Restoring Car

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  #1  
Old 09-11-08, 09:26 AM
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Restoring Car

Hello All,
I am restoring a 1972 Triumph GT6 and the gas tank is empty. Do I have to do anything with it before I fill it up with gas, would there be rust inside or anything else that could corrode and how would I get into it without too much cost if I need to.
Thanks
Randy
 
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  #2  
Old 09-11-08, 09:53 AM
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Originally Posted by RandyAsselstine View Post
Hello All,
I am restoring a 1972 Triumph GT6 and the gas tank is empty. Do I have to do anything with it before I fill it up with gas, would there be rust inside or anything else that could corrode and how would I get into it without too much cost if I need to.
Thanks
Randy
Hello Randy,

How long has the car been sitting? You may have to take and clean out the tank as well as the gas lines. Gas can leave some nasty deposits when it is allowed to sit and evaporate. You may have residual on the bottom of the tank. It can cause some issues if you try to run it through the engine. I would suggest removing and ispecting the tank and perhaps the lines.

Is this your first restore?
 
  #3  
Old 09-11-08, 01:44 PM
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Use a flashlight and maybe a little mirror to see what you can of th inside. Removing the sending unit will probably be your best way to see into the interior.

Personally I'd clean it just to be safe. The fuel lines can be blown out with an air compressor - if there is any resistance it's best to replace them.
 
  #4  
Old 09-12-08, 06:55 AM
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The car has been sitting for 20 years and it is my first restore. I am the second owner.
 
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Old 09-12-08, 07:17 AM
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Originally Posted by RandyAsselstine View Post
The car has been sitting for 20 years and it is my first restore. I am the second owner.
Wow - 20 years is a long time. You will have to replace a lot of rubber. Most things on a car need to be used on a regular basis to work correctly. You will probably also have to carefully inspect the brake system. When brake fluid sits for a long time it can become water contaminated and is not safe. The transmission fluid may need to be checked as well. Sitting is actually very hard on a car. Sorry, I'm not trying to steer you away from your restore - it can be TONS of fun and very rewarding, but it can be tough as well. I would try searching for a forum specific to your car. The amount of knowledge these people have can be invaluable, especially if this is your first.

Good luck!
 
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Old 09-12-08, 08:51 AM
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1972 Gt6

Thanks for the info. The tranny is a sealed unit, 4 speed manual. How do you change the fluid?
 
  #7  
Old 09-12-08, 09:23 AM
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The tranny probably has several plugs on one side. The higher one is the fill plug and the lower is the drain.

If you do a serious web search, you can find restoration sites devoted to about any car. Great for finding parts, and someone may well have a factory manual, which would be invaluable to you.
 
  #8  
Old 09-12-08, 09:58 AM
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cleaning gas tank

You can almost bet that the tank has rust after sitting that long. You can clean it out but the rust will continue to give you trouble. There is a product that coats the inside of the tank that seems to give good results. Do a search and you will find it.Good luck. RW
 
  #9  
Old 09-12-08, 10:18 AM
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1972 Triumph GT6 Mark 3

Beautiful, Great tips, nice to get some more opinions to substantiate my original thoughts. It's hard to open something up like a gas tank without other opinions and advise.
 
  #10  
Old 09-13-08, 07:23 AM
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Gas tank bottom gas line fitting

The gas line threaded fitting to the bottom of the gas tank is all rusted and doesn't move, I may have bent the nut by putting too much pressure on it. I tried penetrating fluid to no avail, cannot use heat, any suggestion to help?
 
  #11  
Old 09-13-08, 07:38 AM
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cut the line off next to the nut and use a six point socket on the nut with a backer wrench on the fitting to the tank if possible, then run new line to the tank, that size line is cheap and to old is probably to rusted or full of debris to use any way.

are you going to cowboy up or just lay there and bleed?
 
  #12  
Old 09-13-08, 07:48 AM
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I'm going to cowboy up. The nut is probably bent now, so I guess I will have to use vise grips if the socket doesn't work. What happens if it still doesn't turn, Drilling?
 
  #13  
Old 09-13-08, 03:27 PM
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if you still can't get it to turn take a hammer and hit it a couple of sharp raps, don't whale on it. then see if it will turn, if not then yes probably drilling as heating would not be a smart idea.

life begins when the kids leave home and the dog dies
 
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Old 09-13-08, 07:00 PM
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Thanks Speedwrench,
Cut it and hit it with socket on it and sprayed it and hit it with socket on it and it turned. It was impossible to do it with a wrench.
New line tomorrow
 
  #15  
Old 09-13-08, 08:38 PM
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awsome, thanks for keeping us posted.

Murphy was an optimist
 
  #16  
Old 09-14-08, 02:52 PM
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Triumph Gt6 Mk3

Still working on the gas line, Should I use a straight line metal line or separate it with rubber connectors?
 
