1994 Honda Civic - won't start - am learning - starter fluid spray?

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  #1  
Old 05-02-11, 12:52 PM
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1994 Honda Civic - won't start - am learning - starter fluid spray?

Hi:

ukrbyk gave me instructions to follow to see what the problem was starting my 1994 4-door Honda Civic and I did check the distributor (good), the spark plugs (clean, almost new) and the fuel filter and fuel pump (and so the main relay) are OK - fuel spurted out the fuel filter top when I opened the top bolt and turned the ignition to the on position (Eric the Car Guy on youtube check - thanks, Eric!).

So another thing I saw on this site I think was to try to spray starter fluid into the air intake and try to see if it starts for a few seconds but I just want to make sure that I am spraying the fluid in the right spot. I am attaching a picture where I think the fluid goes after I remove the clamp and the hose? If someone could confirm this so I don't blow up my car, I would appreciate it! I've put a white square around where I am going to take the hose off (I think). This isn't my car, I think this is ukrbyk's picture but it's pretty much the same thing except my hose is all black rubber.

Thanks. Suessy.
 
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Old 05-02-11, 03:08 PM
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I'll get back with you later.
btw, you need to check if:
1. the fuel is getting into the combustion chambers, aka spark plugs smell of gas
2. if you have spark. that spark plugs look ok, means nothing.

honda distributors have several parts in them that fail - ignitor and coil. both can cause no start.
hey, where's my picture of your distributor?

no, you will not blow the car. you can, also, simply pour some gas into air intake, just a little bit. vapors are less volatile than starting fluid, and will give less bang. ultimately - it's a honda, not gonna break.

did you try reading codes off your EC M, engine computer?

yes, you can spray it there. but it's a 2 men job - one sprays, one picks up on gas pedal.

betcha it's your distributor....

but on those cars, no starts are either main relay, or distributor/ignitor/coil or igntion switch.
 
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Old 05-02-11, 05:35 PM
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suessy, here's compilation of all possible causes for your Honda to not start:

Honda/Acura Main FAQ Page
 
  #4  
Old 05-02-11, 06:23 PM
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Hold up take a step and breath. I usually only use carb and brake cleaner to spray in the take. Have someone hold the throttle full open with that black 2 or 3" hose off. Have them crank then spray burst the throttle body a little. If it tries to start and dies then you have a fuel issue. Disconnect the vaucuum hose to the fuel pressue regulator and see if gas seeps out. I personally would pull the spark plug boot out stick a screw up it and lay it next to something metal on the engine and watch when someone cranks if it spark to the block. you could also have a spark plug stick out to resting on the engine. I would determine if you have spark first then get back to us.
 
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Old 05-03-11, 07:23 AM
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1ST OF ALL - THANK YOU UKRBYK AND BOREDATWORK!

ukrbyk - I cut off the distributor part of the picture to make it smaller. I did check the distributor - I took it off and it looked really clean and when I cranked it once I put it back, I took it off again and the rotor had changed position. I actually have another distributor (new - bought another time) so I will just try that one too.

OK - will use gas if I need to but I'll check the spark doing that thing boredatwork describes (I also saw it online where you keep the spark plug in the wire and place it on the engine and turn over the car and watch for the spark at the other end of the spark plug) and have someone help me.

ukrbyk - I read the manual and it is pretty clear on how to read the codes so I just have to check the engine light flashes and it says to put a wire on one of the wires under the dash to interrupt the current and read the codes so I will do that.

Wow - am getting more impressed with you guys - at least now all of the parts in the engine don't look so alien to me anymore. I can actually point out and name parts!!!!!!!!

It may take me a few days (again, weather permitting cuz car is in a church parking lot) but I will probably be asking more questions - you guys have given me a lot to do!

Thanks again for now - Suessy - I am now going to read your Honda link, ukrbyk
 
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Old 05-03-11, 05:07 PM
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Don't poor gas in. Burst spray it with carb or brake cleaner. If you poor a lot of gas in you could hydrolock engine and risk damaging it.
 
  #7  
Old 05-09-11, 09:34 AM
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Screw off rotor in distributor - honda civic 1994

Hi boredatwork or ukrbyk (or anyone who has a trick for this!):

Well - I checked everything - I even followed the instructions to check the fuel pressure regulator line flow (I can't get that dang clamp back on but I digress!).

