2000 ford f-150

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  #1  
Old 01-25-08, 08:34 AM
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Post 2000 ford f-150

i have a 2000 ford f-150 and i cannot get it to start. it was running fine one day and the next it wouldn't start. i jump started it and when i did it has a terrible rod knock and there is black stuff blowing out the tail pipe. when i go to start it it tries to start but won't completely turn over so i know its not the battery. any suggestions?
 
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Old 01-25-08, 09:20 AM
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What engine do you have? Did you get it started the time you jumped it? Now the starter can't spin the engine over, even once?

Since you had the engine noise and the black discharge from the pipe, I would start by pulling all the plugs and see if that allows the engine to turn over. You could have a blown head gasket and one or more of the cylinders may be filled with coolant.

Also check the oil to see if there is any water in it and the coolant level in the radiator.

Let us know,

Bob
 
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Old 01-25-08, 09:27 AM
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Originally Posted by marbobj View Post
What engine do you have? Did you get it started the time you jumped it? Now the starter can't spin the engine over, even once?

Since you had the engine noise and the black discharge from the pipe, I would start by pulling all the plugs and see if that allows the engine to turn over. You could have a blown head gasket and one or more of the cylinders may be filled with coolant.

Also check the oil to see if there is any water in it and the coolant level in the radiator.

Let us know,

Bob
the engine is a V6 and it did start when I jumped it. Thats when I heard the rod knock. There is no water in the oil. I was wondering if these are symptoms of somebody putting something in the gas tank, If so, how would I be able to tell for sure?
 
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Old 01-25-08, 09:35 AM
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I wouldn't make that assumption from the start. If it did occur, it would make a difference on what was put in it.

What do you have now, though - an engine that won't turn over once or an engine that won't start?

Depending on what we can eliminate as possibilities, I would say the noise you heard when it started wasn't rod knock, but spark knock = timing issue = ignition module. That would account for nearly everything you've had. It's not conclusive, but it's a good starting point.
 
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Old 01-25-08, 10:26 AM
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Originally Posted by marbobj View Post
I wouldn't make that assumption from the start. If it did occur, it would make a difference on what was put in it.

What do you have now, though - an engine that won't turn over once or an engine that won't start?

Depending on what we can eliminate as possibilities, I would say the noise you heard when it started wasn't rod knock, but spark knock = timing issue = ignition module. That would account for nearly everything you've had. It's not conclusive, but it's a good starting point.
it started once when we jumped it but it hasn't started since then so I guess I have an engine that won't start. is an ignition module expensive? does it involve alot of work to change it?
 
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Old 01-25-08, 10:42 AM
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Not overly expensive (about $45.00 - $75.00). Not a lot of work to remove. Some of those are mounted on the radiator support and some are mounted on the distributor. Either isn't too hard to remove.

Should you decide to work on it yourself, get yours checked before you buy the new one (most auto parts stores can do this) - saves you some money if yours is OK. Also when mounting make sure you have the dielectric grease to coat the mounting surface of the module with - that is a heat transfer grease.

Hope this helps,

Bob
 
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Old 01-25-08, 10:53 AM
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Originally Posted by marbobj View Post
Not overly expensive (about $45.00 - $75.00). Not a lot of work to remove. Some of those are mounted on the radiator support and some are mounted on the distributor. Either isn't too hard to remove.

Should you decide to work on it yourself, get yours checked before you buy the new one (most auto parts stores can do this) - saves you some money if yours is OK. Also when mounting make sure you have the dielectric grease to coat the mounting surface of the module with - that is a heat transfer grease.

Hope this helps,

Bob
do you have any other suggestions as to what it maybe besides this, just so i can have some ideas?
 
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Old 01-25-08, 11:13 AM
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I know you can't get it started, but if you had someone that could make a house call and pull codes for you, it may pinpoint the problem with a fault code.
 
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Old 01-26-08, 11:20 AM
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As MarbobJ said pull all of the plugs and then crank the engine.
This will tell you if you have a serious mechanical problem like a bent rod or bad bearing and if it cranks ok and sounds good chances are it is ignition related.
 
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Old 01-28-08, 07:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Mackey View Post
As MarbobJ said pull all of the plugs and then crank the engine.
This will tell you if you have a serious mechanical problem like a bent rod or bad bearing and if it cranks ok and sounds good chances are it is ignition related.
i started it yesterday and it started right up without being jumped but it is still making that knocking(almost like a ticking noise). You still think I should pull all the spark plugs and see what happens?
 
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Old 01-28-08, 02:38 PM
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Run the codes. The ECM should have stored the errors. It's a start.
 
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Old 01-28-08, 03:10 PM
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getting the codes is an excellent idea. that is on good thing about a computer, it saves data. sounds like a fuel(too much or a lack of) to me. black smoke usually means rich(too much gas). the knock sounds likea timing issue. not that expensive now but needs to be addressed. if you have a component bad, the computer will try to make it run by adjusting the settings. i think you need a good mechanic.
 
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Old 01-28-08, 04:28 PM
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Rod knocks can be located as to what cylinder it is by unplugging each spark plug wire one at a time. The knock usually goes away on the cylinder you unplug.
 
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