most "do-it-yourselfer" friendly car model?


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Old 02-24-11, 09:15 PM
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most "do-it-yourselfer" friendly car model?

I think the transmission on my current car is pretty much gone, and I know relatively very little on the best car brands and models, so I would like some advice on what are some of the more do-it-yourselfer friendly cars out there. Which ones do not use proprietary and lockout technologies so that normal mechanics (instead of having to take it directly to the dealership anytime something breaks) can work on them and have replaceable parts? Which ones are the most reliable?
I am probably going to get a used car, maybe no more than 10 years old though, so something that is on the used car market?
 
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Old 02-24-11, 09:29 PM
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Which ones do not use proprietary and lockout technologies so that normal mechanics (instead of having to take it directly to the dealership anytime something breaks) can work on them and have replaceable parts?
None unless you want to get pre K car.

Nissan 4 cyl. has timing chain. 100,000 mile tune up. 28 MPG

GM best motor made 2.2 ecotec. 4 cyl. ( Beats my V8) Look it up to see what vehicles.(not many)
Olds Alero, Satun Vue..Etc. Has timing chain. 32 MPG

Mike NJ
 
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Old 02-25-11, 03:53 AM
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I know Saturn is out of business, but I agree with Mike. I did a lot of research before buying one. Stainless steel timing chain, stainless steel exhaust system, integral roll bar built right in to the roof system, polymer side panels that bounce back if they get hit with a grocery cart. You could probably get a good deal on one. I had the L300, which is higher end, with more bells and whistles, and would still have it if wifey hadn't decided to total it. Nowadays it doesn't take much to total a car. Pick up she hit was about a 1980's version and only scratched the bumper!!
I did build a downhill racer once that was diy freindly Long time ago.
 
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Old 02-25-11, 08:15 AM
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Originally Posted by illumilore View Post
I think the transmission on my current car is pretty much gone, and I know relatively very little on the best car brands and models, so I would like some advice on what are some of the more do-it-yourselfer friendly cars out there. Which ones do not use proprietary and lockout technologies so that normal mechanics (instead of having to take it directly to the dealership anytime something breaks) can work on them and have replaceable parts? Which ones are the most reliable?
I am probably going to get a used car, maybe no more than 10 years old though, so something that is on the used car market?
You "think" the transmission is "pretty much gone". That is a very vague comment to make for someone who wants to DIY'er.
What do you mean by LOCKOUT technologies?
What make/year/model do you have now? You may have a keeper and don't know it.....
 
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Old 02-25-11, 01:24 PM
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no saab or volvo
no european makes
not really any domestics
not really koreans, unless you do not mind using that 100 000 miles warranty more often than you wish
btw, GM announced same warranty on some models
not really a toyota, as quality plummeted
not really most of japanese either, as they are made in the USA/Canada/Mexico mostly now...

i can tell you what you want. it's bulletproof advice.

95-96 Honda Civic VTEC engine. manual transmission. yes, does have timing belt that is recommended to be done every 70K miles, but with a little hassle, it's done in about 2 hrs. ridiculously reliable cars. manual does around 40-45mpg. parts are everywhere and in cheap abundance. THEY WERE STILL MADE IN JAPAN UNDER OLD STANDARDS.

yes, around same year nissans. i just don't like nissans. have no idea why. but they are known reliable cars.

now, if you want something that is VERY EASY to work on, you either have to get a pickup, or go back in time into 70s and 80s, when there was enough room inside engine bay to walk around engine. 2 vacuum lines, 2 sensors, no overly too smart computers.. not really a gas mileage either...
 
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Old 02-25-11, 01:48 PM
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How about and old 1960's French Citroen 2CV (2 hp?). The seats look like aluminum lawn chairs with nylon wedding and the high/low beams were adjusted bu a rod that you pushed. It you want a convertible (sort of), you just slid back the fabric top and still had some support. - The trouble is they can be very costly because of collectors.

Now that is simple for operation and repairs. It is not nearly as sophisticated as the big Citroens with adjustable ride height and oil/air adjustable shocks, etc, but shot lived engines.
 
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Old 02-25-11, 05:05 PM
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Originally Posted by 2granddaughters View Post
You "think" the transmission is "pretty much gone". That is a very vague comment to make for someone who wants to DIY'er.
What do you mean by LOCKOUT technologies?
What make/year/model do you have now? You may have a keeper and don't know it.....
I didn't mention the what specifically was wrong with it because I have already decided to replace it. It has already had the transmission rebuilt not too long ago, and it also needed to have computer replaced as well. I just don' think it is worth keeping.
The problem with it is that the transmission slips going in reverse, and has been progressively getting worse.
By lockout tech, I mean cars that use proprietary and patented parts that are available only from the dealer or manufacturer. My current ford car does that, and it makes repairs a lot harder, or if I have to replace something, more expensive than it needs to be.
 
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Old 02-25-11, 07:00 PM
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oh, so it's a ford...

why i'm not surprised... i had two, was two too many. the only fords you can safely buy are re-badged Mazda, like ranger, escort, or escape.

seriously, save some cash and go for craigslist adventure. donno if you have any major educational institutions where you at, here in Seattle the harvest time is towards late June. international students that bought Hondas, have their student visas expired, and must leave the country. that's when you buy! you can get 94-95 "can't kill" Civic for 2 grand easy. of course unless you want ti BIG, so then yeah, domestic it is, have fun.

btw, VW Bug, the old classic one, is about the easiest to work on. alternator belt change is 5 seconds. strong guy can pull engine out by himself. just pick it up and carry out. light.

YouTube - The Original Fast Volkswagen Belt Change.
YouTube - VW Beetle Engine change Guiness world record
YouTube - WATCH THIS: only 4 bolts to take out a vw beetle's engine!
 
 

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