I couldn't get the screw out of the rotor to take it off! Does anyone have a trick for this or do I have to remove the whole distributor to saw it off or something? It's just a Philips head screw with stripped slots and no screwdriver I have will stay in it to turn it. I also tried needlenose pliers and linesmen pliers (see how I am learning the terms?) and I can't budge it. It is a round head screw! What's maddening is that this is an easy thing to replace and I actually HAVE another new rotor to replace it with and I am soooooooooo close to having checked everything and now I can't do this! I went a bought a set of bits to see if other types of bits would fit into the screw head and no dice? The only thing I can think of is to remove the whole distributor but that seems so unnecessary. I even did the check for the spark thing across the spark plug gap and no spark was there - I think it must be the rotor!

Suessy
 
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Old 05-09-11, 04:42 PM
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Not sure where you read about checking fuel line flow. Good news is you have no spark. Thats progess and may mean the rotor might not have to be replaced. If you really want to persist on the rotor I would use a hack saw blade to cut a valley in the center of the bolt. This way you can use a flat head to back it out. Most likely your rotor is ok. Is the brass top slightly dark use some sand paper on it to brush off the corrosion and leave it on the car. Bend the tab up some or the center one in the distrubitor down some. Your issue most likely lies in the coil pack if the car is not throwing codes. Check the 12V side of the coil. I would place bets on coil pack or ignition control module for your issue. If you mess up the bolt for the rotor this time you will need to remove the distributor and get a reverse drill bit. hopefully that will pull it out while drilling if not then you need to redrill and retap it. or drill it out then use a sheet metal screw to hold the new one on. You could get away with not even putting a screw on it since the distributor cap will hold it down.
 
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Old 05-09-11, 04:48 PM
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To check the ignition coil, measure the resistance between the (+), black/yellow wire, terminal and the (-), white/blue wire, terminal of the coil. The resistance should be about 0.6 to 0.8 ohms. Basically a really low reading means good. This will check if the low voltage side of the coil is ok. Next you need to know if the 12V ignition relay is ok. You can do this by checking the ignition coil pig tail for 12V between the 2 pins of the connector to it with the key turned to on. also check the resistance between the (+), black/yellow wire, terminal and the coil wire terminal. It should be about 12,000 to 19,200 ohms This will check the high voltage side of the coil.
 
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Old 05-10-11, 02:00 PM
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Hack saw it is! OK - I will do the other stuff too - I just have to read it carefully and see what the heck you mean!

Thanks again, boredatwork!

Suessy
 
  #11  
Old 05-10-11, 03:32 PM
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sue, i have a brand new distributor i am willing to donate to you. just pick up shipping cost. but you need to get me a good picture of yours, as they have various fitments from year to year. one i have was for 95 Civic. hence, i need very good pic of what yours look like. they had 2 types of distributors per year, and there's big difference in mounts between the 2.
i also have new coil.
you not gonna get to that bolt with hacksaw. at least, not with distributor in the engine bay. there's a special hacksaw that has a handle on one side, short blade, and the blade is open on the other end. that you can try. otherwise, vise grip pliers should do it. i know exactly what you talking about. better off, find a buddy with Dremel and use that to cut a slot. what will happen, you will probably rip the head off with flat head screwdriver, as that head is so small, there's no metal left after cutting slot. and if you break that head off...
boredatwork, i am not going to get into fight over if it can or can not be done with hacksaw. i have 2 Civics behind my belt, one had that bolt stuck dead. i have been there.
if the worse comes to worse, you'll need to pull distributor out and drill that screw head out and through the rotor, as close to the shaft as possible. it's a tricky job....
once again, link i sent you is COMPLETE knowledge on how to fix EVERYTHING on Civics. with practical advice and pictures. tells you how to test EVERY piece in ignition system. so, instead of trying to whack distributor, start where it all needs to start - main relay - and take it from there. if you do not have spark, it's main relay, or coil, or ignitor.
 
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Old 05-10-11, 06:49 PM
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sue, if this is what you have, i'll be glad to mail you these parts. distributor is brand new, not rebuild. it is complete, including coil and ignitor. coil is separate piece, also brand new.
be very careful, as they had 2 different distributor manufacturers, Denso and I think Toshiba. it varies from a var to a car. crucial cues are mounts orientation and plugs configuration. we had to go through 3 or 4, before we found this one for my son's Civic. He sold his car "as is", we still do not know why it refused to start, but I have those parts left sitting in my garage for some year already.


distributor pictures by ukrkoz - Photobucket
 
  #13  
Old 05-15-11, 11:46 AM
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ukrbyk or boredatwork replies

Hi!

