Battery replacement question 2006 Civic

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  #1  
Old 02-26-11, 10:42 PM
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Battery replacement question 2006 Civic

Are there any precautions when replacing the battery? I understand that I may need to reset the radio's code if I disconnect the battery cables. Are there other things to reset after replacing the battery?

It would be nice to replace the battery and everything works just fine without having to reset anything.
 
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  #2  
Old 02-27-11, 09:59 AM
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1. yes, you will have to reset security code. make sure you have it handy.
2. negative goes off first. if you have a general power fuse in the fuse box, old Hondas used to have that, pull it out first. disconnects EVERYTHING from the battery. so no spark.
3. buy dielectric grease, battery terminal sealant spray, and battery cleaning tool. before installing new battery, CLEAN cable terminals well. lubricate battery poles WELL with dielectric grease. make sure that cable terminals are ALL THE WAY DOWN to the battery surface. lock them in place and spray over with sealnt. be happy. that battery will easy last 5-6 yrs and serve you well. occasionally re-spray sealnt onto the terminals.
 
  #3  
Old 02-27-11, 10:30 AM
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Well...you can also buy the memory savers that you plug into a lighter or aux power outlet (key may need to be in aux or ign position unless plug has constant power with key off). I made one with an old plug and some alligator clips and a 9V battery. Provides enough juice to keep radio presets and computer memory.

Remove hold down and make sure battery can be easily removed. Loosen clamps (with key off)...plug in memory saver...turn on key (if needed)... remove clamps...remove battery...clean clamps...install new battery...tighten clamps..turn off key...remove memory saver.

It's worked fine for my Tribute and Suzuki...easier than reprogramming since I already had the saver made from a while back.

You don't want to leave the memory saver connected when the battery is connected....it will get a little warm from the higher voltage being supplied..but if you follow the listed steps I never worry about it
 
  #4  
Old 02-27-11, 10:34 AM
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Dielectric grease is an insulator. There is not good reason to place it between surfaces that are meant to pass electricity. Electrical conductors should not be coated with dielectric grease prior to being mated. Instead, I would place it on the outside of battery terminal to help keep moisture out.

Another good use for dielectric grease is on spark plug insulators for easier removal when comes time to change the plugs. It is also good for smearing on rubber seals on electrical connectors but it is not for placement on the mating electrical contact surfaces.
 
  #5  
Old 02-27-11, 10:44 AM
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Some lighter sockets are shut off when the key is shut off. Mercedes work this way, at least through 2002 which is the latest one I have. My later model Acura does not.

I've been able to juggle the batteries with jumper cables attached in such a way that a battery remains attached during the swap. But I'm not sure I'd recommend it. But with prior planning and care, it can be done.
 
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Old 02-27-11, 10:53 AM
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Yeah Lawrence...I thought about using my portable jump start thingy, but the current available can cause more arcing (and spot welds...lol) than I wanted to chance.
 
  #7  
Old 02-27-11, 03:28 PM
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Originally Posted by LawrenceC View Post
Dielectric grease is an insulator. There is not good reason to place it between surfaces that are meant to pass electricity. Electrical conductors should not be coated with dielectric grease prior to being mated. Instead, I would place it on the outside of battery terminal to help keep moisture out.

Another good use for dielectric grease is on spark plug insulators for easier removal when comes time to change the plugs. It is also good for smearing on rubber seals on electrical connectors but it is not for placement on the mating electrical contact surfaces.
Lawrence, been using CRC di-electric grease FOR YEARS. don't even try that route, please. first thing i do when i buy a used car, or even a new one, i locate as many electrical plugs as i can, unplug them, and pack with that grease. YEARS, Lawrence. MANY cars.

Product Description
Non-curing silicone compound used for electrical sealing, lubricating, protecting and insulating. Waterproofs electrical connections and components. Improves electrical performance in adverse weather conditions.

Product Specifications Open
Applications Electrical panels, outdoor lighting, scoreboards, traffic lights, high voltage poles, transformers, disconnects, switching mechanisms, electrical contacts, spark plugs, battery terminals, fasteners, o-rings, rubber and plastic parts.

