Synthetic transmission fluid

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  #1  
Old 03-18-09, 06:29 PM
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Synthetic transmission fluid

Hi, folks-
I recently changed to a synthetic motor oil and already there's a difference.
Toyota 4 cyl usually spooling 2200rpm at 60mph.
Now doing 60mph at around 2175 - not much but a very definite improvement.
Now I'm looking at synthetic transmission fluid.
Are some definitely better than others?
I went with Castrol Syntech for the motor oil
 
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  #2  
Old 03-19-09, 09:02 AM
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Synthetic engine oil isn't going to change the gear ratios. Your final drive ratio is still the same and I doubt that you have something accurate enough to read a 25 RPM differance. 2200 RPM at 60 MPH is still going to be 2200 RPM at 60 MPH. I am a firm believer in synthetic fluids. I have used Mobil synthetic for the past 30 years and if I was shopping for a synthetic ATF I would look at Mobil first.
 
  #3  
Old 03-19-09, 09:29 AM
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I'll buy some Mobil 1. I've heard only good things about the stuff - explains the higher price.
 
  #4  
Old 03-20-09, 11:23 AM
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well, being a hard core synth user for yrs, here's my observations:
1. you always get what you pay for. low end synth - yeah, it sounds good, but don't expect much difference though.
2. if you can efford - and it is, in long run, cheaper this way - go for Amsoil product. Oils are warranted to 25000 miles, I do 12 to 15000 miles oil changes, depending on a vehicle. for yrs, I was hardcore Royal Purple user, but slowly switched to Amsoil.
3. now, you have to be careful with ATFs. esp for Toyotas and Hondas, also, German makes. Say, Honda tells you to use regular motor oil in their manual gear box, as example. Toyotas and Lexi are very picky on ATFs and have their own blend that I'd stick to. I think, only Amsoil guarantees their ATF for Toyotas.
This being said, read the back of the label. If it does say that it is good for Toyota - then yes. But, you might find it hard to come across those, as I had a Corolla and have a Lexus now, and it is not easy. Better safe than sorry, I must say. It's not my Chevy truck - runs on anything that burns and anything that is slippery for oil.
 
  #5  
Old 03-22-09, 10:44 PM
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Synthetic oil

I been using AMS-OIL # ARO 20w-50 for 17 years or so on all my vehicles, 4 cars, RV, 2 steet bikes, and 3 off road bikes, I would not use anything else, this AMS OIL # ARO is aproved for commercial diesel, Gas, motorcycles,and a few more applications

my 1985 Diesel 4x4 suburban has 260.000 miles on it and the only I done to it is rebiuld the injection pump and injectors at 210.000 miles.

I change oil filter every5,000 miles, and the oil at 10,000 miles
 
  #6  
Old 03-24-09, 10:33 PM
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I would not recommend changing AUTOMATIC transmission fluid with synthetic! Here is why, firstly I did not listen when other people cautioned me and have lost two transmissions due to this. secondly all manufacturers of newer cars started adding special ingredients in their tranny fluids to keep the seals conditioned and produce the proper cooling and anti-slippage agents.

I'm not saying that Synthetic is bad oil, it's probably superior to the factory oil - but only as a lubricant, however it's missing some of the ingredients that the later model transmissions require, and thus may cause you some grief.

I have also seen tranny's starting to leak, due to missing/different seal conditioners in some A/T fluids, and once replaced with factory oil, leaks stop.

After 2 tranny's I'm a belier! Engine oil, and Manual Transmission oil I WOULD recommend to replace with Synthetic and do so my self for many years now.
 

Last edited by the_tow_guy; 03-25-09 at 04:37 AM. Reason: Not necessary to quote entire original post; please use the "Reply" button.
  #7  
Old 03-25-09, 12:58 PM
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Use a fluid that meets your manufacturers minimum fluid requirements and you won't have a problem. Look in your owners manual for you car and you should see a spec for the fluid. If that spec is on the synthetic fluid you want to use you don't need to work about anything. For instance, most current GM vehicles use the DEXRON VI ATF. If the replacement synthetic fluid says it meets GM (Spec Number) for DEXRON VI fluid you can use it and be assured that it has all the additives and friction qualities that GM engineers wanted.
 
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