I have to say, ukrbyk, that boredatwork had a great idea. I actually got the screw out quite easily by scoring the top as boredatwork suggested but I did it by taking the little saw blade OUT of the mini hacksaw that I already had at home and just putting it in the opening at the side of the rotor and pressing on it from the top with one finger and sawing back and forth with my other hand. It took only about 15 min to get a trench plenty deep for the screwdriver. I am so impressed with myself! The bad news is that the rotor wasn't the problem ... crap.

I am including pictures here of distributor type and I am including a close-up picture of the blade to show how tiny the blade ridges are just to show what works on these types of bolt tops.

My next step is to follow ukrbyk's instructions to check the coil. I am just going to now read instructions on how to use my little digital multimeter to see if I can do this. I am so going to be a car expert! At least I can sound like one.

But - I did kind of break off a bit of the distributor cover plate at the top after I got the screw out actually.

I don't know if you guys are sticking with me or anyone is interested in this but there may be people out there who are complete newbies who have no money to spend on garages.

Thanks again, you guys! I will re-post after I do the coil thing.

Suessy








 
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Old 05-15-11, 07:09 PM
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well, that's exactly the tool i was referring to. mini hacksaw, that's what it's called? i must applaud your hand skill. and commend bored for great suggestion.
sorry to say this, but from pics posted, i can not really say if you have direct match to what i am offering you. if you can log into that distributor pictures, maybe print them and ask someone to take close look at yours?
main difference in those is the way attachment "ears" are angled and connector plugs. realistically speaking, you will be better off pulling distributor out and comparing to one i have. trying to look it up through parts stores will be very hard, their database is very often wrong.
like i said, if this is a direct match, i have no problems donating it to you. new is new.
 
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Old 05-15-11, 07:22 PM
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sorry. mine is different. upper, towards the top of the engine, "ear" is angled forward more than yours.
also, went through all pics in your album.
1. your distributor shaft seals are leaking oil. it's easy fix, simply pull distributor out, and replace 2 O-rings on the shaft. ABSOLUTELY MAKE SURE YOU DO NOT MOVE ROTOR. it has to go back exactly same way it was before.
2. you have some serious oil leak into plug wells. if it's the way it shows on the pic, those plugs will never fire. you have to replace seals that are under the camshaft and all valve cover seals.

YouTube - Spark Plug Well Oil Leak Fix, Honda Accord

YouTube - 1994 Honda Civic Part 1: Valve Cover Gasket Repair

procedure for Accord is same for Civic
 
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Old 05-16-11, 09:11 AM
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so maybe it's just the oil in the spark plug wells?

OK for the distributor - thanks anyway for checking ukrbyk!

I will check out the youtube links you sent. Thanks. The seals may be too difficult for me to do but it's worth a look ... drat!

Suessy
 
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Old 05-16-11, 02:01 PM
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sorry. Those distributors are PITA because they had so many mounting options and 2 manufacturers. we normally take them out and start driving through parts stores, looking for direct match.

like i said - if you have that much oil leaking down into plug wells, you might as well stop chasing anything else - there will be no spark. it looked totally soaked in oil. this is even without mentioning that those plug wires most likely need to be replaced anyway, there's probably a ton of crud inside plug nipples.
 
  #18  
Old 05-17-11, 10:02 AM
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Oil in spark plug wells and valve cover gasket(s)

I changed the wires and I watched the videos and I certainly can change the valve cover gasket stuff but the spark plug oil well gaskets I'm not sure because a lot of parts have to come off for that! I'm afraid I wouldn't put them back on correctly or I'd forget something.

I'm looking right now for the new gaskets. The screws undid like a charm on the gasket cover.

BTW, just a note of interest, I also ordered a new rotor retaining screw to replace the one I had to work out. I could only find one at Honda and nobody anywhere (and I checked a few car places) seemed to know that the rotor retaining screw had to be diamagnetic (anti-magnetic)! But I figured if I get it from Honda it should be OK - it will be in the Honda dealer parts department for me for tomorrow morning for about $4 CAD.

It's a bit of a culture shock for me! Men in these car shops and at the car parts counters still look at me as though I shouldn't be doing this though - I'll just have to prove them wrong. Some, I have to say are doubly helpful telling me extra stuff (like the experts here) so it's working out so far!

