Amp hour rating for this battery?

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  #1  
Old 10-14-07, 03:39 PM
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Amp hour rating for this battery?

Hi all-

I have an Everstart car battery for which I need to know the amp hour rating. Unfortunately a spec sheet has darn near impossible to find, at least online. And of course car batteries don't tend to list amp hours on the battery itself. Does anyone have a site I could try, or perhaps just a ballpark estimate based on the dimensions?

Here's all I know about this one:
Everstart Part Number: 26-5
Cranking amps: 650
Cold cranking amps: 525
Dimensions: 7.75" (w) x 6.5" (d) x 7.0" (h)


What I may have to do as a last resort is charge up the battery fully then run a known load and time how long it takes to drop to 12.0 volts, at which point I can assume about 25% capacity is left. That will give me the approximate _current_ aH capacity but I was kinda hoping to compare that to the original specs.

Thanks!
-core
 
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  #2  
Old 10-14-07, 08:23 PM
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If you're from Des Moines, you have an O'Reilys close by. They sell that battery and should be able to give you the information or give you an Everstart customer service number to call.

Just curious, why were you needing the amp hours rating?

Bob
 
  #3  
Old 10-15-07, 09:15 AM
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Thanks Bob, that sounds like a plan.

As for why I'm needing that info -- I left that out because it's definitely not automotive-related. I have a medium sized battery bank at home for backup purposes. Mainly deep-cycle marine batteries, but I _never_ turn down a free old battery even if it reads dead 0.0v. Usually I can rescue it from the grave.

When I go camping I usually take a battery or two and an invertor. The deep cycle marine batteries are great Ah-wise but they are huge, and I usually don't even come close to using any significant capacity. One or two of these small 26-5's would be ideal provided the capacity is there. Mainly the reason I'd like to know the approximate amp hour rating is to avoid over discharging the battery. After all, it's certainly not intended for this type of thing but I think 25% use would be fine. Especially with a desulfate session afterwards. Plus, this thing was headed for the landfill anyway before I got ahold of it.

Thanks again,
-core
 
  #4  
Old 10-15-07, 05:36 PM
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Update:

Well, I just went in there to O'Reilly's personally, since there was one just 7 blocks from my house. This is gonna be VERY off-topic but I think it's rather funny. Even sad.

I originally went in there looking for any of the "gimmick" battery additives that are on the market (reason unrelated to this particular battery), since I am out of EDTA and needed to at least try something before waiting on shipping times. Figured I'd just ask about this particular battery whilst I checked out. I browsed the aisles for any batt chemicals at all and didn't see anything. No surprise.

I browsed the new battery display while wasting time waiting for the clerk to get done selling a new battery to a couple that was there. (More on that in a second.) Turns out they don't sell "EverStart" brand, I guess that's Wal-Mart's co-branding, but they did sell something very similar -- something like SureStart or what not. And the part numbers were very similar. No 26-5 though. Not a big deal; didn't expect them to have the exact counterpart.

But the important fact for the story here is that as I was looking over the batteries a great deal of them were normal, "low maintenance" batteries.

So when the clerk was free I asked him if they stock any battery additives. Blank look from him. In all fairness I really didn't _expect_ them to have any, but wouldn't be surprised if they had one or two gimmicky products. He proceeded to tell me that all the batteries they sell are not designed to be opened (maint free), and that they had a few that _could_ be opened but one could damage the battery attempting to do so. (!!) Thus they do not stock any battery additives.

I don't even know where to start with that paragraph. I guess from the end -- we only sell products which service exactly what we sell? By that logic they shouldn't sell electrolyte either (but they do). Hell most of the store is dedicated to servicing stuff they don't/wouldn't sell. I also wonder what he thinks all those caps are for on the batteries they sell. For potentially "damaging" the battery, no doubt.

Which brings us back to the couple I was waiting on. When I first walked into the store I saw the clerk outside using a largish meter device under their hood. Of course kudos to the corp for offering this free service. I guess the alternator was bad, because while I was passing the time looking at new batteries I overheard something like this from the counter:

"Yeah, it kinda s--ks but if your alternator goes bad your battery always needs replaced too." (Operative word here is "always".)

I'm still kicking myself for not walking up right then and there and offering the guy something for his "shot" battery. (He was able to drive the thing there, so obviously he didn't have a shorted cell, etc.) Keeping in mind this is the same clerk as mentioned above, I wonder if he didn't even bother to pop the caps to avoid "damaging the battery".

I do understand the importance of customer satisfaction. That is, if you sell them an alternator and know that their battery has been drained completely at least once, I can understand why a store would _recommend_ a new battery as well. You don't want them blaming their brand-new alternator when it's really the battery's fault. But the exchange I heard was far from that. And granted, most folks don't want to deal with batteries period, let alone any amount of time reconditioning them.

Anyway, after all of the above, when it came time to check out I didn't even remember to ask him about the amp hours for the p/n 26-5. Perhaps I'll call in during the 9-5 shift when there are more experienced folks working. That, or at least try Wal-Mart for the appropriate customer service number.
 
