1996 Corvette CHECK ENGINE OIL

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  #1  
Old 08-05-09, 05:04 AM
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1996 Corvette CHECK ENGINE OIL

Looking at a used 96 Vette for sale, Check Engine Oil light stays on the dash. Owner said oil fluid is good, oil changed in April, few miles driven since then. Any idea what causes this?
 
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Old 08-05-09, 06:30 AM
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doesn't gm cars go by useful oil life left?
 
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Old 08-05-09, 08:11 AM
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I have a 2005 Yukon and it does give usefull oil life, not sure when GM started this. I am not sure if this just needs to be reset and the dash light will go out. My concern is if there could be a bigger problem, which I am trying to get someone to give me some incite.
 
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Old 08-05-09, 10:42 AM
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Check engine oil

Not sure if Check Engine Oil is the same as the Change Engine Oil light which is part of the GM OLS (Oil Life System). Two different idio lights I would think. Is there an oil pressure sensor switch gone bad? Could be a true oil pressure problem also I would guess?
 
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Old 08-05-09, 10:59 AM
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http://www.extendedgmwarranty.com/ow...t-Corvette.pdf

Owners manual....large file...but all the gauges and lights are in the last 10 pages of section 2. No mention of a Check Oil light, but it does tell you how to reset the Change Oil light...if thats what was meant. They were using the oil life monitors on the 96 Vette apparently.
 
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Old 08-05-09, 12:47 PM
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I do know that earlier GM models used a basic mileage and time system to send off their oil lights. Usually 5000 or 7000 miles with a basic 3 month clock time. Later they implemented their patented OLS system which uses more operational driving data tied in with computer developments as they added several on board computers. I also would reset the mileage/time clock and see if the light goes off. It all could be a non issue for you other than needing a routine oil change. BTW for other readers of this blog GM did alot of accurate and documented studies on their OLS system and found that the 3000 mile oil change myth after carburators moved to computers and fuel injection and lower tech oils became higher tech was more about oil company profits than about what what their lab studies showed regarding oil analysis and change intervals traditionally dictated. For the record some of their studies looked at oil that the computers finally signalled as an oil change after as long as 15000 miles, and found that the oil was still not considered below acceptable lubrication standards. Check out the web info. They in fact calculated that 100 million gallons a year could be saved if their customers only followed the computer rather than what the quick change oil places talk about. That is 100 million gallons not need from some place wear the oil company execs live in tents for example. Also the same applies to other fluids such as GM brake fluid that many corporate driven places seem to push for flushing after 3 or 4 years. These changes are not required from GM. At some point they improved their fluid and brake hose composites to the point that they considered brake fluid as life time fill based on all their analysis. You won't see brake fluid change for example in any regular GM maintenance book in the past several years but it always exists in every fast change service outlet. GM coolant is still designed for 5 years of service and 150,000 miles regardless of what some could call severe service because you might live in warmer climates. Dealers may not always tell you that either. Why would they? They need the revenue. Dealers and others needed to find ways to get around the 100,000 miles spark plugs for example. They all lost the revenue around losing the famous historical word 'tune up' that some of did every few thousand miles in the past. Many dealers have invented service recommendations outside of what GM ever required. Sad but very true everyone. The only severe service notes are around transmission fluid, and even that is defined in vague and confusing terms that goes way beyond taxi cabs driven in stop and go, and cop cars. I recently had this debat at a Goodyear Gemini Center. I sooned realized what was really going on. They need to sell their products to survive folks. All fluids do need changing at some point, and yes changing every several years can't hurt, but technology has changed faster than information to owners. Who ever heard of front brakes lasting 150,000 miles? Since ceramic pads were dveloped any service outlet will tell you if they are honest that at least on GM products they often see it now on the GM trucks for example. How many reading this blog ever heard this before. Well it's all true folks.
 
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Old 08-05-09, 04:40 PM
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Vette Engines and durabilty

One more point about lubrication in Corvette engines. I do know that for example in Europe that when they started trying to sell Vettes in some volume in Germany for Auto Bahn driving which again GM failed at, for example the entire oil lubrication system was inadequate. The engines were not designed for contiuous high speed performance and they had to increase the oil passage sizes later at least on some blocks to deal with it. They really had only been designed in the U.S. for quick and short green light burnouts back home. Many Vettes lost their motors in Europe at some point due to thiis. Again this is all true and I for one know because I spent 5 years living in Europe and working for the former GM/Opel there as an Exec. The funny thing for me was that even the Opel 2.0 liter engines could run all day at speeds of up to 130 mph and not blow apart. 2.0 liter engines in Europe could actualy go that fast with the right gearing , and while it took longer than what everyone would like in our country, they could hit that speed on the flat stretches. That is pretty much as fast as the old Plymouth Road Runners that I also drove in the long ago past could hit. I would know about Europe because I drove them that way on the German Auto Bahns for several years. The small Opel engines were every bit as good as anything from BMW, and Mercedes for example. For those that don't know, and only remember Opel selling their little 2 door coupe in the U.S. years ago, Opel is a big player still in Europe and at one point had almost as much market share as Volkswagen, and still has a product line up similar in everyway to some of the best and well known foreign makers sold in our country. They compete against the best and I hope with the GM bankruptcy they don't get sold off to the Russians. It's too bad that when they brought the Opel Astra to our country under the Saturn badge last year they forgot to tell anybody. These are wonderful cars in everyway way regarding handling and great braking and fuel economy. I am not selling them. I left GM in 2005 but I do know what I know.
 
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