Frame Damage

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  #1  
Old 02-07-10, 05:49 AM
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Frame Damage

I have some front end frame damage to a 2007 Chrysler 300 Touring. The better half turned left before the median ran out and took out a rim and pushed up the frame at the spot where on of the screws that holds up the splash pan that protects the oil pan etc (4 small bolts ) goes into a small clip. I had to have the car aligned, but my shop said I was risking a re alignment by playing with this frame. I change my own oil, and every time I have to change it, this pan has to come off, If I can find a long enough screw. (I am working on what thread type it is already) I can just put in a spacer and live with that until she screws up the alignment again. My question is how would a frame shop do this right? The frame is not twisted or bashed in from the front. It just has a dent in it from the bottom up. (about 3 inches long, 1 inch wide, and about an inch deep) I've pulled dents out worse than this, but never did it on a frame. I know if I heat it up and start pulling on it, it is going to change things, but this dent is a long way from any connections to the drive train supports. Anybody ever done this?
 
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  #2  
Old 02-07-10, 07:26 AM
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Yes, I have done this kind of work but only on older 4x4 pick up trucks.
I wouldn't in the slightest consider doing what you propose on this type of vehicle.

Make up a spacer and just live with it.
Driving lessons might help as well.
 
  #3  
Old 02-07-10, 08:04 AM
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Further to the last post, you have a 3 year old car that likely has many years of life left in it. Why not see if you can negotiate a fair price from a good body shop and see what 2 or 3 hours of professional labor might get you if they will take it on? Keeping the integrity and factory tolerances of the entire BIF structure in my opinion is worth this approach. It has worked for me in the past. If it's too expensive for your budget, and you can't make this work for you at least you know the tradeoffs.
 
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Old 02-10-10, 01:28 AM
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heard the dry ice method? supposed to be used on car panels. the theory is that you place a small piece of dry ice directly onto a small dent. The metal in contact with the dry ice contracts which causes it to pull back in place.
 
  #5  
Old 02-10-10, 09:15 AM
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This is a preferred and common method to correct hail damage for sure. Usually dry ice on a warm panel works wonders for small dings that have not creased the metal, especially on the stamped out 'A' surfaces like hoods, decklids and roofs with fairly light guage material. Lots of video clips on this technique available online also, but frame structural components are something different entirely that really need professional attention.
 
  #6  
Old 02-10-10, 02:56 PM
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Frame Damage

I knew when I saw it that it wasn't going to be easy to fix this right. I found a metric bolt long enough to hold the new splash pan in place and reach the spacer that is a Liiiiitle higher on the frame than it was originally. A little bondo, rustoleum black, and I will be the only one who will know. I will keep the car until althemers sets in, and then I wont even know why I have 3 one inch bolts and one two inchbolt to hold that pan there when I change the oil....
 
  #7  
Old 02-11-10, 11:02 AM
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frame damage

You could cut out the damaged area and weld in a patch with the fastener in it.

That dry ice thing sure wouldn't work on my hail damage.
 
  #8  
Old 02-11-10, 06:04 PM
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Frame Damage

I will wait until the weather warms up so I can get a better look at just what I have to do without ice water dripping on my face. I won't risk the integrity of the frame regardless. I can handle a welder, (I own three different ones) but I would only trust this job from the look of it with a certified guy. I wouldn't want the moderators to have a heart attack...
 
  #9  
Old 02-14-10, 01:26 PM
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Would it be possible for you to post a few pictures of the damage from several angles, it may be little more than cosmetic or it could be more serious depending on location and severity.
Bill
 
  #10  
Old 02-14-10, 03:15 PM
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Frame Damage

I would be happy to take a few photos. Where would you like me to send them?
 
  #11  
Old 02-14-10, 03:34 PM
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You can post them on a free photo sharing site like Photo Bucket and provide a link.
You can also use the above button that looks like a mountain to have the picture on Photo Bucket appear in a post.
 
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Old 02-15-10, 07:23 AM
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