  #5  
Old 10-25-07, 07:40 AM
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The answer

Here's the answer, and some phone numbers just in case anyone happens upon this post via the search later on:

EverStart battery support line: 888-387-8278

I guess that line is technically only for Wal-Mart employees. They didn't ask me, but if they ask for a store number you can just give em #1764 (the one near me) or just grab the number off your receipt. While they have some info, probably just the same stuff you can find in the booklet at the store, they don't have the complete specs. Which brings us to the next number:

Exide technical support: 800-782-7848

These are the people who make EverStart's starting batteries. (The deep cycle marines are made by Johnson Controls I think.) Strangely enough it seems only one person in the office has access to such info because I was told she was away from her desk and I had to wait for a call back.

The answer is: They don't know! They don't rate their automotive batteries in Ah. I know this figure usually isn't published, but I thought they'd at least _know_. Especially since in European and Asian markets this figure is always listed.

Anyway they were at least able to tell me that the reserve capacity (RC) is 80 minutes. Using the rough AH=RC*0.6 formula I can estimate that I have about 48Ah to work with, plus or minus a handful.

Hope the phone numbers are of some use to somebody.

-core

P.S. That O'Reilly's store that a ranted about [for too long] in my last post, well last week they called in 3 fire trucks because they smelled gas. You'd think with so many mechanically inclined employees in there one of them would have thought to just turn off the gas at the meter and then wait for the gas company to show up.
 
  #6  
Old 10-25-07, 09:12 AM
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Core -

After reading your post, I am interested in
- what are the specifics of a 'desufate session'?
- how you use EDTA with the batteries (I have some).

Thanks,

Rick
 
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Old 10-25-07, 09:29 AM
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Thanks for the information and the post back Core. That's an area I'd never given much thought and I'm sure the technical end of it will benefit those reading the posts here.

Bob
 
  #8  
Old 10-25-07, 10:46 AM
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Originally Posted by formula View Post
After reading your post, I am interested in
- what are the specifics of a 'desufate session'?
- how you use EDTA with the batteries (I have some).
Regarding desulfating: One of my battery chargers has such a setting. They used to be expensive but I found this one Sam's Club for like $45. They call it battery reconditioning mode but other chargers call it pulsed charge, etc. Basically it sends a high frequency pulse into the battery which [apparently] breaks the lead sulphate crystals off your battery plates, restoring them to closer to the condition they were in before the battery got wrecked. [Wreaks havoc on your AM radio too.] I say "apparently" here because there are varied opinions on the subject and I do not know _why_ it works, I only know it does.

In my camping with a car battery example, assuming I charged the battery as soon as I got home there's almost no way any lead sulphate crystals would have had time to form. But I'd still do a 24+ hour desulfate since it'll be on the charger anyway. Which brings me to my next point:

What I'd first do no matter what is immediately charge the battery fully and then give it a 4 hour equalizing overcharge. This should prevent the formation of such crystals in the first place. Plus it has the benefit of catching up any low cells and mixing up the electrolyte from all the "boiling".

That's basically the whole of it. Not sure if you were asking about my methods, or about battery sulfation in general. If the latter you can find lots of info out there, and it starts quite a few arguments for some reason. But long story short if you leave your battery discharged for any amount of time those darned crystals are what rob your capacity and then you have to go through all this crazy stuff.

In fact right this second, while I write, I am doing a capacity test on the particular battery I originally posted about. Last week it spent 4 days on the pulse charger, and I also boiled the thing mad for a total of 12 hours in between pulse sessions. That resulted in increasing the capacity by at least 40% from where I started, before the desulfation. (No chemicals for this one.) So yeah, for a truly wrecked battery this desulphating regime takes many, many days. But I wouldn't go overboard if I just stressed a starting battery by powering my camp stuff for a day or two.


For the EDTA... Hey, I'm kinda curious, why did you happen to have EDTA if you're not using it in batteries? Well I guess it probably has a thousand uses, even heard of people drinking the stuff. (LOL don't try that at home kids)

Many people will tell you to dump a teaspoon of the powder in each cell, cap it back up, and just use the battery normally for the rest of its life. I would NOT do this. If you just want to dump-and-forget at LEAST dissolve that teaspoon in a small amount of warm water first. Within a few days you should see major improvement if sulfation was a problem.

I personally don't leave EDTA in a battery, although admittedly it's much more convenient that way. But then again I'm insane when it comes to batteries and will spend weeks reconditioning a junker worth only $40 new.

If you're sure your battery's sulfated and the overcharge and pulse methods don't work, here's what I'd do if you have the time:

Pour out all your battery acid into a bucket and put it somewhere where it will not get contaminated. That is, if you don't have new acid lying around. If I go through all this I just use new acid. Rather than fuss with a bucket I find it much easier to just dump over the battery in my lawn. Makes neat shapes in the grass too.

Dissolve at least 2 teaspoons per quart of distilled water and fill your battery with that solution. Of course your battery is unuseable at this point. Let that sit for a day or two, and I like to even give it a gentle 2 amp charge during that time. Just be sure to shut down the charger when the battery gets warm. Then shake up the battery and pour all the crud out.

Repeat this process until until you think the liquid coming out is clean enough. Then put your original electrolyte back in and you're set.

-core
 
  #9  
Old 01-02-10, 10:13 PM
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Hello

I realize this post is old and I may not get a response, but I'm curious how the equation RC*0.6 works? Can you explain this? I don't understand. If RC is how long a battery can sustain a usable charge at 25A wouldn't the equation be 25/1.333 or (25/(80/60)) Like 18.7 A/h ?

I'm just being curious. Thanks.
 
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