Seafoam Help

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  #1  
Old 02-22-08, 05:41 PM
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Seafoam Help

I tried dumping some seafoam down the throttle body throat on my 2002 Chevy Silverado 5.3L V8. Well, I ended spilling it on my belts. I know seafoam is flammable, could this cause a fire with the friction when my truck runs? Also can someone give me some detailed info on where to find a Vacuum hose to dump seafoam in on a 5.3 V8?
 
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Old 02-22-08, 05:50 PM
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I would just add it to the gas tank. As a rule it isn't a good idea to pour significant amounts of liquid into the intakes of an engine. If it collected at one cylinder it could lock the valves and cause a fair amount of damage.

I wouldn't worry too much about what you spilled on the belts. Just give them time to dry off.

Hope this helps,

Bob
 
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Old 02-23-08, 03:34 AM
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I agree with Bob. You get an inordinate imbalance of fuel or additive in one cylinder, it will blow hotter and possibly do valve or piston damage. Add it to the fuel tank. What are your symptoms and why do you think it needs to go down the throttle body? Just curious.
 
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Old 02-23-08, 06:28 AM
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I have the infamous Silverado Piston Slap due to carbon buildup. I was just following the directions on the back of the bottle. It said a third of a pint in either the throttle body or break booster line and the rest of the bottle in the gas tank. It also says to put it in the crank case, but I'm not gonna do that. I've read many articles about seafoam, Hydrolock won't happen if it is dumped in slow in and small amounts so it can be used up with the gas.
 
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Old 02-23-08, 10:31 AM
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Originally Posted by marbobj View Post
I would just add it to the gas tank. As a rule it isn't a good idea to pour significant amounts of liquid into the intakes of an engine. If it collected at one cylinder it could lock the valves and cause a fair amount of damage.

I wouldn't worry too much about what you spilled on the belts. Just give them time to dry off.

Hope this helps,

Bob
We are talking "Hydro-Static" lock here. Liquids won't compress like air does so if you get too much liquid in a cylinder you will bend a connecting rod, break a piston or other bad things. It won't lock the valves or blow hotter??? Use "Top Tier Fuel" on a regular basis and you will remove most of the carbon that is built up on the valves and combustion chamber.
 
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Old 02-23-08, 10:42 AM
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Too Late! Seafoam worked great! My engine dosen't hesitate anymore, I punch it to the floor and it goes, It has way more power, runs smoother, And no more cold ticking! Put half in the brake booster line and the other half in the gas tank. Got a lot of nasty crap out of my exaust too. I'm very pleased! If it is done right...you won't damage anything!
 
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Old 02-23-08, 11:42 PM
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Dude

Hope you don't regret this later, all I have is chevys and never ever have any trouble with carbon build up , its like people on diesel forums complaining about diesel soot, its all part of the process..
I have a 2000 sierra C2500 with the 5.3l ( 200 k miles ), a 2000 K2500 suburban ( 110 k miles ) with the 6.0l and a 2007 K3500 with the 6.6l diesel ( 28k miles ) and let me tell you dude thats what keeps the engines going man...don't be afraid of a little carbon or soot ...
sorry just my 2 cents...
 
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Old 02-24-08, 06:56 AM
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Originally Posted by SLJ2137694 View Post
It won't lock the valves or blow hotter???
I don't know about the blow hotter, but yes it can lock the valves in that cylinder. That is exactly why it does the damage. The valves are locked shut and the liquid, like Steven says, won't compress and something has to give. Usually the first damage is in the valve train.

Bob
 
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Old 02-24-08, 08:20 AM
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Engine Theory Of Operation 101

Originally Posted by LouBazooka View Post
Hope you don't regret this later, all I have is chevys and never ever have any trouble with carbon build up , its like people on diesel forums complaining about diesel soot, its all part of the process..
I have a 2000 sierra C2500 with the 5.3l ( 200 k miles ), a 2000 K2500 suburban ( 110 k miles ) with the 6.0l and a 2007 K3500 with the 6.6l diesel ( 28k miles ) and let me tell you dude thats what keeps the engines going man...don't be afraid of a little carbon or soot ...
sorry just my 2 cents...
Lou, I wonder if you might be using a Top Tier Fuel?
http://toptiergas.com/ I have seen it work wonders.

As far as the valves being locked shut, keep in mind we are talking about the compression stroke here and the valves are closed anyway and remain closed through most of the power stroke. The exhaust valve will then open and there is nothing to prevent that because the liquid in the cylinder would not be under any pressure. The intake valve also closes long before TDC of the compression stroke, so here again the valve is already closed and cannot sustain any damage.
 
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Old 02-24-08, 01:38 PM
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I believe the point the damage to the valve train occurs is at the transition from the exhaust to the intake stroke as opposed to the compression stroke. I always thought along the same lines, but it was always the valve train that took the beating. It wasn't the valve facing, but the stem, rockers, and pushrods, where applicable. I always thought it had to do with valve overlap, but there could be something else there.

Over the years I probably saw it four or five times - always the valve train. Another consideration was you would never have the cylinder completely without air since you would have to fill it from the top of the combustion chamber to get that much fluid in it. Just what that explains, I dunno .
 
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Old 02-25-08, 08:42 AM
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This is the best thing that has ever happened to my trucks! I did 1 of my cars, and another one of my trucks over the weekend. I'm still very pleased!
 
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