New Honda Accord

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  #1  
Old 03-22-12, 07:38 PM
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New Honda Accord

What amount mileage should one expect on disc brakes before they have to be repaired?

And should I be concerned about the obvious brake dust that I see on my wheels after only 600 miles of driving?

Thanks for reading and all replies.
 
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Old 03-22-12, 08:18 PM
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While it all depends on your driving habits and city verses highway driving, as well as the make and model of our vehicle, it is not uncommon to see some vehicles driving well over 100,000 miles on front brake pads, but most probably see half that due to a number of factors. Climate, road salt causing brake calipers to seize up, city vs highway driving mix, vehicle engineering, meaning the car maker installed the smallest brake set allowed to saves costs, and brake pad material used. Some brakes pads are softer than others or made out of different materials and will leave dusty wheels even as in your case after 600 miles. Ceramic pads which are not original equipped from some manufacturers will not leave black dust. In many cases these days also, brake rotors need to be resurfaced due to material buildup from the pads causing brake pedal pulsations well before the pads are actually worn out. With your new car I would not worry about the brake dust, that some of it this early is also normal due to the new brake pads getting broken in, and have them regularly checked periodically for wear, and if you live in a climate that receives alot of snow and road salt, consider having the brake calipers cleaned and greased yearly.
 
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Old 03-23-12, 08:12 AM
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Maybe not the be best advice, but if you can manage it, I would go to the dealership's service dept. and play dumb. Maybe they might do something under warranty. Probably nothing to worry about--but at least you are on record with them regarding a concern should something pop up later.
I personally have looked less than on-the-ball more than a few times, and it won't be my last. Put the ball in their court on this, you just never know.
 
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Old 03-23-12, 06:44 PM
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you should expect 60 000 to a 120 000 miles on OEM pads, with GM leading mileage. you prolly have smimet or semi organic pads, and they do "brake dust". wash it. I tried ceramics on imports, and they rub, annoyingly, so I went back to semi organics.
you should not "expect" any repairs. Rotors need to be de-glazed regularly, esp Honda ones, or they will shake your steering and front.
 
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Old 03-24-12, 03:56 AM
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Thank you for all the replies.

Do disc brakes last as long as drum type brakes?


I am not familiar with the term de-glazing. Can you tell me what this is?

Thx
 
  #6  
Old 03-24-12, 07:48 AM
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Yes wheel for wheel the better pads will last alot longer than drum and shoe, never mind the reason for them in the first place is to help the car stop better. Cars that use rear drums even these days will also last a long time because the rear brakes are only taking 30 to 40 percent of the vehicle braking requirement and in many cars the parking brake is never used also so will never have the potential to be left on, or to stick dragging the rear brakes. Rotors over time can build up deposits from the pads that get litterly burned into the metal rotor or disk. This can cause an uneven and inconsistant braking surface that will cause you to feel the brake pedal pulsating. You can expect this to happen at some point. The repair is to resurface the rotors (or what had been referred to as de-glazing from ukrbyk) through machining them, but some dIYers get good results by sanding the surface with a garnett type sand paper apparently. In cases if the rotors are worn too thin they are simply replaced. Enjoy your new car.
 
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Old 03-24-12, 12:21 PM
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You should be concerned as some earlier model Accords, model years 2008,and up,had Early brake wear that many owners complained about.

Honda put blame on owners
 
  #8  
Old 03-24-12, 01:50 PM
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I think that there had been a Class Action settled for 2008, 2009 and a few 2010's. There never was a determination around defect or not, but just an out court settlement to close it all out as a nuisance. I am sure that if in fact there was an issue, Honda would have sorted it all out for the past two year models for one thing already. Car companies these days do not go out of their way to destroy their reputation over something as serious as brakes and I assume that in this case they had not been able to ever demonstrate a real problem beyond normal reasonable wear issues. Remember it became almost fashionable during the unfair Toyota blame game to take anyone making a car to court. It is true that some vehicle brakes can wear faster than others. Just ask many Grand Am owners how long their front pads have ever lasted and some of that has to do with the fact that the brakes may have come from the Sunfire, a lighter car. It all comes down to what the customer expects these days and more and more it seems they want it all, they want it now, and they want it to last forever with no maintenance. Not going to happen in the real world.
 
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Old 03-24-12, 06:36 PM
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Thank you for all the replies.

Do disc brakes last as long as drum type brakes?


yes, they do. even with brake equalizer, you still brake more with front brakes. I'd say, roughly 3 times longer.


I am not familiar with the term de-glazing. Can you tell me what this is?


As you use brakes, slow amounts of brake materiel embed itself into the rotor surface; same time, pads basically polish rotor surface. As a result, you start seeing "glazed" surface, or almost mirror shine, on rotors. That's when they start making noises, or causing vibration in steering wheel during braking. It is common belief, that rotors "warp", or go out fo round. Proof is, they don't, but uneven pad material build up does happen. De-glazing is removing the outermost layer of build up and shine. You can use power tools to do that, rough sand paper, or turn rotors at a shop. Unfortunately, every time they turn rotors, some metal is removed, making it less and less useful over time. So far, every Honda we had, had very soft rotors, resulting in them "warping" very fast. Ones on my 07 TCH glaze very fast. Basically, you want to remove rotors once a year and remove any buildup on them. Followed by immediate rotor break in procedure (Google it)

Thx
 
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