Suessy
 
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Old 05-17-11, 01:55 PM
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dye your hair blond and "men in those shops" will be eating off your hand and jumping all over you to help you..

well, prove men wrong completely and do the well seals too. it's not that hard, actually, you simply need to be careful. organized. and have maybe slightly more tools than you have now. but it's a Honda, all you need is 8 and 10mm sockets. kidding.

hey, can you pull a spark plug out and take a close up picture of it? i am curious how much crud is on electrodes.
 
  #20  
Old 05-20-11, 06:07 PM
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I just had my hair dyed blonde on Wed! Wow - you're psychic!

Thanks ukrbyk:

I changed the valve cover gaskets/spark plug seals and grommets. I didn't do the spark plug well thing yet. But ... I checked the ohms across the places on the distributor things and I got 1.0 across the pos and neg terminals and 9.55 across the coil terminal and the pos terminal. From what boredatwork says below, that's really low.

There are new coil modules on eBay for about $25 before shipping - would this be what the problem is? Would this stop it from sparking? And yes, I will take pictures of the old spark plugs - I changed all of them when I changed the valve cover gasket.

Thanks again for sticking with me. You're right about the tools though. I haven't needed that many! Do I really need to torque the screws on the valve cover to 90 ft-lbs as Eric the Car Guy says? If so, once my car starts, I'll use my blond advantage and ask someone in a shop to torque them and try not to sound too suggestive! Those torque wrenches are expensive, especially if you don't use them often.

I only have the internet at work so if it takes a couple of days to get the pictures to you, please understand - it's the long weekend and I have to make the trip in.

If I get this car going, I am soooooo going to restore it completely after all the work I've put into it and after what I am learning!

Suessy
 
  #21  
Old 05-21-11, 09:49 AM
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well, told many times: it's distributor, or ignitor, or coil, or main relay.
btw, some rotors on those have built in resistor, that may go wrong and cause no spark, but you replaced that.
you did read honda repairs link i sent you, didn't you?
we had so many posts here, i lost track of what was done. let me ask you this. when you crank engine, and it does not start, and you take spark plug out right away - is does smell of gas, right?

those are very good cars. it is well worth bringing it back to life. when you get her going, you'll have great mileage and she'll take you anywhere. i had 91, son had 94 or 95, they were very good cars.

once again, i seriously recommend to follow the link i gave you. those are real life people with real life experiences. spot electrical problems over internet is virtually impossible.

yes, you either torque those bolts to spec, or hand torque them tight. they have a special recess that do not allow to strip them. if you get them loose, your valve cover WILL leak. right by distributor and timing belt. you did put beads of silicone there, didn't you?
 
  #22  
Old 05-21-11, 09:55 AM
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Vehicle wiring advice

The Honda main relay is use to power up your coil and ecm but the quickest way to test that is to listen to your fuel pump if you can hear it come on when you turn your key to the on position. The main relay does it thru the yellow black wire that powers the injector and the green yellow wire that goes to pin #7 at your computer. However, the quickest way to check if the main relay is working is to watch the dash “engine service” light. It should come on when you turn the key on and quit. If it stays on, either the main relay or ecu (computer) is bad and you can find that if you have a code.

The coil can be checked quickly by removing the cap of the distributor and checking the negative side of the coil with a test light. If you crank it and the test light blinks, it means the module called igniter is working and the coil is bad. Make sure you have 12 volts going to the coil on the positive side with key on.

The presence of oil in your distributor will usually make the sensors inside the distributor fail and the most common symptom of that is there will be no injector signal which points to a bad crank sensor or cam sensor. When this happens, replace the sensors too or the complete distributor.

It is a common practice among garages to change BOTH coil and igniter when either one of them fails. Bad spark plugs usually makes the coil go bad and make sure to change them when servicing the distributor including plug wires, cap and rotors. Always buy OEM parts if you can to avoid repeated failures.

Disconnect battery negative terminal everytime you work any electrical component.
 
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Old 05-21-11, 10:02 AM
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also, read error codes off your ECM, or engine computer:

Reading error codes on 92-95 Civics (OBD-I Hondas)

the connector they are referring to is quite hard to find. it is under the dashboard, on passenger side. roughly, ahead of your knee if you sit in that seat. it is right below the dashboard, tucked into the corner behind the door jam. all it is is a loose hanging 2 wires with a plastic connector attached. you need to jump those 2 connectors, by shortening them, connecting them together with a paperclip. bend it into U-shape and stick in.
 
