

Over inflating often helps to find the leak but some can be almost impossible to find. I once had a front tractor tire tube in a tank for 15 min before we could find the leak.
 
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Old 12-19-06, 08:40 PM
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It works...... good in a pinch but I wouldn't leave it in there..... if you have steel rims.
 
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Old 12-23-06, 11:01 AM
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I used it in a tire on my wife's van. Month's later I took the van in to a local tire shop because of a problem with the same tire. They told me that they couldn't fix it because of the foam stuff. So I had to buy a new tire.

I also used it in a wheelbarrow tire. It kept the tire inflated for awhile; but, it eventually leaked again, and I replaced the tire.

I used to keep a can in each of our vehicles; but, considering the above experience, and the fact that we never had to use it for an emergency, on-the-road flat, I don't anymore.
 
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Old 12-23-06, 11:23 AM
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I think we are talking about different products , the stuff I use is not a foam , but a milky , rubbery substance that remains liquid in the tire as you drive it coats the inside of the tire and the leaking air pressure forces it into the hole , sealing it
 
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Old 12-23-06, 11:50 AM
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Fix a flat good for temporary repair. There is also a product out there (slime) the stuff is worthless. Now if you have a nail or other metal object in your tire get it patched from the inside at a tire repair shop, it is more of a permanent repair.
 
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Old 12-26-06, 08:55 AM
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I used the Fix A Flat in my lawn tractor tire and eventually needed to replace the tires due to age cracking (and an bulging sidewall). When I demounted the tires, I found that the one with Fix A Flat had severly rusted the wheel rim. I had to sand and repaint it before mounting the new tires in order for the wheel rim to seal. I don't think that I would consider using that product again absent some extreme emergency.
 
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Old 12-27-06, 12:29 AM
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fix a flat

I would never use it on either one of the family trucks, since they are newer models with almost new tires on 'em, ( I've never had a flat tire so far )but I have used it on a couple of bobcat tires with small leaks and the stuff really works, not a complete seal but it slows down the leaking pretty good.
 
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