99' Chevy transmission

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Old 03-15-08, 10:38 PM
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Exclamation 99' Chevy transmission

Hi, I'm James and I have a small problem. I have a 99' Chevy Malibu and I wanted to check my transmission fluid, but my car does not have a stick. How do I check it? And... If I check it and I need fluid how do I know how much to add? In other words, How do I know when to stop pouring?

Thanks, James
 
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Old 03-16-08, 08:06 AM
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No dipstick ? There has to be, or did you loose it?
 
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Old 03-16-08, 08:08 AM
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There are several makes/models that no longer have a dipstick. Guess the engineers decided they'll never leak. As far as I know, the way to check/fill is the same as if you were doing the rear end on a rear wheel drive. Locate the filler plug and add fluid until it comes out the hole. Personally I prefer a dipstick & tube.
 
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Old 03-16-08, 08:49 AM
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Originally Posted by jnssylvest View Post
Hi, I'm James and I have a small problem. I have a 99' Chevy Malibu and I wanted to check my transmission fluid, but my car does not have a stick. How do I check it? And... If I check it and I need fluid how do I know how much to add? In other words, How do I know when to stop pouring?

Thanks, James
Start the engine and allow the engine to idle until the transmission fluid temperature has reached the value specified. Depress the brake pedal and move the shift lever through the gear ranges, pausing a few seconds in each range. Return the shift lever to the PARK range. Raise the vehicle on a hoist. The vehicle must be level, with the engine running and the shift lever in the PARK range. CautionThe engine must be running when the transmission fluid fill plug is removed, or excessive fluid loss will occur. Transmission fluid may be hot. Since the actual fluid level is unknown, stand clear when removing the fill plug. Have a container ready to capture any lost fluid. Do not turn the engine off with the fill plug removed, as you can be injured by hot transmission fluid being expelled out of the oil fill opening.
Remove the transmission plug.
Important
The transmission fluid may darken with normal use and does not always indicate contamination or oxidation.
Transmission fluid (At least 104°F) 5-10 minutes at idle will give correct temp.
Does the fluid have a burnt odor or a dark brown color?Check the fluid level. The fluid level should be even with the bottom of the threaded plug hole.Is the fluid level low?
Add DEXRON® III automatic transmission fluid in increments of 0.5L until the fluid drains from the plug hole.
Install plug before stopping engine or fluid will spill out of plug hole.
Pan drop and filter change 7.5 qts
Check plug is just to the right of the passenger side axle housing , 11 mm plug, can't miss it, only one there.
Hoist is optional, just needs to be level and plug accessible.
Check plug location.
http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f9...G_0624_1_1.jpg
 
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Old 03-16-08, 10:38 AM
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FYI, DEXRON VI is the latest ATF and should be used in automatic transmissions that used to specify DEXRON III.
 
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Old 03-16-08, 03:05 PM
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Dexron jumped from III to VI???
 
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Old 03-16-08, 07:12 PM
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Unhappy

Originally Posted by the_tow_guy View Post
There are several makes/models that no longer have a dipstick. Guess the engineers decided they'll never leak. As far as I know, the way to check/fill is the same as if you were doing the rear end on a rear wheel drive. Locate the filler plug and add fluid until it comes out the hole. Personally I prefer a dipstick & tube.
sounds as if they don't want DIY'ers working on their vehicles! this is news to me. i have a 2000 caddy and 2002 silverado and they have dipsticks(besides me!). learn something new every day!!!
 
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Old 03-17-08, 05:40 AM
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it's just plain cheap and a PIA for any of us...the bottomline is that some bean counter proposed leaving them off as a cost reduction measure...and it stuck.
 
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Old 03-17-08, 09:07 AM
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Originally Posted by the_tow_guy View Post
Dexron jumped from III to VI???
I have pondered that one too!?! I don't know the reason for that jump.
 
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Old 03-17-08, 10:03 AM
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Originally Posted by carguyinva View Post
it's just plain cheap and a PIA for any of us...the bottomline is that some bean counter proposed leaving them off as a cost reduction measure...and it stuck.
Chevy isn't the only one to do it. Ask any VW/Audi DIY'er and they'll tell you how much of a PITA it is to do any tranny work on thier cars. First of all you have to buy a special 17mm Allen wrench just to drain the fluid. Then you have to pump the fluid up and into the sump through the stand pipe. Then you need a special sensor to check the level of the fluid.

On BMW's, at least the M3's...no dipstick. But it still isn't that hard to change the fluid. But with BMW's they claim their tranny fluid is good for life, so you shouldn't have to check, and with the newer Beemers, BMW does the service anyway.