  #24  
Old 05-21-11, 12:09 PM
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If you took your measurements correct, sounds like you may have found the problem. Also Like Ub says turn the key to On and listen for the fuel pump to buzz for a few seconds right after you turn the key on. I am really busy finishing up some hybrid car designs and getting them sourced. Will pay attention to the postings but sounds like your on the right track and in good hands.
 
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Old 05-22-11, 10:51 AM
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Red face

OK - thanks again, you guys! I am going to bite the bullet and buy a distributor and change the whole thing out after I check again for the 12V and the codes which looks interesting to do. This all looks pretty easy after all the rest I've done! Holy cow! I will n.e.v.e.r. go to a garage again to have a tune-up done. I probably know as much as any newbie mechanic by now.

I'll make sure the valve cover bolts are torqued to spec, ukrbyk, and I did put silicone just in the end spots exactly where Eric the Car Guy did in his video - and the battery is dead due to trying to start the car (I am using a booster to crank it!) but I will take off the negative connection anyway.

Yes, I can hear the fuel pump noise, boredatwork - thanks for taking time out to check back with me!

This was really worth the time and the effort plus I can't believe that I'm actually having fun - because what you guys are saying actually works! Although once I get the money I will take it to a shop and have an expert work on it from now on but now I will know who is an expert and who isn't! I think people are afraid to try these things and so it is forever mystifying. Hopefully I'll have good news in a few days.

THANKS AGAIN!

Suessy
 
  #26  
Old 05-22-11, 11:07 AM
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Old spark plugs pictures

And ukrbyk - btw - here are pictures of the old spark plugs.

Suessy



 
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Old 05-22-11, 02:20 PM
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plugs are not bad. not too good, but worse work.

you know, here's the thing. most people are so much ignorant and under the spell of sales and marketing pitch, that they think mechs are some sort of demigods, that hover up in the sky and have some sort of superior knowledge. actually, they are not. they are sometimes folks that went to school, sometimes learned it through apprenticeship. some have never learned. everyone else in the country is about as qualifying to be a mech, as mechs themselves.
hence, you are taking all the right steps in the right direction. 1. developing mental bravery to decide to do it. 2. learning 3. doing. thereafter, thing called experience comes. thereafter, thing called mechanical mind develops. of course you will not pay someone else trifold to replace your spark plugs and wires. you'll doit yourself. and reward will be not as much monetary, as in form of self satisfaction. this is priceless.

hey, do not buy refurbished dizzy. distributor. buy new. one i showed you in the picture is brand new, all componentry new. surprisingly, costs less than refurbished.
 
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Old 05-24-11, 01:50 PM
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ukrbyk - I was just thinking about refurbished distributor vs new and I agree with you - new is better - I will go with that. The refurbished is $90 and the new is $128 online - I just have to wait a couple of weeks for delivery but that is totally do-able. For the extra $38 I get a much better guarantee.

And yes, this knowledge is priceless and thank the automotive gods for the internet and people like you and the other experts here who talk us all through this!

ttys

Suessy
 
  #29  
Old 05-24-11, 06:19 PM
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yours is cheap! we paid $178 plus tax for ours. surprisingly, refurbished ones were more than that new one.
 
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Old 06-11-11, 03:17 PM
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ukrbyk or boredatwork: I hope you guys are still out there! I changed the distributor (really easy!) - not new but I found a Honda mechanic (13 years of service and now he has his own shop across the bridge from Montreal) who sold me one ($40) he pulled from his son's 1993 Civic. I just changed the whole thing over - same cranking only problem. So I did the ECU check. I jumped the service connector and turned the switch to the "ON" position and the CEL just stayed on, period. This is supposed to be a main relay problem, no? The fuel pump works because it whirrs and as I said before, I checked the fuel filter gas spurting when I undo the top bolt and the fuel return line test where the fuel fills up a cup when you turn the switch to "ON". Can the main relay be bad only for the ignition wiring? I'm having a really hard time getting the dang bolt off to take out the main relay little box!

I visually checked the ECU and while yes, there is some rust on the lower part of the ECU's outer cover where some water had obviously got in, inside the cover it is dry as a bone. That's really all I have left to check.

