fix a flat

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  #1  
Old 07-01-11, 12:34 PM
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fix a flat

Hello
I have my wife carry a can of this in the trunk.
I know people who repair tires don't like it for obvious reasons.
Isn't it a good idea for an elderly woman to carry if she is instructed about how to use it properly rather than get killed on a highway before AAA arrives or before a spare can be mounted. In other words, as an emergency inflation to get her safely to a repair shop.
It can't ruin the tire because the valve can always be replaced.
A friend told me it would ruin my tire but I don't see how if used as directed.
Thank you
 
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  #2  
Old 07-01-11, 12:41 PM
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Just as likely to get run over while trying to get the fix-a-flat in the tire I would think.

Plus the user has to make the technical determination that whatever made it go flat isd repairable within the capabilities of the product. About as often as not, when I do a tire change road-side the tire is history; the slow-leaker from a nail flats are sitting in someone's driveway.
 
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Old 07-01-11, 12:44 PM
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Just as likely to get run over while trying to get the fix-a-flat in the tire
My thoughts exactly. I would just stay in the car and sit on the side farthest away from traffic.
 
  #4  
Old 07-01-11, 12:48 PM
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I always told my ex-wife to exit the freeway altogether (driving slowly on the shoulder) rather than sit on the shoulder of the freeway, it's much easier to replace a ruined tire (and maybe wheel as well) than a person
 
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Old 07-01-11, 12:57 PM
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Tires are 100 bucks. Not worth the danger unless you wear a yellow cape like TG Stay in the car and drive it as far as necessary on the flat to get to safety. You've already probably ruined the tire, anyway.
Now, for a parking lot flat, that's a different story. I keep cans of the stuff in both cars and will use them as necessary and safe to do so. Some populated areas are not safe to even walk to the car, much less fix a flat, so you have to be the judge.
 
  #6  
Old 07-01-11, 01:02 PM
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I would not trust my wife with a can of tire fxing material. She does not even know when the tire is low by looking at it and has almost ruined a few.

She has the road service number programmed in her cell phone and just wait if I cannot get there to help. She may not know exactly where she is because she is "geographically challenged" and refuses to look at a map for help.

On the last tire she ruined, she thought something was wrong and it went bad after being driven flat and it stopped about a mile after the tire store at 0F, so she had to get a tow back. We just bought another Michelin LXT M/S for the SUV to match the rest of hers and my identical tires on an identical car that somehow seem to last much longer.

Dick
 
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Old 07-01-11, 01:27 PM
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Fix a flat is for when you are in your driveway w/o an air compressor and can drive a mile to a garage. Put it in..wait 30 min see if it holds and go to the garage. Of course...most garages would send someone to you if you are that close.

That said....I carry cans in both cars...but I wouldn't expect my wife to know the right time to use it. Of course we live out here where the nearest garage/tow service could be 100 miles away.

If you live in a city..don't mess with it
 
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Old 07-01-11, 02:07 PM
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I guess I take a more extreme approach - I carry a 12v compressor, vice grips and a repair kit in my car and can often fix a flat without taking the wheel off the car. If I need to remove the wheel to find the hole, I also have a 12v impact wrench, 24" breaker bar, speed and torque wrenches in the trunk for that.

I used to drive 35,00 miles a year and would get 1-2 flats every year.
 
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Old 07-01-11, 02:27 PM
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FWIW I would rather have a root canal than change a flat on the interstate. Love the Road Ranger program run by the FHP who take care of some of those. I've sometimes towed the vehicle at no extra charge over what the tire change would be rather than work on the roadside.
 
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Old 07-01-11, 03:01 PM
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I've been lucky and never had a flat on the interstate - I think I'd exit the freeway before working on the car
 
  #11  
Old 07-01-11, 03:03 PM
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The use of it is judgement.
I was trying to tell my friend it was not going to harm the tire and wanted to know if it would or would not do so.
 
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Old 07-01-11, 06:27 PM
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oh, wow, so many posts and no one got to the bottom of it.
fixflat or equivalent will fix your tire, that it will do.
but there's a wisdom: in nature, there's no rewards or punishments, only consequences.
and there will be at least two flaxfit use.
1. liquid is designed to gum inside a the hole and tire, and plug the hole; also, newer ones, are designed to inflate tire to fairly safe pressure. well, here's the thing. it does gum inside, BUT UNEVENLY. you end up with unbalanced tire, that no one can balance. BEEN THERE. tire needs to be unmounted, perfectly cleaned inside, and re-mounted. even if it did not gum inside, you end up with a loose jelly like chunk of fluid, wondering inside the tire at will. learned this lesson the hard way.
2. it is said to slowly eat tire rubber from the inside. that i have no experienced, but have tendency to trust the source.
might be a better idea to simply add roadside to your insurance, for like 20 bucks x 6 mths, or sign up with AARP, or even add it to your cell plan. verizon does. of course, you can carry bathtub filled with water to spot leak and all the tools needed to fix it...
 
  #13  
Old 07-02-11, 05:45 AM
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And there used to be an issue with the propellant being flammable, although I think they are now non-flammable. When they were flammable, not an issue while in the tire, but if the next tire store worker who opens the tire happens to be smoking.....

"Isn't it a good idea for an elderly woman to carry if she is instructed about how to use it properly rather than get killed on a highway before AAA arrives or before a spare can be mounted?"

I thought that was answered rather thoroughly; the question of tire damage, IMHO, was secondary.
 
  #14  
Old 07-02-11, 06:56 AM
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Well I drive on $25 Maypop tires on $15 junk yard rims. I'll drive those suckers till the tire comes off the rim if I have to to get to a safe place. I have actually seen people changing driver side tires on the road when there was a public parking lot 50 feet away. Partly to blame is tire guarantees that say not valid if tire is driven flat and old instruction manuals that say to stop immediately if you have a flat.

As to Fixaflat if you use it don't try to get a permanent fix in an upper class neighborhood. The gas stations will claim tire is not fixable because Fixaflat was used. I know that from personal experience when I was doing hot-shot delivery. Took the same tire to my usual low income neighborhood tire fixer and no problem getting it fixed. Got many more miles out of that sucker.
 
  #15  
Old 07-02-11, 09:52 AM
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I started the thread so I will tell those interested my conclusion.
Give the can to someone you don't like
We have AAA plus so we will be safe and let each do their job,i.e., tow, repair properly.
I was plugging cars in the early 50's with rolled up inner tube pieces from bikes with some cement.
We have come a long way since and I am willing to go along with common sense. I just wish more of it prevailed.
I told you I would investigate and tell you about my reading. The material in the fix a flat is fouling up some of the newer cars sensors/computers;I do not know how but if you Google it you will find it. That put the lid on for me as it voids the warranty and is expensive to repair and reset.
Thank you all for Your advice.
 
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Old 07-02-11, 09:02 PM
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Hadn't thought about sensors; that would be the pressure sensors in the newer car's monitoring systems which are inside the tire attached to the stem.
 
  #17  
Old 07-03-11, 06:12 AM
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I never thought of that either.
I have a little icon on the dashboard and if the tire is low, it supposedly turns red and looks like a deflated tire.
Tough to keep up with everything for computers to chewing gum.
 
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