1993 Honda LX station Wagon Brake Problem

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  #1  
Old 03-06-08, 02:16 PM
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1993 Honda LX station Wagon Brake Problem

I have a 1993 Honda St Wagon LX with apprx 150K miles. Car is in good shape considering age. However, it is rarely driven, probably less than 100 miles/mth. I have noticed that brake pedal has been going practically all the way to the floorboard. So, I get my manual out to read. First, I check the brake fluid and find that it is about empty, way below the minimum line in the reservoir. So, I fill it up with some DOT3. This really has not helped situation. There is no indication of any leaks. Any other ideas you can give me before I take car to my local Honda mechanic?

Thanks in advance for your suggestions/advice.
 
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Old 03-06-08, 03:17 PM
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It obviously leaked out of somewhere: Master, slaves, lines, fittings, or hoses. Not much you can or are going to do, since you said you are taking it somewhere.

If the fluid was too low, as stated, you could still have spongy brakes even if you filled the reservoirs back up. You'd have to bleed out the air. Passenger rear, drivers rear, passenger front, drivers front, in that order.
 
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Old 03-07-08, 05:19 AM
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ecman

First, thank you for your reply.

I will have my Honda shop check for leaks. As stated in original post, I have seen no evidence of leaks as car sits most of time on a concrete driveway.

For information, how long does it take to bleed the brake lines on a 93 Honda LX wagon?

Thanks again.
 
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Old 03-07-08, 07:27 AM
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What can happen if the leak is slow, at say one of the wheel cylinders, is it runs down the backplate, might get on the wheel, and then kind of spins off, or spreads out and dries some while driving. You have to just lay down and check the insides of the wheels to see if you have oily wet spots back there. If a leak were in a line, that was slow, it too could have say wind from driving get it to spread out onto surrounding metal, without necessarily dropping off on the ground, as least to any significance. Metal seems to wick up oil. How I don't know. It jsut does.

Bleeding brakes is bleeding brakes, to my knowledge. I don't think there is a significant difference between makes, I wouldn't imagine anyway.
 
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