1993 Toyota Corolla Front axle nuts removal

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  #1  
Old 05-19-12, 07:22 AM
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1993 Toyota Corolla Front axle nuts removal

Was hoping to be able to grease or replace the front wheel bearings but couldn't budge the axle nuts with a 6 point socket on a 3 foot 3/4 " breaker bar with a 6 foot piece of steam pipe as a "helper". This set-up usually moves nuts with 200 lb/foot torque.

I'm presuming the left axle is left hand threaded and the right is right hand thread.

Before I mess things up have I got these directions correct, and just how tight are these puppies ? I don't have access to an air or electric rattle gun - which is probably a good thing - but I do have some longer pipes :-)
 
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Old 05-19-12, 08:27 AM
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yeah...
don't remeber ever seeing them left and right hand threaded, but it might the case for you. we had brief ownership of 94 Corolla SW, which is your car, basically, and I could not break one nut either. I had entire car lifted off jackstand with cheat pipe, I stood on it, jumped on it, did left and right hand - could not. I had to replace clutch, took trannie out without removing drive axles, slammed pass side one back in, busted seal. had to replace seal.
as a result, I took entire hub with driveaxle out. wasn't that bad, actually, only about 30 mins.
but later I found better way. I needed to replace hub bearing on my pickup. buddy tipped me on this. so I drove to a mile away tire shop, they broke center nut loose for me with impact wrench, re-snugged it with torque bar, I drove back home, managed all this by hand, drove back to them, they re-torqued it back. gave guy 10 bucks.
I am smarter now. I have 90 gall comp and 1200 lb foot impact wrench. even that sometimes has to struggle with some nuts.
 
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Old 05-19-12, 08:30 AM
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just for clarification - I did not take drive axles out of hubs. only out of trannie and scooted them over to the sides, to clear trannie removal.
 
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Old 05-19-12, 01:54 PM
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Best of my knowledge they're both right hand threads. If it's the first time they've ever been apart, yeah, probably going to need an impact. The breaker bar/pipe route is probably wasted effort. On speaking terms with any garages? They could gun them loose and snug them back on to where you'll be able to get them back off like uk describes.

UK, a 1200 ft/lb impact??? Geez, you related to Tim "Tool Man" Taylor?
 
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Old 05-19-12, 06:12 PM
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was a gift... what can I say - for free, even vinegar tastes sweet. it's not the gun, it's the compressor I am proud of.
 
  #6  
Old 05-20-12, 02:59 AM
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Great suggestions, thank you. Yeah, was thinking any further hauling on the pipe and this little car will be flipping onto it's roof !

1200 ft lbs - that's a LOTTA nuggah-nuggahs - what are you servicing, bulldozers !
 
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Old 05-20-12, 08:18 AM
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no. believe it or not, I had 600 pounder new from store, and it won't even budge a lug nut.
Issue is not with power tools. Issue is with compressors we normally use at home. Power tools want a high air flow compressors, with a lot of CFMs under high pressure. None of standard DIY garge owners have those.
Also, it's question of plumbing. What do we normally have - 1/4 inch inside diameter hose? It simply chokes air flow. I have screw drive compressor at work, with 27 CFM at 250 psi - and pressure drops down by 50% in room, farthest from it. As it's only 3/8th inside copper piping.
If you look at pro garage comps, they are 2 things: BIG, and have serious plumbing to them.

Btw, was told that new 24V electrical impact wrenches are much more powerful than their air brethren. And you can take them anywhere you want to.

Anyhow, I had wheel off my Silvie yesterday, using that impact wrench - she still hesitates to break lugs loose.
 
  #8  
Old 05-29-12, 07:30 AM
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funny, I hand a very similar problem a couple months ago, and I am not new to these nuts. It was a 2000 corolla.

Tried a 550ft lb husky impact wrench from home depot, wouldnt budge.

Tried a 4 foot breaker bar combined with a torch to heat the nut up, snapped the wrench.

Went out and bought a 425ft lb chicago pnuematic (very good brand) impact wrench. Zipped it right off. I was amazed.

If you frequently wrench on cars, just shell out for a nice impact wrench. All I can say is, go with a reputable brand. I finally did it, and it makes the jobs so much easier. So happy with my purchase.
 
  #9  
Old 05-29-12, 07:50 AM
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ukrbyk

no. believe it or not, I had 600 pounder new from store, and it won't even budge a lug nut.
Issue is not with power tools. Issue is with compressors we normally use at home. Power tools want a high air flow compressors, with a lot of CFMs under high pressure. None of standard DIY garge owners have those.
Also, it's question of plumbing. What do we normally have - 1/4 inch inside diameter hose? It simply chokes air flow. I have screw drive compressor at work, with 27 CFM at 250 psi - and pressure drops down by 50% in room, farthest from it. As it's only 3/8th inside copper piping.
If you look at pro garage comps, they are 2 things: BIG, and have serious plumbing to them.

Btw, was told that new 24V electrical impact wrenches are much more powerful than their air brethren. And you can take them anywhere you want to.

Anyhow, I had wheel off my Silvie yesterday, using that impact wrench - she still hesitates to break lugs loose.
I was under the impression the cfm was not an issue unless it was for extended use. For example the compressor motor can't fill the tank up as fast as you are using it, which would mean it doesn't really matter with an impact gun because you aren't just leaving it on.

Actually, I'm pretty sure you are wrong about that, if you will notice, pretty much all impact guns have the same connection on them. Which is about a 1/4 inch hole. The inner diameter of the line really isn't that significant.
 
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