As for the bean counter, I don't think it was a cost cutting measure as much as a money maker. If you can't do it, the stealership has to and their prices are expensive.
 
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Old 03-17-08, 10:21 AM
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the factory doesn't make anything on service and could really give a rats ass about dealer techs...it's a bout cost cutting. if they can cut a foot of wire out of a car to save pennies during production, they do it. just multiply the number of stickless units by units sold and you see what i mean
 
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Old 03-17-08, 10:33 AM
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Originally Posted by SLJ2137694 View Post
I have pondered that one too!?! I don't know the reason for that jump.
Dexron VI = Viscosity Improver not 6.
 
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Old 03-17-08, 11:14 AM
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Originally Posted by slls View Post
Dexron VI = Viscosity Improver not 6.
So Sorry but you are wrong! I have many GM published articles on DEXRON VI and none of them says anything about the VI standing for Viscosity Improver. It stands for 6 in Roman Numerals only. I'm courious, what do you think the III in DEXRON III stands for? I have copied one of the GM DEXRON VI articles below.

In early 2005, General Motors released a newly developed automatic transmission fluid (ATF) for the factory fill of all GM Powertrain stepped-gear automatic transmissions. The new fluid provides significantly improved performance in terms of friction durability, viscosity stability, aeration and foam control and oxidation resistance. In addition, the fluid has the potential to enable improved fuel economy and extended drain intervals. Because the performance of the new fluid far exceeded that of the DEXRON-III service-fill fluids available at the time, it became necessary to upgrade the DEXRON service-fill specification in order to ensure that similar fluids were available in the market for service situations. This latest upgrade to the service- fill specification is designated DEXRON-VI (fig. 1).



Since General Motors introduced the first ATF service-fill specification in 1949, it has been necessary to upgrade the specification periodically.

The upgrading process ensures that available service-fill fluids are of an appropriate quality for use in transmissions that have been designed around the factory-fill fluid performance.

TIP: As with previous upgrades, DEXRON-VI fluids are designed to be backward compatible with earlier transmission hardware. More importantly, earlier type fluids are not forward compatible with transmission hardware that was designed to use DEXRON-VI fluid.

DEXRON-III is not compatible with the most recently designed transmissions, and the use of these earlier type fluids could result in transmission damage. All current calibrations and certification tests are now conducted with DEXRON-VI ATF. DEXRON-III fluids should not be used for those applications where the owner manual recommends the use of DEXRON-VI.

TIP: GM does not license or support obsolete ATF specifications or the use of fluids that are being marketed against cancelled specifications.

All DEXRON-III licenses expired at the end of 2006 and will not be renewed. Beyond that date, GM will support only DEXRON-VI fluids for use in Hydra-Matic transmissions. Avoid fluids sold in the market after that date bearing claims such as “suitable for use in
DEXRON-III applications” or similar wording. DEXRON-VI licensed fluids are fully backward compatible and can be used in all applications covered by earlier GM ATF specifications.

The use of unlicensed fluids and/or non-GM approved aftermarket additives may prove detrimental to transmission performance and void warranty coverage.

- Thanks to ------------ name removed

Precaution: DEXRON-VI in Manual Transmissions

When DEXRON-III is indicated as the fluid fill for manual transmissions and transfer cases, DO NOT use DEXRON-VI. Instead, use GM Manual Transmission Fluid p/n 88861800 in these components.

TIP: Refer to PIP3836B (Feb. 2007).

If the manual transmission or transfer case indicates use of DEXRON-VI, then, of course, it should be used.

Purging Equipment

Before filling your bulk fluid equipment with DEXRON-VI, be sure to purge the old oil from it.

Also, be sure to purge your J-45096 Transflow machine before using it with DEXRON-VI.
 
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Old 03-17-08, 11:24 AM
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my .02 worth...i've seen the chemical and performance data on Dex VI and it outperforms Dex III by leaps and bounds. widespread use will have a very noticeable effect on automatic trans longevity and driveability.
 
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Old 03-17-08, 11:43 AM
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Here's some more info from GM on DEXRON VI.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dexron VI During the first six months of 2005, GM Powertrain will transition from Dexron III Automatic Transmission Fluid to Dexron VI.

Dexron VI offers the following longer-life characteristics:

Extended factory fill for life
150K miles for cars
200K miles for trucks

Clutch friction stability
Improved 100%

Clutch durability due to fluid
Improved 120%

Oil film thickness
Increased 20%

Fluid oxidation
Improved 100%

Foam / aeration
Improved 150%

Shear stability
Improved 200%


TIP: Dexron III and Dexron VI can be mixed with no problem.