  #17  
Old 09-14-08, 04:06 PM
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GT6 Gas line

When I pulled the gas line out of the gas tank it had a grommet instead of a flange should I use a grommet or should I try to put the flange all the way in to the bottom of the fitting close to the gas tank.
 
  #18  
Old 09-14-08, 04:41 PM
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If I had a car that old and sitting that long I would seriously be looking into replaceing the tank and sender unit if it isn't too much $$$$. Replacing it will definitely save you many headaches and money down the road not to mention It'll look great sporting a bran new shinny fuel tank.
 
  #19  
Old 09-14-08, 07:18 PM
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if you have the tubing benders to make a straight metal line fit properly I would do that. but adding rubber is ok. just make sure that it can't be easily pulled off. i will say i am unfamiliar with old brit vehicles so i would probably check about the grommet that may be necessary to seal it properly.

if we're not supposed to eat animals why are they made out of meat?
 
  #20  
Old 09-15-08, 08:23 AM
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gas line

Might consider copper line,its easier to bend and it wont rust. Just a thought. RW
 
  #21  
Old 09-15-08, 10:01 AM
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I think the rubber will be ok as long as you make certain you have a solid seal. I think the metal lines look better though, IMO. Also you may want to consider what Mackey mentioned and think about just replacing. I am pretty sure there are original equipment or at least repro parts available for your vehicle.

Good to hear the bolt came loose. I have been fighting that a lot on my restore. I have found PB Blaster to work the best so far. That is what all the people on my forum have suggested.

Thanks for the updates btw! Nice to hear how it is going.
 
  #22  
Old 09-17-08, 04:38 PM
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Leaf springs triumph GT6

Hi,
Does the top plate of the back leaf springs have a split plate for some reason. This one is split along the leafs right in the middle with bolt downs on each side is that the way it's suppose to be?
 
  #23  
Old 09-17-08, 04:41 PM
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Hi,
I was going to use a aluminum baseball bat as a guide to bend the metal gas line tube. How do you not crimp the tube, heat it? or just be carefull
 
  #24  
Old 09-17-08, 07:41 PM
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never seen one that was split so i vote for no should not be split,
you can use something like the bat but i would purchase a tubing bender, something like this one works great.
http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...70_33396_33396

are you going to cowboy up or just lay there and bleed?
 
  #25  
Old 09-19-08, 04:31 PM
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Split top plate of leaf springs- GT 6 -and welding.

Hello,

Can you arc weld the top plate as a replacement will take forever, plus I am starting the bodywork and I have 2 large sheets of galvanized metal, 22 gauge or better. Can I mig weld this metal and cut it with an angle grinder and circular saw with a metal blades or are the odours and gases toxic?!
 
  #26  
Old 09-19-08, 08:26 PM
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yes you can arc weld it, do it outdoors welding fumes are toxic especilly when galvanized. as far as the 22 ga, a mig will work just keep the welds short or they will cause buckling as the metal heats and expands. you will have to wait several minutes between each weld for the metal to cool to avoid warping. cut with either one, but a air saw will cause less problems than the grinder or circular saw.

Murphy was an optimist
 
  #27  
Old 09-21-08, 04:48 PM
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Thanx speedwrench,
Welded a nice straight bead along the retainig plate, good and strong, saved time and money and came out with the same result.
now on to the floor boards, should I cut and measure a full piece as it is rusted out or can I piece it in for easy install and then seal. Remember it's inside and the carpet will cover everything. I think I will pop rivet and seaal with tremclad and goo sealant.
Thx
Randy
 
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Old 09-21-08, 09:04 PM
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best would be to cut and measure a full piece, but if the metal you will leave is in good shape you can piece it in, mostly it depends on whether or not you are planning on showing this car. if shows are in your future, do the full piece.

Whitworth Sockets: Once used for working on older british cars and motorcycles, they are now used mainly for impersonating that 9/16th or ? socket you've been searching for, over the last 45 minutes.
 
  #29  
Old 09-22-08, 08:15 AM
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Thanks, Shows are not in the future, goina drive it. I think, since I have more than enough metal, I will do 2 plates, one inside and 1 flat one under the car, under the seat or would that be too much metal? Would that detract or add to the appearance and vintage?
 
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Old 09-22-08, 08:14 PM
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if done with a smooth apperance that blends it in with the existing body should be good the main thing about appearance is making it look like original.

life begins when the kids leave home and the dog dies
 
  #31  
Old 09-24-08, 03:35 PM
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Hey Speedwrench, thanks for all the great advise!
I am finished riveting the floorboard together under the driver seat and would like to seal the bottom around the galvanized. I have tried to mig weld but it doesn't take. I know I could silver solder but I was thinking silicone because it has come a long way and cover with acrylic caulking, so that I can paint it.
Whataya think.
 
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