fuel filter 1996 subaru legacy 2.2

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  #1  
Old 02-06-11, 10:35 AM
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fuel filter 1996 subaru legacy 2.2

I want to change fuel filters on my 1996 subaru legacy 2.2 the vehicle starts fine runs and then shuts off. I used an octane booster..still stalls out. My question... is there a release valve of sorts to release preasure in system? If so where is this located.Will I get sprayed with gas upon initional disconnect? Should the fuel pump fuse be pulled to prevent pump from running while change over? Thank you in advance for help.
 
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Old 02-06-11, 11:12 AM
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Most vehicles have some rubber sections in their fuel lines. These expand slightly under pressure so expect some fuel to exit when you loosen a fitting. Fuel injected vehicles retain their pressure for quite some time when shut off. What I always do is put a rag under the fitting then barely crack it. I've never had a car with a fuel pressure release.
If, indeed, it is not getting fuel, just run the engine until it stalls. This will relieve much of th fuel pressure.

If you are using a trouble light, remove it from the immediate area before you open any lines. Fuel pump will not run with ignition off but if it makes you feel better, pull the fuse or relay that controls it. I never pull the fuse but I have a battery disconnect in the vehicle that is the one that usually gets tampered with.
 
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Old 02-06-11, 11:17 AM
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One final thought: I don't know how a Subaru's fuel filter is connected but I can tell you that on German cars, brass fittings are used. They tend to break loose suddenly and are put on quite tightly. So to keep from bashing knuckles/elbows when one suddenly breaks loose I place two wrenches at maybe a 15 degree angle. Then merely squeeze the wrenches together. When the fitting suddenly lts go, your hands just close. Your elbows/knuckles won't get smashed on something nearby.
 
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Old 02-06-11, 11:28 AM
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You can relieve fuel pressure on this vehicle prior to opening up the fuel line if you would prefer this to avoid gas spray by following the below method.

Remove the rear seat cushion and seat back, then the floor mat and access hole lid.
Disconnect the fuel pump relay electrical connector.
Start the engine and operate until it stalls.
After the engine has stalled, crank the engine for at least 5 seconds.
Place the ignition switch in Off position.
Disconnect the battery ground cable.
Connect the fuel pump electrical connector.
 
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Old 02-07-11, 07:40 PM
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yeaahhh.... bashed will be I, but i have replaced many fuel filters and have never relieved no pressure and never was sprayed with gas. drank some, yes, had some in my eye because was stupid enough to stick my face right under the filter, otherwise....

it's Asian make, so filter will have banjo bolts on fuel lines. Those are pita, they are shallow heads and take a ton of torque to remove. so much torque that filter rotates in the bracket. so, do not loosen bracket and even have channel locks handy to hold filter in place. means - helper. of course, impact wrench takes care of this right away, he-he...

btw, if it starts and cuts off right away, i see new fuel pump coming. so, do this: pull rear seat out, locate fuel pump, and check all connections, esp ground, for corrosion or loose contact.

is there a security system installed somewhere?

back again to many filters replaced. i have never ever seen one that was plugged. never. maybe with gazillion miles on it. not even in 200 000 miles.
 
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Old 02-08-11, 07:45 AM
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"yeaahhh.... bashed will be I, but i have replaced many fuel filters and have never relieved no pressure and never was sprayed with gas."

Well, I certainly have noticed a little spurting. Try opening the line at the fuel rail on a Porsche 951. There are two rubber lines that come out just below the shock tower and go to the rail. You get a spurt when you crack the big fitting. This could be due to softening of rubber fuel lines so they are slightly elastic. They suddenly contract when the pressure is released. Volume reduction must go somewhere so you get a spurt.

European banjo bolts work rather nicely. I've opened many on German vehicles and on one Italian vehicle. Can't say anything about Asian banjos. Maybe the music is not as sweet. They use a larger pitch on the threads which would make them more difficult to work with. I know the pitch on the oil drain plug on my Acura is greater than on the European cars I own.
 
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Old 02-08-11, 02:57 PM
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oh yeah, there's always some spurt. but not a geyser. unless you really stick face into it.

worst thing i have seen with those was gas getting in my friend's ear. he went through agonizing pain for about 20 minutes. wasn't even drunk more than usual.

yes, high pitch has higher torque requirement due to pitch angle; lower pitch/"thinner" thread strips faster though. and they always have to have one or 2 of those bolts somewhere in a real tight space...
 
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