rubbing compound

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-22-07, 03:16 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: MD
Posts: 2,084
rubbing compound

I went to the body shop where the tech emoved pine sap, what looked like scratches etc with a soft cloth and a can of , I think he said -rubbing compoud. i want to get some from a car parts store but don't want to damage the finish. This compound he used even removed the tarry stuff you get on the higway - like goo and tough to remove.
Is rubbing compound the name of this product? Thank you
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-22-07, 03:22 PM
HotxxxxxxxOKC's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 8,044
Not sure of the name either, but, they do specifically sell tree sap and tar remover compound at all auto stores.
 
  #3  
Old 05-23-07, 04:26 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: MD
Posts: 2,084
compound

Thank you for the tip- maybe someone else will know the name.
 
  #4  
Old 05-23-07, 05:05 AM
the_tow_guy's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: SW Fla USA
Posts: 11,513
I think tar remover is what I've seen on the cans or Bug & Tar Remover. Also turpentine will probably work and products like Goof-Off or Goo-Gone, etc. After you get the tar/bugs off, be sure to wash down the area you used the remover on and rewax. For the scratches you can use either rubbing compound or polishing compound. The difference is in the abrasive in the product. Polishing compound is a finer abrasive and the rubbing compound is more coarse, although they are fairly hard to distinguish by sight & feel. Be careful, it is an abrasive and has to be used sparingly and according to directions.
 
  #5  
Old 05-23-07, 09:00 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Staten Island, New York
Posts: 182
Clear Coat Paint

If your car is a late model with clear coat paint then you should buy Clear Coat rubbing compound. Regular rubbing compound will dull your finish. A good product to remove road tar is WD-40 (they recommend this as one of the many uses on the side of the can).
As stated by others, make sure to wax after using any of the above.
 
  #6  
Old 05-24-07, 03:58 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Wilmington
Posts: 4,219
Rubbing compound is an abrasive, and removes paint, it is good for removing scratches, but should not be used often as you will rub away the clear coat. For bugs, tree sap, and tar some of the above suggestions are better.
 
  #7  
Old 05-24-07, 07:32 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: MD
Posts: 2,084
compound

Thanx to all you good guys for the help - I've made a note of all and know which way to go.
 
  #8  
Old 05-28-07, 09:05 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 17
rubbing compound is like a liquid sandpaper. It can remove 1500 grit scratches, depending on the type you get. The one I have is clear coat safe, and won't damage the car finish, unless you really got it hot with a buffer or something, but doing it by hand doesn't hurt the paint. It's great for removing surface scratches, or oxidation on the paint. WD-40 as someone suggested does work pretty well, but let it soak in for a bit. I havn't tried bug and tar remover, but I will because stuck on bugs are impossible to remove, even with a power washer.
 
  #9  
Old 05-29-07, 04:41 AM
the_tow_guy's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: SW Fla USA
Posts: 11,513
Oh, I don't know. Florida is the bug capital of the world in May & September ("love" bugs) and I pressure wash the front of my truck every evening. Of course, I don't worry too much about potential paint damage, but it takes them right off.
 
Reply


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:47 AM.