Green brake fluid??

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-11-10, 08:46 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Owen Sound Ontario Canada
Posts: 541
Green brake fluid??

2000 Chrysler Town and Country leaks light green fluid out from around proportioning valve in rear.
I cant tell if it is from a line or the valve itself.
I am near sure it is from valve in a tight spot between frame and valve where salt and moisture just sat there.
I plan to order one and check it out.
It looks to be aluminum.

My question is, has anybody seen green brake fluid. we ran over a liter of fresh brake fluid thru the master to get home and try to pinpoint the leak.

I am thinking it is a product of the aluminum corroding.
Anybody seen this before?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-11-10, 12:48 PM
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Washington State
Posts: 312
Yep it means moisture in the brake system full brake flush after you repair the leak is strongly reccommended.
 
  #3  
Old 01-11-10, 04:43 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Owen Sound Ontario Canada
Posts: 541
Thanks Maniac M
Now would you flush with fresh brake fluid or use a flushing agent?
 
  #4  
Old 01-11-10, 06:29 PM
the_tow_guy's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: SW Fla USA
Posts: 11,517
Don't know about Maniac, but I would just use plenty of fresh fluid.
 
  #5  
Old 01-11-10, 08:23 PM
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Washington State
Posts: 312
For the DIY'r Fresh fluid. I would suck the res down as far as possible and refill. Then bleed the system till it runs clear at all 4 corners. I have the luxery or haveing a nitrogen system to do this faster but that mach costs too much for a diy'r at home. Good Luck (ps can't spell tonight long rough day in the shop) LOL
 
  #6  
Old 01-12-10, 07:16 AM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Kingsport, TN
Posts: 217
When bleeding brakes, begin at the wheel that is most distant from the master cylinder. That would be the passenger rear. Driver rear would be second. Passenger front is third while driver front is last.

I operate a track car so bleeding is necessary every month or so. Fresh fluid is what to use for bleeding. I first remove all that is in the master cylinder reservoir, then refill with fresh fluid. That way you are not pushing moisture laden fluid back into your system.

I prefer applying pressure at the master cylinder via an air compressor with the pressure turned down to about 10 psig. but a vacuum gadget at the wheel works ok although I once had a Mercedes with ABS that could not be bled at the wheel with a vacuum pump.

I don't care for the pedal pumping method and the reason is that you are forcing the plunger past the position where it normally travels when you drive. Crud builds up inside the cylinder (where piston does not normally travel) so shoving the piston past the crud can damage the piston seals.

I have never seen green brake fluid but I have not seen them all. Some of the racing brands have a blue and a yellow which makes bleeding easier as there is a distinct color change when the fresh fluid arrives at the bleed point. Have to wonder if the green color is some sort of corrosion product.
 
  #7  
Old 01-12-10, 12:23 PM
the_tow_guy's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: SW Fla USA
Posts: 11,517
I don't think I've ever seen green either, so I was trusting the real mechanic.
 
  #8  
Old 01-13-10, 09:25 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Livonia, Michigan
Posts: 923
Green could indicate copper corrosion. There is a lot of copper in the system, including the brake lines. Though brake lines look like steel, they are made from bundy tubing, which means there is braze in the tubing body.

Or it could be a mix of blue and yellow brake fluid. Somebody may have mixed some leftover fluids.

Or it could be general contamination from seal wear. Darkened yellow fluid may look green.
 
  #9  
Old 01-13-10, 07:35 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Owen Sound Ontario Canada
Posts: 541
Kestas
I did some internet reading on the copper lines.
Yes the green is not the first time it has happened.
Its a corrosion problem.
I am sure I am going to break a line getting the old valve off so I will examine the line inside.
Might be time for all new lines.
Thanks for the info
 
  #10  
Old 01-14-10, 03:35 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,039
Drown any fittings ahead of time with WD-40. It can be difficult to remove any old brake line without damaging it.
 
  #11  
Old 01-14-10, 03:45 AM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Kingsport, TN
Posts: 217
You might also consider getting a set of box end wrenches with the little split in them as opposed to using a standard set of open end wrenches that have a good chance of rounding off the fittings. Like the previous poster indicated, they can be quite difficult to loosen.
 
  #12  
Old 01-14-10, 04:13 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,039
"set of box end wrenches with the little split"

they are called 'line wrenches'
 
  #13  
Old 01-14-10, 08:46 AM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Northern Minnesota
Posts: 1,452
One thing I've found for working on rusted brake lines and bleeders is a 6 or 8 inch pipe wrench. When they start to round off, and they will, this usually takes it right off.
===========================================

Something from another forum about penetrating fluid:

Penetrating Oils Compared

Machinist's Workshop magazine actually tested penetrants for break out torque on rusted nuts. Significant results!

*They arranged a subjective test of all the popular penetrants with the control being the torque required to remove the nut from a "scientifically rusted" environment.*

*Penetrating oil ..... Average load*

None ..................... 516 pounds
WD-40 ............. 238 pounds
PB Blaster ............. 214 pounds
Liquid Wrench .. 127 pounds
Kano Kroil ............ 106 pounds
ATF-Acetone mix....53 pounds

*The ATF-Acetone mix was a "home brew" mix of 50 - 50 automatic transmission fluid and acetone*
*Note the "home brew" was better than any commercial product in this one particular test. A local machinist group mixed up a batch and all now use it with equally good results. Note also that "Liquid Wrench" is about as good as "Kroil" for about 20% of the price.*
 
  #14  
Old 01-23-10, 04:53 PM
Speedwrench's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 1,698
marksr, they are called flare nut wrenches-lol
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'