Thanks yet once again!
Suessy
 
  #31  
Old 07-02-11, 12:17 PM
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Since you can hear the fuel pump priming and have pressure at the filter, that's a good sign as its getting power from the main relay. What I would recommend is testing for spark at the plugs. You can buy an spark tester that looks just like a real plug with a ground clip on it. Remove 1 cylinder spark plug wire and connect it to the tester, then clip it to the ground wire running to the valve cover. Crank the engine and check for spark. Repeat for the other 3 cylinders verifying spark. You can use an real plug if you don't have a tester, just hold the tip against a good ground and crank, but its hard with one person. If they all have spark then your the problem is not with the ignition system.

I would also test your injector harness is receiving power from your main relay and the ecu is grounding them correctly in order to spray fuel into the combustion chamber. You need a noid light tester kit for this. You can get them at a parts store. Remove the wire harness clip from the first injector and plug the noid tester into it. Crank the engine and verify the light is flashing. Check the remaining 3 for power. If all are flashing the ecu is mostly likely functioning correctly.
 
  #32  
Old 07-03-11, 06:33 AM
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yeah, that main relay is a female canine to get out, that it is.
your car awfully sounds like my son's Civic, when it simply died on him 1/4 mile away from home. we replaced all parts you did, including brand spanking new distributor i was offering. crank, no start.
we gave up and sold it as is. even almost got our money worth out of this.
guys who bought her called son next day, standing next to running car and letting him listen to the engine running sound on cell phone. according to them, it was bad distributor. the very moment they replaced it, car came back to life. that's best i can tell you.
if you main relay clicks 3 times, when you turn key 3 times - it's working.
 
  #33  
Old 07-03-11, 06:47 AM
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The Main Relay will click three times during the starting process. When problems arise, one of those clicks (usually the third) is missing, making those clicks a handy diagnostics tool.

If you consistently hear/feel all three clicks, the Relay is fine. DO NOT REPLACE IT.

Turn ignition to ON (but not to START): Click 1
Check Engine light goes off: Click 2
You now turn the key to START: Click 3

The most common symptom is that you crank, the engine starts, but as soon as you let go of the key, it stalls. If you listen carefully, you'll hear the clicks as they happen. If your ears are poor, or surroundings are noisy, reach behind the dash and put your hands on the relay to feel the clicks


Starting Problems

no, CEL continuous ON is not sign of bad main relay. and if your ECU got wet.....

you know, i was the one who kept encouraging you to DIY all this. i'd say - hey, it will cost you around $150 to get her fixed at sat Greg's Japanese Auto or other similar outfit. Maybe it's the way to go, after all? you've been messing with this for LONG time getting nowhere.
 
  #34  
Old 07-03-11, 06:50 AM
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If you have a solid CEL whether the service connector is jumped or not jumped, that is a faulty ECU code.

also, check ECU fuse. if it's blown, there will be no power to ECU
 
  #35  
Old 07-06-11, 07:59 AM
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Hi ukrbyk:

OK - so here's the scoop - I finally took it to a Honda mechanic who found the problem in a couple of hours. He said it was a fuse and a corroded wire. This is the father of the young man who sold me a distributor (super guy!). I did check all the fuses which seemed fine so I'm thinking it was the wire. Anyway, I learned a *ton* thanks to you (and boredatwork and ErictheCarGuy). It cost me $140 (Cdn of course!) for solving the problem and I got a better distributor out of it because mine had oil in it from the valve cover gasket spewing oil onto e.v.e.r.y.t.h.i.n.g in the engine and this cost me $40. Add the cost of a few very basic tools, say another $50. So all of this was cheap at twice the price considering the knowledge I gained. I can now do the basic stuff and even put together a distributor (I took apart my old one!) but the electrics baffle me and that's where I had to draw the line. Woah! This is where experience is worth paying for people! I am picking my car up tonight or tomorrow, God willin' and the criks don't rise, and I am just going to do some (easy!) body work and a few little things that I know I can handle and woohoo! - that's it. Thank you so much!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
  #36  
Old 07-06-11, 05:09 PM
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whoo-hoo!
funny, i was almost right on price.
fuse box in those has ground wire that comes from the bottom to it, and is hidden - and yes, it can get oxidized easily.
well, if i were you, i'd leave her as is. why bother with cosmetics? does not influence speed or gas mileage.
she'll serve you well, just keep changing oil with quality one and same goes for ATF. should be doing around 35mpg average. good cars.
 
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