front rotor removal

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  #1  
Old 07-07-09, 01:00 AM
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front rotor removal

96 Nissan Sentra front rotors.

When I picked up the parts at O'ril I was told that I had to take off the cotter pin, wheel bearing etc...and needed a special tool.

Bought a Chilton and also looked on AutoZos site and it looks like the parts guy was looking at the wrong vehicle year. They both show that you can use two bolts to screw into two holes to get the rotor off. But No Bolt Holes in old or on the new rotors.

I gave a few whacks with a hand sledge and no luck. Ran out of time and had to quit. Will try whacking the other side tomorrow (today)...GF's daughter torched the rotor on the side I was working on.

I googled a few things, but not much luck. Wanted to make sure that I do not have to take wheel bearings etc off. That way I can whack it much harder.

Thanks tons
 
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  #2  
Old 07-07-09, 04:54 AM
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They're likely rusted up around the center hub; a good soaking with some penetrating oil may help. I'm really surprised the threaded holes aren't present. You may need to use a puller.
 
  #3  
Old 07-07-09, 03:54 PM
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96 was a Split year.... You may possibly have "Trappped" Rotors.. In which case, the bearings must be pressed out, the rotor unbolted from the hub, replaced, and the bearings pressed back in. (Hence The special Tool That was mentioned).
 
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Old 07-08-09, 01:09 AM
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Thank the stars the info from the parts guy was wrong! [He did glance at the wrong year] I used the penetrating fluid and the hand sledge on the "good side" first and it came off. It took quit a bit on the toasted side. No one can answer why no bolt holes on the rotor. I don't think I have ever worked on one that has had them.

When I got the good side off I noticed some spring type clips that were missing on the bad side so I went back to the parts store and bought the kit for it..glad they had it.

Was a mess trying to put the above and below clips on, then the pads. [not the spring clips that go on after] I finally took off the whole mess and put the clips and pads on first, then bolted the whole assembly back on.

All was looking good until I tried to push back the piston on the bad side!! arrrrrrgh! Another trip to the parts store for a new caliper. That is a lesson learned!!!!!!! If you have a toasted rotor check your caliper before the end of the job. That might be something to do all the time....maybe a few pros will chip in on that.

All was done except for the bleeding and my vacuum thing is shot so I needed a helper and it was late at night. BUT my son shows up and as we head out...Strong Rain!...Wind! ... Hail (small) and all is lost.....having your garage burn down is not a good thing.

Oh yeah, while peaking around underneath this thing I noticed two of the three exhaust bolts are broken [from the exhaust pipe to the manifold]

Did I say this is my GF's daughters car? She had to be deaf to not hear this WW III noise coming from this car!

It's been keystone time for a few hours now! Beer 4U2 ....
... hope this makes sense ... will check in the morning
 
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Old 07-08-09, 03:28 AM
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Frozen calipers and and bleed screws, On brake inspections (Before I retired from auto) we always checked to see if bleeds would open and pistons would push in.
 
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Old 07-09-09, 12:10 AM
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Thanks everyone for the info!

Have a new question for same car. I have a lot of air after trying to bleed the wheel with the new caliper (right front). Going to bleed all ... needs new fluid anyway.

I have always bled from the farthest away first etc. The Chilton says on 1994-96 vehicles to do..
1. right rear
2. left front
3. left rear
4. right front

any sense in that? Course this manual also says a couple steps further down to have a helper pump several times until free of bubbles and then on last pumping stroke hold pedal down and tighten bleeder. Uh how about sucking air back in!
 
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Old 07-09-09, 02:27 PM
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If you hold pedal down it will not suck air in. You may have a X type system. LF & RR RF & LR
 
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Old 07-09-09, 02:33 PM
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Normally its pump several times to build pressure..then open and close bleeder as pedal drops. That's what I used to do anyway. Though I imagine it will suck from the reservoir before it pull back up the line. Also, unless a new master, put a block of wood to prevent pedal from going to floor.

And yeah, you may have a cross linked system..where the opposite front and rear are connected to increase stability in the event of loss of one circuit.
 
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Old 07-09-09, 02:59 PM
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Thanks guys!

I had totally forgotten the X type system, it's been a while since I have seen one of those.

This Chilton actually says to have the helper pump up and down with the bleeder open.

IT says:

Starting with the first point in the bleeding sequence, connect a clear hose over the bleeder screw. Submerge the other end of the hole in clean brake fluid in a clear glass container. Make sure the clear hose in below the brake fluid level.

Open the bleeder valve, while a helper slowly pumps the brake pedal. Pump the pedal several times (in long strokes) until fluid free of bubbles is discharged.

On the last pumping stroke, hold the pedal down and tighten the bleeder screw. Check the fluid level periodically during the bleeding operation.


All that is word for word, even the mistakes as in hole instead of hose etc. I don't see how that can work unless the hose would be full of fluid when you started?

I read a bunch last night on the site on bleeding and I learned the pump up the pressure first idea and that makes a lot of sense. I have always done one down and close, back up, repeat. So the pressure pumped up ahead should make it a bunch faster.
 
  #10  
Old 07-09-09, 04:31 PM
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I don't see how that can work unless the hose would be full of fluid when you started?
I always thought the hose & jar procedure was when you had no helper to pump the pedal.


Anyway, when you depress the pedal the hose will fill with fluid and the air bubbles will float to the top of the jar. When you release the pedal it just sucks up pure fluid and you're set.

Main thing is keep an eye on the fluid level in the master cylinder.....don't want it to get low and suck air. Works great if you can get the bleeders loose.


Baldwin
 
  #11  
Old 07-09-09, 06:35 PM
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Really simple......

Crack all of the bleeders open, take the cap off of the M/C, sit back and have a smoke, and wait for them to start dripping....As they drip, close the bleeders one at a time, and youre done..... Top off the M/C and go for a ride.
 
  #12  
Old 07-09-09, 11:52 PM
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Thanks a ton to everyone!

I found a very small leak where the brake line bolts to the new caliper. Took it apart and cleaned it well and re-torqued it ... just a bit past the proper setting No more leak.

Was a bit scared to open all bleeders so I re bled just the one using the pump the pedal pressure up first instead of my old one pump way. It was a lot faster and everything is done

Thanks again to all!

If one did the gravity bleed wouldn't that get brake fluid all over the brakes? Or would you need to put a hose on each one? Or is brake fluid not a big deal on the brakes?
 
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Old 07-10-09, 03:13 AM
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just drips down the calipers or outside the backing plate. Used to do it a lot when was doing brakes, just open bleed screw and than go do the other side while it's dripping Just have to remember to check fluid so it doesn't go empty. While you are doing brake job you also are flushing system with new fluid.
 
  #14  
Old 07-10-09, 11:49 PM
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Thanks

And thanks again to all
 
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