brakes

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  #1  
Old 09-27-11, 03:17 AM
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brakes

i have a 98 plymouth breeze the back right rear brake line broke there there is a valve there could someone tell me what that is called your rubber line from the wheel runs into it
 
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Old 09-27-11, 04:12 AM
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Welcome to the forums! I am not sure what you are looking at, but there is a bleeder valve to which the brake line attaches. Is that what you are referring to? It has a nipple on the end and a place to put a wrench on the lower part, and is about 1/2" long.
 
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Old 09-27-11, 04:29 AM
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Been wracking my brain trying to figure out anything other than the bleeder as chandler says; can't think of anything else back there.

Here's what the wheel cylinder looks like when removed on drum brakes (I'm thinking your Breeze will be drums rather than disc). The brass part is the bleeder:

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I'm thinking that the rubber portion of the line wouldn't go all the way to the wheel cylinder, though. Only other thing I can think of would be a simple junction block where the incoming brake line from the master splits to go to the rear wheels.
 
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Old 09-27-11, 06:10 AM
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Don't know why TG's link wouldn't work

You have one hard brake line going to the rear axle [if it has one] and then it splits off to each rear brake. The hard line attaches directly to the wheel cylinder. There shouldn't be any flexible brake line on the rear. The bleeder might have a rubber cap.

Could you supply us with a pic? http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
 
  #5  
Old 09-27-11, 06:41 AM
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I am thinking the same as TG that there is a flex line running from the wheel cylinder to a junction bracket/block where the steel line attaches.
 
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Old 09-27-11, 06:47 AM
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Hmmm does the Breeze have IRS? Or a solid rear axle?
 
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Old 09-27-11, 08:18 AM
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The Breeze being a pretty basic model I was guessing nothing fancy like ABS, IRS, or rear discs. Tried to find pics on autozone.com, but didn't find any with enough detail to tell much.

Mark, I clicked my link and it opened fine, must be you.
 
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Old 09-27-11, 08:30 AM
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Rear: Quad-link SLA: A-arm, lateral link, tow-link and trailing link; concentric coil spring shock; sway bar linked to tow link.

I found this about it....I would assume the A-arm would indicate IRS? Dunno for sure...
 
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Old 09-27-11, 08:35 AM
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From what I found out, the Breeze had a wishbone multi link rear suspension with drum brakes. All basic and low cost design that would require a flexible brake line connection.
 
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Old 09-27-11, 09:36 AM
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I guess I've been around too many old cars and trucks - I never even considered the possibility of an IRS
 
  #11  
Old 09-27-11, 12:50 PM
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no this is on the end of your rubber line that goes to your wheel and your brake line hook into it i was told it was a performace valve
 
  #12  
Old 09-27-11, 01:32 PM
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a proportionate valve maybe? what it does, it is supposed to equalize brake pressure between front and rear axles, so that all four are braking more or less equally.

starts sounding like he has this:


On 1999 Jeep Grand Cherokee models and 2000 model year Neons, a variant of the Mark 20 system called the Mark 20e is used. The system is functionally identical to the Mark 20 except that it uses a different type of wheel speed sensor. This is necessary because the Mark 20e system handles more than ABS and traction control. It also controls front-to-rear brake proportioning during normal braking. This eliminates the need for a separate proportioning valve in the brake system, and is called an "Electronically Variable Brake Proportioning System" or EVBPS.

EVBPS
The advantage of EVBPS is that it can fine-tune rear brake balance to changing load, road and braking conditions. A conventional brake proportioning valve is calibrated to reduce brake pressure to the rear wheels by a fixed amount. When the brakes are first applied, pressure to the front and rear brakes is the same. But as the driver presses harder on the pedal, pressure to the rear brakes is typically reduced by up to 50 percent. This is necessary to prevent the lightly loaded rear wheels from locking up and skidding. But a fixed calibration is always a compromise. It works well enough for normal driving and braking on dry pavement, but may not work so well if a vehicle is heavily loaded or is driven on a wet or slick road.

Some vehicles have rear brake proportioning valves with a mechanical linkage attached to the rear suspension. These are typically used in pickup trucks and minivans because the weight on the rear wheels can change significantly depending if the vehicle is empty or heavily loaded. The linkage reacts to changes in ride height that occur when weight is added to the back of the vehicle. Increasing the load lowers the ride height, moves the linkage and changes the position of a metering valve inside the proportioning valve to increase the amount of pressure routed to the rear wheels when the brakes are applied.

With EVBPS in the Mark 20e system, there is no proportioning valve so brake pressure to both rear wheels is regulated electronically. The controller constantly monitors rear wheel speed and adjusts the amount of pressure to the rear wheels by opening the normally closed rear outlet ABS valves. By changing the frequency and duration at which both rear outlet valves are pulsed open, the controller can regulate rear brake pressure as needed.
 
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Old 09-27-11, 03:09 PM
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Looks like Ukrbyk nailed it. All part of a Teves ABS system they installed starting 1998.
 
  #14  
Old 09-28-11, 02:46 AM
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can this be taken out and if so what will i have to have to replace it
 
  #15  
Old 09-28-11, 06:16 AM
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Brakes are the most important system on a vehicle. If you have to ask these questions you are very likely better off to have a professional do the repair. No disrespect intended.
 
  #16  
Old 09-28-11, 04:44 PM
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I had a 99 Intrepid with no ABS and it had those individual proportioning valves on the rear which leaked.
Best to replace with new.
Can be hard to get at if you are not familiar with working on cars and have limited equiptment.
I suggest a shop.
Just some brake line work and the valves and a flush should not be big bucks.
Get 2 or 3 estimates from different shops
 
  #17  
Old 09-28-11, 06:50 PM
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lynn, do this. go to a library. find Chilton for your car. Scope what it takes to have job done. Then, sit and honestly to yourself, decide if you want to DIY it, or is it better to pay someone to do it for you. Fair enough?
 
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