Applications include: light bulb sockets,
lamps, electrical connections, headlights/
taillights, battery terminals, spark plug boots,
trailer connectors, wire connectors, switches,
fuses, circuit breakers, and much more!

http://www.crcindustries.com/files/D...ll%20Sheet.pdf

what do you think, THEY don't know what they are talking about? asking for lawsuit?

you ever opened a plug? saw that little bit of grease manufacturer put in? what do you think it is?

sorry, i raised voice, due respect, but as much as i have it packed all over many cars through years, i must have head a salvage yard full of electrically dead vehicles in my property by now. somehow, they run, and run real well.

oh, and to your point. here's a cute "science vs practical experience" discussion; please, see how "pundits" say "oh, no you can't do it" and end users say "my WHALER is running with no electrical problems ever since i started applying it DIRECTLY to all kinds of electrical contacts."

Dielectric Grease - Moderated Discussion Areas
 
  #8  
Old 02-28-11, 03:59 AM
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All I can say is that you have been in error for many years. The use of it is to keep moisture and contaminants out of electrical connections. You should not put it on the contacts themselves. It adds resistance to the connection, period.

Here's a quote:
"Dielectric grease is a nonconductive grease. Because it is nonconductive it does not enhance the flow electrical current. Electrical conductors should not be coated with dielectric grease prior to being mated. However, dielectric grease is often applied to electrical connectors, particularly ones which contain rubber gaskets, as a way to provide a nonconductive lubricant and sealer for the rubber portions of the connector.
The widest use of dielectric grease is in high-voltage connections associated with spark plugs. The grease is applied to the rubber boot of the plug wire. This helps the rubber boot slide onto the ceramic insulator of the plug. The grease also acts to seal the rubber boot, while at the same time preventing the rubber from becoming stuck to the ceramic. Generally spark plugs are in located in areas of high temperature, and the grease is formulated to withstand the temperature range expected.

Another common use of dielectric grease is on the rubber mating surfaces or gaskets of multi-pin electrical connectors used in automotive and marine engines. The grease again acts as a lubricant and a sealant on the nonconductive mating surfaces of the connector. It is not recommended to be applied to the actual electrical conductive contacts of the connector."

Coating electrical connectors does not enhance the connection. You are adding resistance to it by doing so. Men have been beating wives for years. Does that make it right....
 
  #9  
Old 03-02-11, 11:07 AM
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I have checked with an electrical engineer. Here is what he said. It sounds like you can coat if you wish. So, Ukrbyk, you are not wrong. And by the last part of the included note, you might be more correct than I. You are saluted!

"I read an article in an IEEE engineering journal years go (20+?) where this was analyzed way beyond the scope of any work I did for Kodak. I believe the study was conducted by AMP.

Generally their finding was that providing you had an appropriate connector that produced both a good electrical and mechanical bond, there was no appreciable difference in the voltage, amperage or waveform through the connection regardless of when the dielectric was introduced to the junction.

However, in a durability exercise with high frequency and high voltage, it was found that connections coated before assembly showed less signs of interface surface oxidation and thus less degradation of pass through with time. Their conclusion was that by coating before assembly even minute or microscopic oxidation points were eliminated or mitigated at the juncture point.

FWIW, since reading that I've always coated before assembly.

I'm truly amazed at the erroneous statements about dielectric compounds...
so many people actually believe it is conductive and HELPS the voltage flow.
Here was a really bad example I found a couple of years ago. You don't need to watch more than 10 seconds."

YouTube - Dielectric Grease Review - etrailer.com
 
  #10  
Old 03-02-11, 12:08 PM
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Well...I didn't weigh in..but I use a light smear of dielectric grease on all my screw in lightbulbs. Makes them much easier to remove. We used to use both a grease and a spray, on connectors for all our exterior antenna connectors and such back in the Navy.

I also do a light coating on car batteries before putting the clamps on.

As long as there is a wiping or threaded connection, I don't think there is any issue.
 
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