- Thanks to ---------- name removed
 
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Old 03-18-08, 11:51 AM
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Originally Posted by SLJ2137694 View Post
So Sorry but you are wrong! I have many GM published articles on DEXRON VI and none of them says anything about the VI standing for Viscosity Improver. It stands for 6 in Roman Numerals only. I'm courious, what do you think the III in DEXRON III stands for? I have copied one of the GM DEXRON VI articles below.

In early 2005, General Motors released a newly developed automatic transmission fluid (ATF) for the factory fill of all GM Powertrain stepped-gear automatic transmissions. The new fluid provides significantly improved performance in terms of friction durability, viscosity stability, aeration and foam control and oxidation resistance. In addition, the fluid has the potential to enable improved fuel economy and extended drain intervals. Because the performance of the new fluid far exceeded that of the DEXRON-III service-fill fluids available at the time, it became necessary to upgrade the DEXRON service-fill specification in order to ensure that similar fluids were available in the market for service situations. This latest upgrade to the service- fill specification is designated DEXRON-VI (fig. 1).



Since General Motors introduced the first ATF service-fill specification in 1949, it has been necessary to upgrade the specification periodically.

The upgrading process ensures that available service-fill fluids are of an appropriate quality for use in transmissions that have been designed around the factory-fill fluid performance.

TIP: As with previous upgrades, DEXRON-VI fluids are designed to be backward compatible with earlier transmission hardware. More importantly, earlier type fluids are not forward compatible with transmission hardware that was designed to use DEXRON-VI fluid.

DEXRON-III is not compatible with the most recently designed transmissions, and the use of these earlier type fluids could result in transmission damage. All current calibrations and certification tests are now conducted with DEXRON-VI ATF. DEXRON-III fluids should not be used for those applications where the owner manual recommends the use of DEXRON-VI.

TIP: GM does not license or support obsolete ATF specifications or the use of fluids that are being marketed against cancelled specifications.

All DEXRON-III licenses expired at the end of 2006 and will not be renewed. Beyond that date, GM will support only DEXRON-VI fluids for use in Hydra-Matic transmissions. Avoid fluids sold in the market after that date bearing claims such as “suitable for use in
DEXRON-III applications” or similar wording. DEXRON-VI licensed fluids are fully backward compatible and can be used in all applications covered by earlier GM ATF specifications.

The use of unlicensed fluids and/or non-GM approved aftermarket additives may prove detrimental to transmission performance and void warranty coverage.

- Thanks to ------------ name removed

Precaution: DEXRON-VI in Manual Transmissions

When DEXRON-III is indicated as the fluid fill for manual transmissions and transfer cases, DO NOT use DEXRON-VI. Instead, use GM Manual Transmission Fluid p/n 88861800 in these components.

TIP: Refer to PIP3836B (Feb. 2007).

If the manual transmission or transfer case indicates use of DEXRON-VI, then, of course, it should be used.

Purging Equipment

Before filling your bulk fluid equipment with DEXRON-VI, be sure to purge the old oil from it.

Also, be sure to purge your J-45096 Transflow machine before using it with DEXRON-VI.
I looked for the original article which states it means Viscosity Improver, but it was a year or so ago. Well if Dexron 11 and Dexron 111 are roman numerals what happened to IV and V, GM as always went in sequence. The Dexron VI is so good and costs so much because it is at least semi synthetic.
 
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Old 03-18-08, 12:35 PM
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Well if Dexron 11 and Dexron 111 are roman numerals what happened to IV and V, GM as always went in sequence.

and even more confusing...where does Dexron III (G) and Dexron III (H) fit in...and for the burning question of the day...

why do so many folks call it "Dextron"...alas, perhaps it's a southern thing...er, I mean...thang!

 
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Old 03-19-08, 09:10 AM
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In case anyone is interested I just bought Dexron VI in Walmart for $2.97 a quart.
 
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Old 03-19-08, 07:53 PM
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Cool

Originally Posted by carguyinva View Post
Well if Dexron 11 and Dexron 111 are roman numerals what happened to IV and V, GM as always went in sequence.

and even more confusing...where does Dexron III (G) and Dexron III (H) fit in...and for the burning question of the day...

why do so many folks call it "Dextron"...alas, perhaps it's a southern thing...er, I mean...thang!

don't "yall" say "thang" in Va.? i thought Va. was a southern state?! we-uns only gradiate 6th grade!!
 
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Old 03-19-08, 09:05 PM
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i may have been born and bred a dang rebel...but i come from good old fashioned New England stock...brotha!
 
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