1989 Toyota pickup 22r distributor help

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  #1  
Old 07-10-08, 08:20 AM
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1989 Toyota pickup 22r distributor help

So, I recently inherited a 1989 toyota pickup 22r 4 speed as a project. The previous owner believed that it has either a cracked head or a blown head gasket. My friend and I began engine disassembly and found that coolant had mixed in with the oil and had become a carmel-colored froth. Anyways, we are trying to take the distributor out and have come across challenges. Our book states to remove the pinch bolt and it should slide out, but we can not for the life of us figure out what a pinch bolt is or what we should be doing. Please help us! As we venture farther into the depths of this motor, is there anything else we should be careful to look for?
 
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Old 07-10-08, 10:04 AM
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First set the engine to TDC and mark the rotor location on the distributor for an easier reassembly. Then... there's a little clamp at the base of the distributor. Take that bolt out and the distributor will slide out.

When you reassemble the head to block make absolutely sure (that's absolutely sure) you have the crank set at TDC and the cam has the timing mark straight up. That is a remarkable engine, but it is a valve smacker.

Are you working on it in frame or do you have it out?
 
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Old 07-10-08, 03:44 PM
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Thanks, I will try that next chance that I get to work on it. Hopefully this weekend. I am working on it in the truck.
 
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Old 08-03-08, 10:03 AM
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I still can not figure it out. This is what I have done...

If you look straight at the distributor from the driver's side of the truck, I have removed a bolt (I believe it was a 14mm) from the right (towards the rear of the truck) and a small screw on the top of the distributor. I can not find any other bolts, but it is still attached as well as ever and will not budge.
 
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Old 08-03-08, 10:18 AM
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The bolt that holds the distributor down uses a clamp shaped jobby to accomplish that. Wait - rephrasing that. Your's doesn't have the clamp. The bolt just goes through a grooved casting. Was the bolt through a hole in something like that? With the mounting bolt removed you should be able to rotate the distributor.

If it was and you can.......

Put the little screw back where it came from before you lose it and either pull up or pry on the distributor's aluminum base. It's just stuck in the mounting hole.

Here's an Autozone link to help you out.

http://www.autozone.com/shopping/rep...00c1528005ff93
 
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Old 08-09-08, 07:48 PM
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So, I pried it off and kept going. Thanks for the help. Now, I am to the point of taking the head off. All of the head bolts came out easily except for one. I have taken it out far enough that there are no threads holding it in. The problem is that I can't get it out. I think that it is jammed or there is soot of some sort clogging it. I called my big 250lb wrestler of a neighbor and he couldn't get it out. Are there any suggestions?
 
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Old 08-09-08, 09:24 PM
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The head bolt is out of the block and stuck in the head? Usually if you keep turning it, it will come up out of the head. Otherwise drive it out with a hardwood dowel. Then the bolt hole in the head will need to be cleaned with a drill, file, or something similar.
When you clean it make sure you don't take any aluminum material out.
 
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Old 08-19-08, 01:08 PM
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So the head is off, and I found coolant in the cylinders, there is a guide to the timing chain that has snapped off and the chain has left grooves in the sides of its cover. Where would you guys go from here? Does it sound like I have major problems because of the coolant in the cylinders? Should I take the head and have it looked at or not even bother? Would a rebuilt motor be my best option? I need some guidance here.
 
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Old 08-19-08, 07:45 PM
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I did a quick check and a Jasper reman runs about $2300; I'll think you find similar prices for a decent reman from any reputable source. Probably no reason you can't resurrect yours. Send the head out for a good inspection at a machine shop, replace the broken & worn parts, and bolt it back together.

The coolant in the cyclinders would not be a problem as long as you didn't get any full enough to bend a rod. Some of the coolant got in their simply by taking the head off. The coolant in the oil would be more of a concern as the watered-down oil would cause a reduced lubrication of the moving parts, especially main and rod bearings.
 
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Old 08-21-08, 02:28 PM
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So the head is at the machine shop getting cleaned, resurfaced, get a valve job, and checked for cracks. I am going to continue to get to the timing chain, which has broken the guides and ground nice grooves into the cover. I am definitely going to get a new timing kit and cover. My fingers are crossed. Is there anything else I should be looking for?
 
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Old 08-21-08, 07:18 PM
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Nothing really springs to mind, just the usual repair practices, i.e. making sure all gasket surfaces are completely cleaned up, that sort of thing.

Think I would replace the water pump and thermostat if it's not already planned. Fresh hoses wouldn't hurt either. Wouldn't want to put all this labor into it and have it overheat on the test drive.
 
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Old 08-21-08, 08:48 PM
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My son had the same problem with his old Toyota (22R). When the valve chain tensioner gave up the ghost, it allowed the chain to slap the cover to the point that it wore a hole through which allowed the coolant to flow into the timing chain area and down to the oil pan. We had to replace the cover, seal, timing chain follower, and timing chain. I can't recall if the sprockets were replaced or not, as this was several years ago. It took two oil and filter changes to remove all the water from the engine.
 
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Old 08-21-08, 10:42 PM
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I am sort of hoping that the chain ground through the timing chain cover. If this is true, then there won't be any unexpected costs when I am diagnosing the problem since I was planning on replacing it anyway. Should I replace the guides with the OEM plastic ones or should I splurge and get the steel ones that cost 3 times as much?
 
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Old 08-22-08, 04:19 AM
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Sort of depends on how long exactly that you expect to keep it. What are the actual prices for the parts?
 
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Old 08-22-08, 05:04 AM
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The OEM jobs will last about 80,000. I would replace the tensioner for that chain as well.

When you install the head, follow the head bolt torque sequence in three stages of tightening. The timing chain uses bright links to locate the chain on the sprockets - make sure you have those right and the engine crank is at TDC when you put the head on. That engine will bend valves.
 
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Old 08-28-08, 11:10 PM
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So, the newest problem is the crankshaft pulley. I am attempting to take the timing chain cover next and I can not for the life of me get the pulley to budge without pumping the cylinders. I have tried putting some bolts in and using a breaker bar to stop if from rotating, but that gave me no success, next up is the impact gun. Do you think I should try something else first?
Good news though, I just got word from the machine shop, the head has no cracks, has been resurfaced, and has all new valves and is ready to be put back in... whenever that happens.
 
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Old 08-29-08, 04:33 AM
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Impact gun is fastest and easiest.
 
  #18  
Old 09-02-08, 08:26 AM
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Okay, newest problem... Is the only way to take the oil pan off is to life the engine out. So far, I have been able to do everything with the engine still in, but now I need to take the oil pan off in order to change the piston rings. Am I going to hate myself if I try to do this with the engine still in or is it possible?
 
  #19  
Old 09-02-08, 06:33 PM
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Can't say for certain on your Toy, but on a lot of cars you need to unbolt the motor mounts and raise the engine slightly for the pan to clear. You rarely have to yank the engine all the way out.
 
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